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See detailInside the Trading Zone: Doing Digital Hermeneutics in an Interdisciplinary Setting
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Tatarinov, Juliane UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October 11)

Our contribution examines the conference theme of digital hermeneutics from the perspective of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) in ‘Digital History and Hermeneutics’, a four-year interdisciplinary ... [more ▼]

Our contribution examines the conference theme of digital hermeneutics from the perspective of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) in ‘Digital History and Hermeneutics’, a four-year interdisciplinary research and training program hosted by the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH) at the University of Luxembourg. The DTU is designed as an experimental platform for collaboration or ‘trading zone’, in which thirteen doctoral candidates with different disciplinary backgrounds – from history, linguistics and philosophy to computer and information science – study and reflect on the epistemological and methodological implications of the ‘digital turn’ on historical research. This presentation reflects on the project’s first year, in which the doctoral candidates were introduced to various skills and methods in digital humanities, including text mining, digital source criticism, database structures, data visualization, GIS analysis, tool criticism and algorithmic critique; and its second year, when data collections had been created and research tools identified that were going to be applied to it. By doing so, it presents some of the main practical and epistemological opportunities and challenges of “thinkering” with digital tools and technologies in the Digital History Lab of the C2DH, and it reflects scientific dissemination strategies for the group and the individual. The analysis is informed by studies on interdisciplinarity, digital humanities infrastructures and communities of practice. It furthermore draws on a series of semi-structured interviews and self-reflexive training reports, in which the doctoral candidates of the DTU reflect on their experiences in doing digital hermeneutics in an interdisciplinary setting. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital History as Trading Zone? Reflections from a Doctoral Training Unit
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 12)

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) “Digital History and Hermeneutics”, an interdisciplinary research and training programme that was established at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH) of the University of Luxembourg. The DTU is designed as an interdisciplinary “trading zone”, in which thirteen doctoral candidates with different disciplinary backgrounds – from history, linguistics and philosophy to computer and information science – reflect on the epistemological and methodological challenges of doing digital history and humanities research (Fickers 2015, 2012). The paper reflects on the project’s first year, in which the doctoral researchers were introduced to various skills and methods in digital humanities as part of the so-called “DH incubation phase”. This phase included trainings in text mining, digital source criticism, database structures, data visualization, GIS analysis, tool criticism and algorithmic critique. The paper presents some of the main practical and epistemological opportunities and challenges of “thinkering”: the playful experimentation with digital tools and technologies for doing historical research. It furthermore reflects on the practical and institutional challenges of constituting an interdisciplinary trading zone, like the DTU. As such, it addresses a number of critical questions: How to build bridges between different knowledge domains in a specific research environment? How to stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration and to get scholars out of their disciplinary or methodological comfort zones? What is at stake in such interdisciplinary trading zones? Who are the traders – and what is being traded? The analysis is informed by studies on interdisciplinarity (Klein 2015, Deegan and McCarty 2012, Stehr and Weingart 2000), trading zones (Collins et al. 2007, Galison 1996, Kemman 2019) and communities of practice (Wenger 1998). Empirically, it draws on a series of semi-structured interviews and thirty-nine self-reflexive training reports, in which the doctoral researchers of the DTU discuss their experiences of doing digital history and hermeneutics in an interdisciplinary setting. Finally, the paper evaluates the suitability of the trading zone concept as analytical framework for studying interdisciplinary collaborations in Digital History as a field. [less ▲]

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See detailHumanities Talk - radio interview by Danièle Wecker
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2018)

"De Mediewëssenschaftler Tim van der Heijden huet am Kader vum Projet "Changing Platforms of Ritualized Memory Practices: The Cultural Dynamics of Home Movies" d'Geschicht vum Amateurfilm recherchéiert ... [more ▼]

