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See detailSubjective Reasons for Using versus not Using Assistive Technologies in Aging Population: A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Poster (2019, May 24)

The number of older people with limitations of activities of daily living in developing countries is predicted to increase by a factor of four between 2015 and 2050. One possibility to overcome such ... [more ▼]

The number of older people with limitations of activities of daily living in developing countries is predicted to increase by a factor of four between 2015 and 2050. One possibility to overcome such limitations is to promote the use of assistive technologies (ATs) in the aging population. Despite evident benefits of ATs in this context, the use rate is still low. To find out why this is the case, we performed systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases about subjective reasons of older people for use and non-use of these devices. We then performed a meta-synthesis of the relevant studies in order to arrive at a comprehensive view of older people’s reasons for the use or non-use of ATs. Beliefs about ease to use and reliability of AT use as well as perceived suggestion by significant others to use ATs were important reasons for using them. Beliefs about insecurity, uselessness and other attributes of ATs as well as desires to avoid burden for others were major reasons for not using of ATs. We systematized the identified subjective reasons for using versus not using as referring to (1) situation of need and demand for an AT, (2) suggestion by significant others, (3) act of using, and (4) consequences of AT use. Most of the reasons were reasons for non-use such as beliefs about negative attributes of ATs, and the consequences of their use. In contrast, desires were only rarely mentioned as reasons for use or non-use of ATs. Comparing subjective reasons of our meta-synthesis with predictors in ATs use models, we found that only 5 out of 25 identified subjective reasons have already been considered in these models. Thus, these models appear not yet to be sufficiently comprehensive. We suggest integrating the identified subjective reasons from our meta-synthesis as additional predictors in a comprehensive AT use model with an improved predictive power. [less ▲]

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See detailA qualitative meta-synthesis of reasons for the use or non-use of assistive technologies in the aging population
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2019), 32(2), 79-92

Models of the use of assistive technologies (ATs) have only moderate value for predicting older people´s use of ATs. To find further predictors we performed a systematic literature review and – applying ... [more ▼]

Models of the use of assistive technologies (ATs) have only moderate value for predicting older people´s use of ATs. To find further predictors we performed a systematic literature review and – applying an action-theoretical approach – a meta-synthesis of seven qualitative studies about older people´s reasons for use or non-use of ATs. We found 25 reasons referring to user´s beliefs and desires (e.g., about demand, act of using ATs, its consequences) of which 18 were not contained in existing AT use models. Some reasons generalized across ATs (e.g., perceived unreliability), whereas others (e.g., privacy concerns, desire to avoid burden to others) appeared specific to tele-alarm or smart home technology. We discuss findings with respect to improving AT use models and developmental counseling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (22 UL)
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See detailComparative Evaluation of Models of Assistive Technologies’ Use
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ATs. Our presentation reviews existing models of ATs use, their applicability to specific types of AT, predictive value, fundamental elements, and critiques of such models. In systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar 46 papers were identified that met our inclusion criteria. 32 papers covered models of ATs use, applicability to special types of ATs, components of models, and their predictive value. 14 papers cover criticisms of models of AT use. We classified the models into two groups: The first included 11 models focusing on individuals’ mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires) as factors explaining ATs use; the second included 22 models that also considered contextual factors (e.g., social influence, physical environment) in addition to individuals’ mental states. Across both groups the most frequently included explanatory components were subjective norm and personal attitudes towards AT use, followed by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and then intention to use. Models were most frequently applied to information technologies followed by application to socially assistive robots. Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT2) and an extended version of Technology Acceptance Model showed the highest amount of explained variance in intention to use (56-74%) and an extended model of UTAUT in actual use of ATs (64%). We conclude with recommendations for further improvement of AT use models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (28 UL)
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See detailThe Reasons of Older people for the Use or Non-use of Assistive Technologies:
A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT ... [more ▼]

