References of "Greiff, Samuel 50001890"
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See detailDispositions for collaborative problem solving.
Scalise, Kathleen; Mustafic, Maida UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Kuger, Susanne; Klieme, Eckhard; Jude, Nina (Eds.) et al Assessing context of learning world-wide (in press)

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See detailWell-being and working from home during COVID-19
Schifano, Sonia UL; Clark, Andrew; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Information Technology and People (in press)

Purpose – The authors track the well-being of individuals across five European countries during the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and relate their well-being to working from ... [more ▼]

Purpose – The authors track the well-being of individuals across five European countries during the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and relate their well-being to working from home. The authors also consider the role of pandemic-policy stringency in affecting well-being in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The authors have four waves of novel harmonised longitudinal data in France, Italy, Germany, Spain and Sweden, covering the period May–November 2020. Well-being is measured in five dimensions: life satisfaction, a worthwhile life, loneliness, depression and anxiety. A retrospective diary indicates whether the individual was working in each month since February 2020 and if so whether at home or not at home. Policy stringency is matched in per country at the daily level. The authors consider both cross- section and panel regressions and the mediating and moderating effects of control variables, including household variables and income. Findings – Well-being among workers is lower for those who work from home, and those who are not working have the lowest well-being of all. The panel results are more mitigated, with switching into working at home yielding a small drop in anxiety. The panel and cross-section difference could reflect adaptation or the selection of certain types of individuals into working at home. Policy stringency is always negatively correlated with well-being. The authors find no mediation effects. The well-being penalty from working at home is larger for the older, the better-educated, those with young children and those with more crowded housing. Originality/value – The harmonised cross-country panel data on individuals’ experiences during COVID-19 are novel. The authors relate working from home and policy stringency to multiple well-being measures. The authors emphasise the effect of working from home on not only the level of well-being but also its distribution. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of problem solving
Krkovic, K.; Mustafic, Maida UL; Wüstenberg, S. et al

in Griffin, P.; McGaw, B.; Care, E. (Eds.) Assessment and teaching of 21st century skills (in press)

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See detailAssessing collaborative problem-solving skills among elementary school students
Rojas, Matias; Nussbaum, Miguel; Chiuminatto, Pablo et al

in Computers and Education (2021), 175

As 21st century skills have become increasingly important, Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) is now considered essential in almost all areas of life. Different theoretical frameworks and assessment ... [more ▼]

As 21st century skills have become increasingly important, Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) is now considered essential in almost all areas of life. Different theoretical frameworks and assessment instruments have emerged for measuring this skill. However, more applied studies on its implementation and evaluation in real-life educational settings are required. In this sense, pre-post experimental designs are essential for identifying new methods for developing collaborative problem-solving skills. To do so, equivalent tests are needed to facilitate consistent score interpretations and reduce the practice effect. In the present study, a Design-Based Research approach is used to design and validate an assessment tool with two equivalent forms based on a framework proposed by the OECD and applied to a collaborative activity. A total of 719 students aged between 10 and 13 years old participated in the different stages of the study. The results show that the proposed instrument effectively measures the problem-solving dimension of collaborative problem-solving skills among students of this age. Moreover, the results from the test were equivalent for both forms and across genders. Finally, there were no significant differences when assessing collaborative problem-solving in human-human groups versus human-agent groups using the proposed instrument. For future work, we recommend including other data sources than just text-based conversations. This would allow us to capture the rich social interactions present in this type of activity. Future work should also consider exploring the extent to which skills could be trained. This could be done in an experimental design assessed using the equivalent forms of the proposed instrument as a pre- and post-test. Doing so would provide a more accurate measure of students’ collaborative skills. [less ▲]

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See detailFacets of conscientiousness and their relation to academic achievement: a person-centered approach
Franzen, Patrick UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Arens, A Katrin et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 16)

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See detailLost in transition – Learning analytics on the transfer from knowledge acquisition to knowledge application in complex problem solving
Nicolay, Björn Fabrice UL; Krieger, Florian UL; Stadler, Matthias et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2021), 115

Since Complex Problem Solving (CPS) skills represent a key competence for educational success, they are of great relevance for learning analytics. More specifically, CPS serves as a pertinent showcase for ... [more ▼]