"De Mediewëssenschaftler Tim van der Heijden huet am Kader vum Projet "Changing Platforms of Ritualized Memory Practices: The Cultural Dynamics of Home Movies" d'Geschicht vum Amateurfilm recherchéiert. Dëse Projet kuckt sech de sougenannten Home Movie vum Ufank vun der Kamera 1895 bis d'Opkomme vun der digitaler Medieplattform YouTube 2005 un. Dobäi huet de van der Heijden sech besonnesch op Phas vum technologesche Wiessel konzentréiert a konstatéiert, datt sech net nëmmen d'Instrument ännert mat deem de private Filmemacher schafft, mee esou guer d'Aart a Weis, wéi sech erënnert gëtt. D'Danièle Wecker ënnerhält sech mam Tim van der Heijden iwwer Verännerungen am private Film." [less ▲]

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See detail'Analogue Renaissance': Strategies of Technostalgia with Kodak’s new Super 8 film camera
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, November 09)

“There are some moments that digital just can’t deliver, because it doesn’t have the incomparable depth and beauty of film. These moments inspired Kodak to design a new generation of film cameras.” Along ... [more ▼]

“There are some moments that digital just can’t deliver, because it doesn’t have the incomparable depth and beauty of film. These moments inspired Kodak to design a new generation of film cameras.” Along with this mission statement, Kodak announced the making of a new Super 8 film camera at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2016. The announcement preceded the re-release of various other “retro” and “vintage” products in the following years, including Kodak’s iconic Ektachrome film stock. This paper critically investigates Kodak’s so-called “Analogue Renaissance”, the return of these analogue amateur film technologies that used to be widely popular among amateur film and home moviemakers in the 1970s. The re-releases not only fostered the imagination of numerous hobbyists around the world who were familiar with analogue filmmaking already, but also a new generation of users interested in film’s analogue aesthetic and material qualities. The paper analyses Kodak’s cross-generational attempt to remediate, revive and re-imagine the Super 8 film camera as a past media technology in particular. Drawing on the concept of “technostalgia”, the reminiscence of past media technologies in contemporary memory practices, it aims to further build on previous attempts to theorize the dynamic relations between the past and the present, the analogue and the digital, and the archival and the performative. While Kodak has been strategically framing the new Super 8 film camera under the label of the “Analogue Renaissance”, it will be shown that it not limits itself to remediating the design and analogue functionality of the device’s idiosyncratic equivalent. On the contrary, remarkably enough, the new Super 8 camera comes with several additional digital features, such as the recording of digital sound and a LCD display. The paper argues that this merging of the film camera’s original analogue features with digital ones makes Kodak’s new film camera a fundamental “hybrid” media technology, whose manufacturer’s attempt to update it to the present day by adding digital features entails more than just a way of enhancing user possibilities and experiences. While Kodak advertises its new device with a statement that aims to exaggerate the impossibilities of the digital, it will be argued that Kodak’s new Super 8 film camera requires a theoretical thinking that moves beyond the analogue-digital divide as well as previous conceptualizations of (tech)nostalgia. [less ▲]

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See detailDoing Digital Hermeneutics in an Interdisciplinary Setting
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, October 25)

This contribution examines the conference theme from the perspective of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) in ‘Digital History and Hermeneutics’, a four-year interdisciplinary research and training program ... [more ▼]

This contribution examines the conference theme from the perspective of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) in ‘Digital History and Hermeneutics’, a four-year interdisciplinary research and training program funded by the Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR) and hosted by the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH) at the University of Luxembourg. The DTU is designed as an experimental platform for collaboration, in which thirteen doctoral candidates with different disciplinary backgrounds – from history, linguistics and philosophy to computer and information science – study and reflect on the epistemological and methodological implications of the ‘digital turn’ on historical research. The presentation takes a look back at the project’s first year, in which the doctoral candidates were introduced to various skills and methods in digital humanities, including text mining, digital source criticism, database structures, data visualization, GIS analysis, tool criticism and algorithmic critique. Based on experiences by the doctoral students themselves as reflected in semi-structured interviews, as well as drawing upon studies in interdisciplinarity, digital humanities, and the role of space(s) in scientific collaborations, the possibilities and challenges will be explored of doing digital history and hermeneutics in an interdisciplinary setting. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (9 UL)
See detailHome Movie Day 2018: van smalfilm tot selfie
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Home Movie Day at Eye Filmmuseum is an international tribute to the amateur film. This year, Home Movie Day highlights the history of amateur film which spans more than 100 years: from film strips to ... [more ▼]

