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See detailAlgorithmic Trading in Experimental Markets with Human Traders: A Literature Survey
Neugebauer, Tibor UL; Nekrasova, Elizaveta UL; Bao, Te et al

in HANDBOOK OF EXPERIMENTAL FINANCE (in press)

This chapter surveys the nascent experimental research on the interaction between human and algorithmic (bot) traders in experimental markets. We first discuss studies in which algorithmic traders are in ... [more ▼]

This chapter surveys the nascent experimental research on the interaction between human and algorithmic (bot) traders in experimental markets. We first discuss studies in which algorithmic traders are in the researcher’s hands. Specifically, the researcher assigns computer agents as traders in the market. We then followed it up by discussing studies in which the researcher allows human traders to decide whether to employ algorithms for trading or to trade by themselves. The paper introduces the types and performances of algorithmic traders that interact with human subjects in the laboratory, including zero-intelligent traders, arbitragers, fundamentalists, adaptive algorithms, and manipulators. We find that whether algorithm traders earn more profit than human traders crucially depends on the asset’s fundamental value process and the market environment. The potential impact of interactions with algorithms on the investor’s psychology is also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCOVID-19 Compliance Behaviors of Older People: The Role of Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills
Clark, Andrew; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Onur, Ilke et al

in Economics Letters (in press)

This paper examines the empirical relationship between individuals’ cognitive and non-cognitive abilities and COVID-19 compliance behaviors using cross-country data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and ... [more ▼]

This paper examines the empirical relationship between individuals’ cognitive and non-cognitive abilities and COVID-19 compliance behaviors using cross-country data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We find that both cognitive and non-cognitive skills predict responsible health behaviors during the COVID-19 crisis. Episodic memory is the most important cognitive skill, while conscientiousness and neuroticism are the most significant personality traits. There is also some evidence of a role for an internal locus of control in compliance. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Principle of Transparency and Access to Documents in the EU: for what, for whom, and of what?
Mendes, Joana UL

in Auby, Jean-Bernard; Jacqueline, Dutheil de la Rochère (Eds.) Traité de Droit Administratif (in press)

Written as a chapter for the third edition of the Traité de Droit Administratif Européen, directed by Jacqueline Dutheil de la Rochère and Jean Bernard Auby (Bryulant, forthcoming), this paper ... [more ▼]

Written as a chapter for the third edition of the Traité de Droit Administratif Européen, directed by Jacqueline Dutheil de la Rochère and Jean Bernard Auby (Bryulant, forthcoming), this paper characterizes transparency as an ambivalent principle of EU law and governance, serving both a functional and a democratic rationale. The analysis focuses on the right of access to documents, a right whose scope and democratic function very much depend on who requests and on the interpretation of the exceptions to access. While the former is a matter of practice, the latter is essentially the result of the main approaches that the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has followed hitherto: strict interpretation and application of the exceptions, on the one hand, and general presumptions of non-disclosure, on the other. The paper presents both. It argues that, while much criticized in the literature as contrary to the democratic function of the regulation on access to documents, general presumptions of non-disclosure merit a more nuanced analysis. They can be, under restricted circumstances, a way to protect the democratic function of the citizen’s right to access. Yet, the uncertain and evolving criteria for the establishment of a general presumption of non-disclosure have effectively carved out whole categories of documents from the possibility of access, insulating significant sections of EU public action from the pressure of democratic claims. Overall, the right of access to documents, as ancillary to a principle of democracy, has a limited capacity to change the nature of the polity and of the system of governance in which it is embedded. [less ▲]

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See detailEngagement féministe en sons et en images dans l’œuvre cinématographique d’Assia Djebar
Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène UL

in Guaaybess, Tourya; Di Cesare, Nurit; Levy, Jessica (Eds.) et al Femmes engagées au cœur de l’action. Mise en récit(s), mise en image(s) (in press)

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See detailEpistemological, critical and reflexive gymnastics: constructing research in "former Yugoslavia" in the face of the coloniality of knowledge
Blondel, Cyril UL

in Aiken, Gerald Taylor; Button, Cat (Eds.) Over-researched places (in press)

This article is a story narrating the evolution of my own reflections during my Ph.D.: “Planning at the Borders of European Peripheries: The Serbia/Croatia Borderland and the EU Cooperation and ... [more ▼]

This article is a story narrating the evolution of my own reflections during my Ph.D.: “Planning at the Borders of European Peripheries: The Serbia/Croatia Borderland and the EU Cooperation and Reconciliation Injunctions” (Ph.D. thesis, Tours, Université François-Rabelais, 2016). Using auto-ethnographic methods, this article demonstrates a conviction, the necessity to engage with a reflexive and critical approach, before, during, and after the production of research. I show first how I built the thesis’ epistemological approach, by progressively deconstructing classical theoretical frameworks (nationalist, postsocialist, post-Yugoslav). I expose and discuss then the outcomes of such a reflexivity, in particular how I gradually became conscious of the coloniality of (my) knowledge. These mental gymnastics allowed me to occasionally overcome – but regularly report on – the limits of my research, but also to recognize the unsurpassibility of certain aspects of my work connected to the situation in which I stated and conducted it. Reflecting on epistemological reflexivity contributes to clarifying scientific (in)validity of research, and better situates researcher’s arguments, their position and positionality. [less ▲]