Since Complex Problem Solving (CPS) skills represent a key competence for educational success, they are of great relevance for learning analytics. More specifically, CPS serves as a pertinent showcase for addressing a crucial existing gap contemporary education is facing, the gap between students' ability to acquire and subsequently apply knowledge in uncertain situations, which are increasingly important in the 21st century. While the CPS process incorporates both the acquisition and application of knowledge, many earlier studies have focused on identifying the factors relevant for success in knowledge acquisition. Given the dearth of existing research on factors influencing a successful transition between both CPS phases, we investigated the rates of successful and unsuccessful knowledge transition over the course of nine CPS items in a sample of N = 1151 students in 9th grade. Results showed that many participants were unable to transition their knowledge from the acquisition to the application phase, which was presumably due to an inefficient mental model transfer. Furthermore, the likelihood of students being ‘lost in transition’ was higher in more complex items. Implications are discussed in light of learning analytics, and particularly with regard to the factors to be taken into account by future CPS training programs. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ Personality Relates to Experienced Variability in State Academic Self-Concept
Hausen, Jennifer UL; Möller, Jens; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 11)

Attaining a positive academic self-concept (ASC) is linked to many desirable educational outcomes. Research on which student attributes relate to the formation of ASC is therefore considered to be central ... [more ▼]

Attaining a positive academic self-concept (ASC) is linked to many desirable educational outcomes. Research on which student attributes relate to the formation of ASC is therefore considered to be central. Past research on the association between personality traits and ASC has taken an interindividual perspective, while the intraindividual perspective has been disregarded. The present research explored the relation between students’ Big Five traits and intraindividual variability in state general-school ASC in everyday school life for the first time using intensive longitudinal data. We drew on N=294 German ninth and tenth graders who completed a three-week e-diary and a previously presented 60-item Big Five questionnaire (BFI-2; Danner et al., 2016; Soto & John, 2017) assessing Open-Mindedness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Negative Emotionality as well as their respective subfacets (i.e., resulting in 15 subfacets). To assess state ASC, students completed three items after every single lesson across four different subjects (resulting in Mlessons = 21.12). We ran six mixed-effects location scale models: one specified with all five Big Five domains, and five (one for each Big Five domain) with the subfacets as predictors of intraindividual variability in state ASC. We found that Open-Mindedness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Negative Emotionality as well as at least one subfacet of each Big Five trait were significant predictors of levels of state ASC independently of students’ gender and reasoning ability, and the narrower subfacets Organization (Conscientiousness) and Depression (Negative Emotionality) predicted variability in state ASC independently of students’ gender and reasoning ability. These findings thus provide first evidence that students’ ASC undergoes short-term fluctuations from school lesson to school lesson and that this intraindividual variability can be partly explained by students’ personality. Our results thus contribute to a more complete map of the formation of ASC and the role of personality therein. [less ▲]

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See detailThe development and validation of a short conscientiousness questionnaire for large-scale educational assessment
van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Franzen, Patrick UL; Arens, A. Katrin et al

Scientific Conference (2020, July)

Conscientiousness and its subfacets are related to multiple learning-related outcomes. MacCann, Duckworth and Roberts (2009) developed a questionnaire measuring seven subfacets of conscientiousness with ... [more ▼]

Conscientiousness and its subfacets are related to multiple learning-related outcomes. MacCann, Duckworth and Roberts (2009) developed a questionnaire measuring seven subfacets of conscientiousness with 59 items. However, the resources required to complete such long scales often renders it unsuitable for large-scale educational assessment. Consequently, an economic and psychometrically sound conscientiousness questionnaire that is specifically customized for this context is needed. We developed and validated a short version of the MacCann et al. (2009) questionnaire. In study 1, French and German adaptations of the questionnaire were administered to a representative dataset comprising all ninth-graders in Luxembourg (N1=6325, Cohort 2017). Using an exhaustive search algorithm, we identified the optimal combination of four items for each subfacet by simultaneously considering three criteria: goodness of fit, factor saturation, and scalar measurement invariance across the German and French versions. In study 2, we validated our short 28-item questionnaire on a second, independent sample comprising 6,279 Luxembourgish ninth-graders (Cohort 2018). A 7-factor model assuming separate factors for each subfacet obtained acceptable fit (CFI=.93, RMSEA=.04, SRMR=.06). The criterion validity for each subfacet was tested by examining the relation to standardized achievement tests (SATs). In study 3, drawing on a dataset of 275 tenth-graders (linked longitudinally with the ninth-grade data from study 1), evidence of predictive validity (i.e., school grades) was examined. The subfacets of industriousness, caution and perfectionism showed the strongest relations with both SATs (study 2) and school grades (study 3). Our study delivered a short, valid and reliable questionnaire for the assessment of seven conscientiousness facets in the educational context. The scale is invariant across the German and French language versions and its brevity makes it suitable for large-scale educational assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-concept, interest, and achievement within and across math and verbal domains in first- and third-graders
van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Arens, A. Katrin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, April)