Home Movie Day at Eye Filmmuseum is an international tribute to the amateur film. This year, Home Movie Day highlights the history of amateur film which spans more than 100 years: from film strips to selfies. How has the making and screening of amateur films and home movies changed in the past century? Who was filming? How and what did they film? And what role did the changing media landscape play? Eye celebrates the Home Movie Day on 20 October. The worldwide tribute to the amateur film has been organised every year since 2002, in countries such as the United States, Argentina and Japan. This edition, through the use of special objects and historical archive material, Home Movie Day zooms in on a number of drastic changes in amateur film. There was the rise of home video in the 1970s and 80s, and the transition from analogue to digital. The amateur and family filmer first filmed on a narrow film or Super8. After these transitions, there were plenty of new possibilities to capture daily life. On October 20 at 15.00 there is a lecture and presentation (90', in Dutch) in Eye in cooperation with Stichting Amateurfilm and the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision. The lecture will be held by Tim van der Heijden, media historian and board member of Stichting Amateurfilm. After the presentation, there is an opportunity to exchange information, ask questions and view the exhibited equipment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (5 UL)
See detailFrom the Dustbin of History: Rethinking the History of Amateur Media in a Historical Conversation
Aasman, Susan; van der Heijden, Tim UL; Slootweg, Tom

Scientific Conference (2018, August 23)

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would ... [more ▼]

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would favor a certain level of complexity as to avoid ‘sloppy media history’ even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them (137). Rather, we should explore how amateur filmmakers ‘doing and its do-ability’ can differ as they are situated in broader historical contexts. Building on this idea of a complex and dynamic history, that consists of a diversity of histories, we propose to start a semi-structured conversation between three experts in amateur media and between the experts and the audience. We seek to follow traces that connect or disconnect the various discourses and practices in amateur media history in which amateurism encountered predictions, hopes, and tried out appropriations of amateur media technologies as an alternative/marginal media space. The set of related concepts that will be deployed through time and in relation to different historical contexts are: marginality, democratization, resistance, alternative, avant-garde, subversive and experimental. By comparing, contrasting and evaluating these set of concepts we hope to add to the overall goal of the conference to open up a space to rethink historiography. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (6 UL)
See detailConceptualizing Tactics and Engagement in Amateur Media Practices: A Longue Durée Perspective
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 27)

This paper reflects on media tactics and engagement in amateur media practices from a longue durée perspective. More specifically, it addresses the question how discourses on and from users of different ... [more ▼]

This paper reflects on media tactics and engagement in amateur media practices from a longue durée perspective. More specifically, it addresses the question how discourses on and from users of different amateur and home movie technologies – from film via home video to digital media – reflect various forms of engagement, adaptation and resistance in amateur user practices. In the history of amateur filmmaking, a wide variety of users can be identified – from family filmmakers to cine-club hobbyists or even avant-garde artists. Differentiating not only between user types, but also between user generations, this paper argues, is helpful for understanding the user dynamics involved in so-called periods of transition, when the introduction of a new media technology brings about an (re)positioning of users vis-à-vis the new media technology’s affordances and constraints within its different contexts of use. Based on a historical discourse analysis of a wide variety of amateur photography, film and video magazines published between 1895 and 2005, the paper aims to provide both a conceptual and long-term historical reflection on this user dynamics involved in transitions of amateur media technologies and user practices. In total four periods of transition will be compared: the introduction of (1) small-gauge technologies in the 1920s and 1930s, (2) Super 8 film technologies in the 1960s, (3) home video technologies in the late 1970s and 1980s, and (4) digital media technologies in the 1990s and 2000s. Distinguishing between so-called ‘first-time users’, ‘adoptive users’ and ‘resistant users’ as together constituting a user generation in these four periods of transition, shows that while tactics and engagement involved in amateur media practices may take different forms throughout time, dependent on user types and contexts of use, actually various continuities (e.g. democratization discourses) and “historical hybridities” can be found in and between user generations of twentieth-century amateur media technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailEin trend spult die Zeit züruck. Die große Retro-Lust
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Panagl, Clemens

