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See detailConsolidating Observation of Land and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Hibbert, Angela et al

Poster (2019, December 13)

With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. Since 2013 the tide gauge at King Edward Point ... [more ▼]

With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. Since 2013 the tide gauge at King Edward Point (KEP) with GLOSS ID 187 has been monitored using a GNSS station nearby on Brown Mountain. By accurately geo-referencing the tide gauge and monitoring any vertical land movements, a continuous record of its datum within the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) can be established, which in turn makes the recorded and averaged sea levels useful for long-term studies and satellite altimetry calibrations. In 2014 another GNSS station was installed at KEP after local subsidence was sus-pected and later on three additional GNSS stations came to service at the periphery of the main island, making it possible to monitor uplift/subsidence wider afield. Further-more, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, i.e. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the results from the GNSS and precise levelling meas-urements, and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge and nearby satellite altimetry sea surface heights. This study comes at a timely manner as during the Austral Summer 2019/2020 the jetty will be stabilized and en-larged, and consequently the current tide gauge will be replaced by a new one. Our measurements show that uplift is observed all over South Georgia Island while the ar-ea at KEP and particularly the jetty with tide gauge are subsiding relative to the rest of the island. In contrast, results for the tide gauge record show a lower magnitude of ob-served sea level rise than expected from nearby satellite altimetry. We will revisit all geodetic and oceanic observations in an attempt to improve the agreement between these measurements to summarize the status before the work at the jetty begins. [less ