References of "2007"
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See detailRelative Effect of Public and Private Investment on Côte d'Ivoire's Economic Performance
Aka, Bedia François UL

in Applied Econometrics and International Development (2007), 7(1), 149-156

This paper investigates the impact of public and private investment on Côte d’Ivoire’s economic performance (GDP growth) over the period 1969-2001, using an autoregressive-distributed lag (ARDL) Error ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the impact of public and private investment on Côte d’Ivoire’s economic performance (GDP growth) over the period 1969-2001, using an autoregressive-distributed lag (ARDL) Error Correction Model (ECM). The results shows that in the short run an increase in private investment by 1% enhance economic growth by 28%, while a 1% increase in public investment leads to only 7% increase in real GDP. In the long run nevertheless the impact of public investment on GDP growth has been higher than private investment, a 1% increase in private investment leads to 25% increase in GDP, while public investment impacts growth by 37%. On the other hand, a 1% increase in employment leads to 38% increase in long run GDP growth. The main findings indicate that while the short run efficiency of public capital can be further improved in Côte d’Ivoire, in the same time the efficiency of private investment can be improved in the long run. [less ▲]

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See detailAccelerated microRNA-Precursor Detection Using the Smith-Waterman Algorithm on FPGAs
May, Patrick UL; Klau, Gunnar W.; Bauer, Markus et al

in Dubitzky, Werner; Schuster, Assaf; Sloot, Peterm A. (Eds.) et al Distributed, High-Performance and Grid Computing in Computational Biology (2007)

During the last few years more and more functionalities of RNA have been discovered that were previously thought of being carried out by proteins alone. One of the most striking discoveries was the ... [more ▼]

During the last few years more and more functionalities of RNA have been discovered that were previously thought of being carried out by proteins alone. One of the most striking discoveries was the detection of microRNAs, a class of noncoding RNAs that play an important role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Large-scale analyses are needed for the still increasingly growing amount of sequence data derived from new experimental technologies. In this paper we present a framework for the detection of the distinctive precursor structure of microRNAS that is based on the well-known Smith-Waterman algorithm. By conducting the computation of the local alignment on a FPGA, we are able to gain a substantial speedup compared to a pure software implementation bringing together supercomputer performance and bioinformatics research. We conducted experiments on real genomic data and we found several new putative hits for microRNA precursor structures. [less ▲]

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See detailStill the same and better off than others? Social and temporal comparisons in old age
Ferring, Dieter UL; Hoffmann, M.

in European Journal of Ageing (2007), 4(1), 23-34

Cognitive adaptation in the elderly and the motivated use of temporal and social comparisons set the conceptual frame for the present study. Three research questions were investigated in a sample of 2.129 ... [more ▼]

Cognitive adaptation in the elderly and the motivated use of temporal and social comparisons set the conceptual frame for the present study. Three research questions were investigated in a sample of 2.129 persons aged between 50 and 90 years. First, the direction of social and temporal comparisons for three domains (physical fitness, mental fitness, psychological resilience) was studied, and findings did show that especially lateral followed by upward comparisons were most frequent under both perspectives; downward comparisons clearly showed the least frequency. Second, the distribution of comparison directions was investigated across four age groups. These analyses showed that upward comparisons increased and lateral comparisons decreased across age groups; differential results were observed for the domains under consideration. Third, the relation between social and temporal comparisons and self-esteem was studied. Results obtained here indicated a motivated use of specific comparison directions since downward social comparisons and upward temporal comparisons were most frequent in persons with low self-esteem. Taken together, the study underlines the different functions of social and temporal comparisons in adulthood and old age; it indicates a predominant need for consensus and consistency, and it highlights the importance of self-esteem in cognitive adaptation. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction: The university revisited.
Simons, M.; Haverhals, B.; Biesta, Gert UL

in Studies in Philosophy & Education (2007), 26(5), 395-404

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See detail'Creating access to Europe's televisual heritage'. VIDEO ACTIVE - ein Projektbericht
Fickers, Andreas UL

in Rundfunk und Geschichte (2007)

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See detailBrain Drain and LDC's Growth: winners and losers
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Rapoport, Hillel

in Economic Journal (2007), 118

We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache ... [more ▼]

We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache, 1998), we find empirical support for the "beneficial brain drain hypothesis" in a cross-section of 50 developing countries. At the country-level, we find that most countries combining low levels of human capital and low migration rates of skilled workers tend to be positively affected by the brain drain. By contrast, the brain drain appears to have negative growth effects in countries where the migration rate of the highly educated is above 20% and/or where the proportion of people with higher education is above 5%. While the number of winners is smaller, these include nearly 80% of the total population of the sample. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropean Science Foundation Research Conference on 'Algebraic Aspects in Geometry'
Poncin, Norbert UL

Report (2007)

Abstracts of the ESF Conference 'Algebraic Aspects in Geometry' chaired by Norbert Poncin

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See detailHistoire et représentation. Le présent détermine l'unité du passé
Margue, Michel UL

in Transilvania (2007), 8-9

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See detailAgency and learning in the lifecourse: Towards an ecological perspective.
Biesta, Gert UL; Tedder, M.

in Studies in the Education of Adults (2007), 39(2), 132-149

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See detailLife satisfaction in older people in six European countries: Findings from the European Study on Adult Well-being
Ferring, Dieter UL; Balducci, Christian; Burholt, Vanessa et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2007), 1(1), 15-25

The European Study on Adult Well-being (ESAW), funded by the European Union, was conducted during 2002 and 2003 in Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden. The aim of the ... [more ▼]