The generalized internal/external frame-of-reference (G)I/E model explains the formation of domain-specific motivational-affective constructs through social and dimensional comparisons. We examined the ... [more ▼]

The generalized internal/external frame-of-reference (G)I/E model explains the formation of domain-specific motivational-affective constructs through social and dimensional comparisons. We examined the associations between verbal and math achievement and corresponding domain-specific academic self-concepts (ASCs) and interests for first-graders and third-graders (N=21,192). Positive achievement-self-concept and achievement-interest relations were found within matching-domains in both grades, while negative cross-domains achievement-self-concept and achievement-interest relations were only found for third-graders. These findings suggest that while the formation of domain-specific ASCs and interests seem to rely on social and dimensional comparisons for third-graders, only social comparisons seem to be in operation for first-graders. Gender and cohort invariance was established in both grade levels. Findings are discussed within the framework of ASC differentiation and dimensional comparison theory. [less ▲]

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See detailAre the Machines Taking Over?: Benefits and Challenges of Using Algorithms in (Short) Scale Construction
Dörendahl, Jan UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2020)

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See detailThe assessment of collaborative problem solving in PISA 2015: Can computer agents replace humans?
Herborn, Katharina; Stadler, Matthias; Mustafic, Maida et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020)

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See detailReligiosity predicts unreasonable coping with COVID-19
Kranz, Dirk; Niepel, Christoph UL; Botes, E'louise UL et al

in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (2020)

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See detailGenerating codebooks to ensure the independent use of research data. Some guidelines
Horstmann, K T; Arslan, R; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2020), 36

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See detailThe Multidimensional Forced-Choice Format as an alternative for rating scales. Current state of research
Wetzel, E; Frick, S; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2020), 36

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See detailEditorial: Advancements in Technology-Based Assessment: Emerging Item Formats, Test Designs, and Data Sources
Goldhammer, Frank; Scherer, Ronny; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2020)

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See detailSome critical reflections on the special issue: Collaboration in the 21st century: The theory, assessment, and teaching of collaborative problem solving
Stadler, Matthias; Shubeck, Keith T.; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020)

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See detailMeasuring Anxiety in Older Adults: Development, Diagnostic Accuracy, and Preliminary Validation of a Short-Form of the German Geriatric Anxiety Scale (GAS-G-SF)
Gottschling, Juliana UL; Dörendahl, Jan UL; Prell, Tino et al

in Journal of Personality Assessment (2020), 102(2), 196-204

Anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among older adults, and are associ- ated with considerable distress, functional impairment, and burden. Also, there is growing need for brief ... [more ▼]

Anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among older adults, and are associ- ated with considerable distress, functional impairment, and burden. Also, there is growing need for brief instruments to measure anxiety symptoms in primary care and geriatric medical settings. Therefore, the current study focuses on the development and psychometric evaluation of a short- form of the Geriatric Anxiety Scale (GAS-G), a well-established anxiety instrument for use with older adults. Study 1 draws on the original data from the GAS-G validation study (N1⁄4242) to develop the short-form (GAS-G-SF) and determines whether the results replicate with the short- form. Study 2 extends the validation of the GAS-G-SF to a clinical sample (N1⁄4156; 62 patients with heart disease, 94 patients with Parkinson’s disease). Overall, the GAS-G-SF showed promising psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency and validity. Also, the GAS-G-SF showed good discriminatory power based on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in both stud- ies. These results support the utility of the GAS-G-SF as a brief assessment measure for anxiety. [less ▲]

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See detailHow working memory capacity and shifting matter for learning. A replication study using worked examples
Bichler, S; Schwaighofer, M; Stadler, M et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2020), 112

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See detailAre the machines taking over? Benefits of using algorithms in (short) scale construction
Dörendahl, Jan UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2020), 36

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)