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See detailSelecting Fault Revealing Mutants
Titcheu Chekam, Thierry UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (in press)

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See detailBlockchain Governance: An Overview and Prediction of Optimal Strategies Using Nash Equilibrium
Khan, Nida UL; Ahmad, Tabrez; Patel, Anass et al

in 3rd AUE International Research Conference (in press)

Blockchain governance is a subject of ongoing research and an interdisciplinary view of blockchain governance is vital to aid in further research for establishing a formal governance framework for this ... [more ▼]

Blockchain governance is a subject of ongoing research and an interdisciplinary view of blockchain governance is vital to aid in further research for establishing a formal governance framework for this nascent technology. In this paper, the position of blockchain governance within the hierarchy of Institutional governance is discussed. Blockchain governance is analyzed from the perspective of IT governance using Nash equilibrium to predict the outcome of different governance decisions. A payoff matrix for blockchain governance is created and simulation of different strategy profiles is accomplished for computation of all Nash equilibria. We also create payoff matrices for different kinds of blockchain governance, which were used to propose novel mathematical formulae usable to predict the best governance strategy that minimizes the occurrence of a hard fork as well as predicts the behavior of the majority during protocol updates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 260 (22 UL)
See detail"Aktion 18 und Quiz 3000"
Nonoa, Koku Gnatuloma UL

in Kovacs, Teresa; Scheinpflug, Peter; Wortmann, Thomas (Eds.) Schlingensief-Handbuch Leben – Werk – Wirkung (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (7 UL)
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See detailWüllner, Adolf
Krebs, Stefan UL; Tschacher, Werner UL

in Neue Deutsche Biographie, Bd. 28 (in press)

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See detailBiomedical and Clinical Research Data Management
Ganzinger, Matthias; Glaab, Enrico UL; Kerssemakers, Jules et al

in Wolkenhauer, Olaf (Ed.) Systems Medicine - Integrative, Qualitative and Computational Approaches (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 205 (11 UL)
See detailNous l'avions attendu pendant des mois
Cicotti, Claudio UL

in Malvetti, Massimo (Ed.) Dante et Henri VII de Luxembourg: de l'utopie au prophetisme (in press)

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See detailBuilding FinTech Ecosystems: Regulatory Sandboxes, Innovation Hubs and Beyond
Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas; Veidt, Robin UL et al

in Washington University Journal of Law and Policy (in press), 61

Around the world, regulators and policymakers are working to support the development of financial technology (FinTech) ecosystems. As one example, over 50 jurisdictions have now established or announced ... [more ▼]

Around the world, regulators and policymakers are working to support the development of financial technology (FinTech) ecosystems. As one example, over 50 jurisdictions have now established or announced “financial regulatory sandboxes”. Others have announced or established “innovation hubs”, sometimes incorporating a regulatory sandbox as one element. This article argues that innovation hubs provide all the benefits that the policy discussion associates with regulatory sandboxes, while avoiding most downsides of regulatory sandboxes, and that many benefits typically attributed to sandboxes are the result of inconsistent terminology, and actually accrue from the work of innovation hubs. The paper presents, as the first contribution of its kind, data on regulatory sandboxes and innovation hubs and argues that the data so far available on sandboxes does not justify the statement that regulatory sandboxes are the most effective approach to building FinTech ecosystems. Given that regulatory sandboxes require significant financial contributions, sometimes new legislation, and intense regulatory risk management, and that sandboxes do not work as well on a stand-alone basis (i.e. without an innovation hub), while innovation hubs alone can provide more significant benefits in supporting the development of a FinTech ecosystem, regulators should focus their resources on developing effective innovation hubs, including in appropriate cases a sandbox as one possible element. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Future of Data-Driven Finance and RegTech
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas et al

in Journal of Law and Policy (in press)

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See detailArticle 47 of the Charter in the Opinion procedure
Neframi, Eleftheria UL

in European Papers (in press)

This paper affirms that external relations are outside the scope of Article 47 of the Charter. This does not however mean that the principle of judicial protection and the right of access to an ... [more ▼]

This paper affirms that external relations are outside the scope of Article 47 of the Charter. This does not however mean that the principle of judicial protection and the right of access to an independent tribunal have only an internal EU law dimension. In Opinion 1/17, The Court of Justice could assess the CETA’s compatibility with the right of access to an independent tribunal without having recourse to Article 47 of the Charter, on the ground either of the principle of autonomy or of the compatibility with the substantive provisions of the common commercial policy. This paper argues that while judicial protection as part of the autonomy claim could meet some conceptual limits, promoting judicial protection as part of the common commercial policy could reinforce the perception that the Union is a credible and influential actor in international trade and in international procedural law. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 122 (8 UL)