Article for general public (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 UL)
See detailHybrid Histories: Technologies of Memory and the Cultural Dynamics of Home Movies, 1895-2005 (presentation)
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, May 25)

In this presentation, I will present my PhD dissertation on the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. In my research, I have investigated how various generations have recorded their ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I will present my PhD dissertation on the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. In my research, I have investigated how various generations have recorded their memories on film, video and digital media, and, more specifically, how changes in these “technologies of memory” have shaped new forms of home movie making and screening. Covering the period from the invention of the film camera in the late nineteenth century, the introduction of 9.5mm, 16mm, 8mm small-gauges and Super 8 film technologies for amateurs, via home video to digital media technologies, this study addresses the complex interrelations between the materiality of film, video and digital media technologies, their social usages and cultural meanings from a long-term historical perspective. Focusing on specific periods of transition, it becomes clear that different media technologies, user practices and discourses not only succeed each other in time, but also increasingly interrelate, interact or even transform each other. Maintaining both a diachronic and a synchronic perspective on media transitions, I propose an alternative form of media historiography that rethinks media histories beyond the frameworks of change and continuity by perceiving hybridity as a constant factor in media historical development. [less ▲]

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See detailEen eeuw amateurfilm: van smalfilm tot selfie
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Ruim 100 jaar geleden begonnen de eerste amateurs zichzelf en hun omgeving vast te leggen in bewegend beeld. Tegenwoordig doet vrijwel iedereen dit met de smartphone, maar nog niet zo lang geleden ... [more ▼]

Ruim 100 jaar geleden begonnen de eerste amateurs zichzelf en hun omgeving vast te leggen in bewegend beeld. Tegenwoordig doet vrijwel iedereen dit met de smartphone, maar nog niet zo lang geleden behoorden het maken en vertonen van amateurfilms – ook wel ‘familiefilms’ of ‘home movies’ genoemd – enkel tot de welgestelde families en hobbyisten. Aan de hand van bijzonder archiefmateriaal en enkele sprekende fragmenten uit de fimcollectie van Het Utrechts Archief geeft mediahistoricus Tim van der Heijden in deze lezing inzicht in hoe het amateurfilmen in ruim een eeuw tijd is veranderd: van de eerste bewegende beelden vastgelegd op 9,5mm, 16mm en 8mm “smalfilm” tot aan de hedendaagse selfies. [less ▲]

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See detailHistoricizing Home Movie Practices: Two Complementary Perspectives
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Slootweg, Tom

Article for general public (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 UL)
See detailHybrid Histories: Technologies of Memory and the Cultural Dynamics of Home Movies, 1895-2005
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

This dissertation analyses the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. It investigates how various generations have recorded their family memories on film, video and digital media, and ... [more ▼]

This dissertation analyses the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. It investigates how various generations have recorded their family memories on film, video and digital media, and, more specifically, how changes in these “technologies of memory” have shaped new forms of home movie making and screening. Covering the period from the invention of the film camera in the late nineteenth century, the introduction of 9.5mm, 16mm, 8mm small-gauges and Super 8 film technologies for amateurs, via home video to digital media technologies, this study addresses the complex interrelations between the materiality of film, video and digital media technologies, their social usages and cultural meanings from a long-term historical perspective. Focusing on specific periods of transition, it becomes clear that different media technologies, user practices and discourses not only succeed each other in time, but also increasingly interrelate, interact or even transform each other. Maintaining both a diachronic and a synchronic perspective on media transitions, this dissertation proposes an alternative form of media historiography that rethinks media histories beyond the frameworks of change and continuity by perceiving hybridity as a constant factor in media historical development. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailHybrid Histories: Historicizing the Home Movie Dispositif
van der Heijden, Tim UL

in Aasman, Susan; Fickers, Andreas; Wachelder, Joseph (Eds.) Materializing Memories: Dispositifs, Generations, Amateurs (2018)

In media historiography, there have generally been two approaches to historicize past media technologies and their practices. Whereas media historians generally focus on historical changes by maintaining ... [more ▼]