The European Study on Adult Well-being (ESAW), funded by the European Union, was conducted during 2002 and 2003 in Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden. The aim of the interdisciplinary study was the conceptual clarification and the identification of factors contributing to life satisfaction for older people. Five key components were included in the study: (1) physical health and functional status; (2) self-resources; (3) material security; (4) social support resources; and (5) life activity. A representative population of adults aged 50-90 years living independently (not institutionalised) was selected in each participating country, and the actual sample size came very close to the target of 2,000, ranging from 1,854 to 2,417. The total European sample comprised 12,478 respondents. In this paper, mean differences in general and domain-specific life satisfaction between the six countries including age groups and gender are reported and discussed with respect to contextual national characteristics. In general the findings showed a high level in all chosen indicators of life satisfaction across the six countries. National differences depended on the domain under consideration, but the results showed in general that The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Luxembourg and Austria had higher values of life satisfaction compared to Sweden and Italy. [less ▲]

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See detailGütertransport und Logistik im räumlichen Kontext. Editorial.
Hesse, Markus UL

in Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie (2007), 51(2), 73-76

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See detailBeyond Re/Presentation: A Case for Updating the Epistemology of Schooling.
Biesta, Gert UL; Osberg, D. C.

in Interchange (2007), 38(1), 15-29

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See detailSpatial configurations in a periurban city: a cellular automata-based microeconomic model
Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Peeters, Dominique; Cavailhès, Jean et al

in Regional Science & Urban Economics (2007), 37(5), 542-567

This paper presents a microeconomic model of residential location that explores the emergence of a mixed belt where residents and farmers coexist beyond a city. The model is based on integrating urban ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a microeconomic model of residential location that explores the emergence of a mixed belt where residents and farmers coexist beyond a city. The model is based on integrating urban economics with cellular automata in order to simulate equilibrium patterns in 2D and through time. Households commute to a CBD and enjoy neighbourhood externalities that are a function of both local residential density and farmland, or open space. They bid on the competitive land market and locate so as to maximize utility. Incremental population growth changes the neighbourhood and leads to rent adaptations. With appropriate parameter values a mixed belt may emerge between the urban and agricultural specialized areas. Settlements within this mixed area are more or less clustered or scattered depending on preferences and neighbourhood size. [less ▲]

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See detailLes principes généraux du droit ont-ils un avenir en tant qu'instrument de protection des droits fondamentaux dans l'Union européenne ?
Gerkrath, Jörg UL

in Revue des Affaires Européennes [= RAE] = Law & European Affairs (2007), (1), 31-43

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See detailEducation and the democratic person: Towards a political understanding of democratic education.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Teachers College Record (2007), 109(3), 740-769

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See detailKOMPLETT - Ein Verbundvorhaben zur Schließung von Wasser- und Stoffkreisläufen.
Hansen, Joachim UL; Krystkiewicz, D.; Sagawe, G. et al

in Gas- und Wasserfach. Wasser, Abwasser (2007), 10

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See detailNetwork Architecture, Barter Exchange and the Diffusion of Ideas
Jonard, Nicolas UL; Cowan, Robin

in International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance & Ecology (2007), 6(2), 165-178

We model knowledge diffusion as agents exchanging ideas through a barter process. The model builds on empirical observations of informal knowledge trading among competing agents. The process takes place ... [more ▼]

We model knowledge diffusion as agents exchanging ideas through a barter process. The model builds on empirical observations of informal knowledge trading among competing agents. The process takes place on a network substrate in which agents are nodes, and can trade only with those to whom they have direct links (edges). When two agents meet, they make a mutually profitable trade. This process repeats, and is the foundation on which knowledge diffuses through the economy. Our interest is in how the structure of the network affects diffusion performance. The extent of idea diffusion is affected both by the circumference of the graph and by local coherence: diffusion is most efficient when the network is a small world. The distribution of knowledge over agents is also most equal when networks are small worlds. [less ▲]

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See detailContent of quality-of-life instruments is affected by item-generation methods
Rat, A. C.; Pouchot, J.; Guillemin, F. et al

in International Journal for Quality in Health Care (2007), 19(6), 390-398

Methods used to generate items for complex measurement scales are heterogeneous and probably produce heterogeneous data, yet nothing is known about the advantages of one method over another. Objective. We ... [more ▼]

Methods used to generate items for complex measurement scales are heterogeneous and probably produce heterogeneous data, yet nothing is known about the advantages of one method over another. Objective. We aimed to compare methods of generating items for tools designed to measure quality-of-life for patients. Methods. We used five methods to develop a quality-of-life instrument for patients with lower-limb osteoarthritis: individual interviews with patients involving two different techniques (semi-structured and cognitive), individual interviews with health professionals, and focus groups of patients and health professionals. The process generated 80 items, of which 37 were excluded after content and psychometric analysis. With the final 43-item scale used as a ‘reference standard’, we estimated the contribution of each method. Results. For health professionals, the focus group and individual interviews produced 35 and 81% of the items, respectively. For patients, the focus groups produced 74% of the items and both interview techniques 100% of the items. Health professionals provided a narrower picture of the effects of the disease on quality-of-life. Focus groups contributed less to social domains than did individual interviews. The two patient interview techniques highlighted different themes. Conclusion. In developing a complex measurement scale for patients, we found individual interviews with patients the best method for formulating items; other methods such as physician interviews and focus groups contributed no additional information. Reports of instrument generation should include details of the item-generation step, the methods used to develop items and the number of people involved. [less ▲]

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See detailLexikalische Erörterungen im XVII Jahrhundert
Cicotti, Claudio UL

in Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie (2007), 123(3), 452-464

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See detailLes franchissements de seuils
Conac, Pierre-Henri UL

in Encyclopédie Dalloz de Droit des sociétés (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (2 UL)