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT) can help to overcome some activity limitations relevant to aging. Although ATs have potential benefits (e.g., to reduce the burden of caregivers, to increase independence), their usage rate is still low. Whereas several reviews of quantitative studies on factors of ATs use already exist, a systematic review of qualitative research about AT use is still missing. The aim of the current review is to provide more differentiated answers about what makes some older people use ATs while others not. Based on systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 18 relevant papers were identified according to our selection criteria. These studies were based on to self-reported reasons of older people for using or not-using diverse types of ATs designed for many different activities. We classified the key reasons as referring to three aspects: attributes of “potential technology users”, “context”, and “technology”. Perceived usefulness and attitudes towards use were the most common “personal” reasons and social impact by significant others was the most common “contextual” reason, and technology design was the most common “technological” reason influencing use or non-use of ATs. We discussed the identified reasons in relation to the major models of developmental self-regulation and action-theoretical approaches to development in age. Based on the current review, we generated methodological and theoretical recommendations for future research and for practical applications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (16 UL)
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See detailBarriers and facilitators for the use of assistive technologies for activities of daily living
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help to overcome some limitations of activities of daily living and can thus be assumed to prevent, delay or reduce the need for personal long-term care as well as the burden on caring family members (e.g., spouses, adult children). Yet, the use rate of ATs is still rather low. This paper reviews positive effects of ATs and factors that influence their use. We performed systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google scholar databases. We found convergent results that the use of ATs for several kinds of activities of daily living such as self-care and mobility was associated with a reduced amount of self-reported personal (in particular informal) care hours. Regarding factors of ATs use, we found that feeling loneliness, cognitive impairments, and difficulty of use were some of barriers for the use of ATs. There is converging evidence that indicators of situation of need (in particular: disabilities in preforming self-care activities) are associated with an increased use of ATs. Slight to moderate functional limitations, chronic illnesses, and home-based training were some of the facilitators for the use of ATs. We concluded with recommendations for further improvement of studies relevant to ATs use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (8 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA systematic review of self-care assistive technologies for aging population
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These should become larger and more urgent in future, because ... [more ▼]

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These should become larger and more urgent in future, because the number of people 80+ is projected to more than double from 2010 to 2050 at least in EU and OECD countries. On the other side, there is a strong desire of older people, their relatives and policy makers to maintain the autonomy in old age as long as possible. In reaction to this, there have been strong social policy recommendations to develop and promote the use of assistive technologies (ATs). Whereas systematic reviews already exist for several other kinds of ATs, reviews about self-care ATs are still missing. Based on systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 203 papers were identified of which 12 were included according to our selection criteria. The methodological quality of all the reviewed studies is evaluated. We reviewed findings on indicators of independent living as efficiency criteria as well as evidence about facilitators and barriers of using these technologies. Self-care ATs turned out to be efficient with respect to reduced care hours and increased independence level. The actual use of these ATs was associated with personal, contextual, and device factors. Lack of randomized control trial studies and a need for further research about ATs in several domains of self-care activities is revealed. Based on the findings of the current review, we generate recommendations for future research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (43 UL)
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See detailSelf-care Assistive Technologies: A systematic review of studies on efficiency and factors influencing their use
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 05)

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity, as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These are expected to become more urgent in the future ... [more ▼]

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity, as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These are expected to become more urgent in the future, because the old-age dependency ratio in the EU is projected to nearly double until 2060 due to demographic change. On the other side, there is a strong desire to maintain the autonomy of older people as long as possible. In reaction to this, there have been strong health and social policy recommendations across Europe to develop and promote the use of assistive technologies (ATs). Whereas systematic reviews already exist for several kinds of ATs, reviews about self-care ATs are still missing. Based on a systematic literature search in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 203 papers were identified of which 13 were included according to our selection criteria. The methodological quality of all the reviewed studies is evaluated. We reviewed findings on objective and subjective indicators of independent living as efficiency criteria as well as evidence about facilitating and inhibiting factors in the use of these technologies. Self-care ATs turned out to be efficient, with respect to care hours, independence level, and self-reported satisfaction. The actual use of these ATs was influenced by diverse personal, contextual, and device aspects. Lack of randomized control trial studies and the need for a further research about ATs in the diverse subdomains of self-care activities is revealed. Based on the findings of the current study, we generate recommendations for future research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (41 UL)