In media historiography, there have generally been two approaches to historicize past media technologies and their practices. Whereas media historians generally focus on historical changes by maintaining a diachronic perspective on how media technologies and practices develop over time, media archaeologists commonly adopt a synchronic perspective in (re)constructing parallel or alternative histories. This chapter aims to explore and propose a third approach to media historiography, which departs from the notion of “hybridity”: the intermingling and co-existence of old and new media technologies, user practices, and discourses as evolving in an ongoing process. Building on some of the empirical and conceptual results of my research on the home movie as a twentieth-century family memory practice, I develop the argument that a “hybrid media historiography” enables one to grasp the complex interrelations and dynamics between media technologies, user practices, and discourses in more precise and comprehensive ways by maintaining both a diachronic and synchronic perspective in studying media transitions. By looking specifically at how the transition from amateur film to home video gradually constituted a new home movie dispositif in the 1970s and 1980s, I will underline the heuristic potential of hybridity as analytical lens in media historical research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (2 UL)
See detailHistoricizing the Home Movie Dispositif: Reflections from the Longue Durée
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2017, June 30)

This paper reflects on the cultural dynamics of the home movie as a twentieth century family memory practice. Over the years, many generations have documented and materialized their family memories on ... [more ▼]

This paper reflects on the cultural dynamics of the home movie as a twentieth century family memory practice. Over the years, many generations have documented and materialized their family memories on film, video and digital media. While the making and screening of family films used to be a rather exclusive hobby practiced only by the elite, this has changed considerably in today’s ubiquitous sharing cultures. In my research, I have examined from a longue durée perspective how changes in platforms of memory production and dissemination – from the first amateur film apparatuses to today’s smartphones – have shaped new forms of home movie making and screening. Exploring more than a century of family memory practices, I have systematically investigated the dynamic relationship between new memory technologies, their narrative and aesthetic forms, and the changing meanings of home movies in their social and cultural contexts of use. To historicize these transformations of the home movie dispositif, I distinguished between four specific historical periods of transition, each heralded by the arrival of a new memory technology: 9.5mm, 16mm and 8mm ‘small-gauges’ in the 1920s and 1930s; Super 8 and Single 8 ‘cassette-film’ formats in the 1960s; home video technologies in the late 1970s and 1980s; and digital media technologies in the 1990s and 2000s. The paper provides both empirical and conceptual reflections on this long-term media historical research. I argue that in order to faithfully study media technologies and mediated practices in their permanent state of transition, we need to de-essentialize the notion of dispositif and rethink media histories beyond their traditional narratives of change and continuity. Scholars interested in long-term media historical development therefore may consider, I propose, a radical process-oriented approach in which hybridity no longer forms an exception, but rather a new way of thinking about media history in general. [less ▲]

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See detailStaging the Amateur Film Dispositif: A Media Archaeological Experiment
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2017, June 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnostalgia of the Present: From Technologies of Memory to a Memory of Technologies
van der Heijden, Tim UL

in NECSUS. European Journal of Media Studies (2015), 4(2), 103-121

This article reflects on today’s ‘technostalgic’ trend in media culture by examining the various ways in which Super 8 film as a media technology from the past is re-appropriated and remediated in ... [more ▼]

This article reflects on today’s ‘technostalgic’ trend in media culture by examining the various ways in which Super 8 film as a media technology from the past is re-appropriated and remediated in contemporary memory practices. By looking specifically at restorative and reflective forms of technostalgia manifest in the project Bye Bye Super 8 – In Loving Memory of Kodachrome (2011) and the digital smartphone app iSupr8 (2011), the author explores how in contemporary memory practices media technologies not only construct and mediate memories but have also become the objects of memory themselves. While analysing this double mnemonic process – accounting for both the memory construction by the media technology and the reminiscence of the media technology itself – it is argued that we currently witness a new kind of memory practice enforcing an attentive shift from technologies of memory to a memory of technologies. [less ▲]

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See detail‘Voor ik vergeet’. Spinvis en het potentieel van reflexieve technostalgie
van der Heijden, Tim UL

in Andeweg, Agnes; Wesseling, Lies (Eds.) Wat de verbeelding niet vermag! Essays bij het afscheid van Maaike Meijer (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (0 UL)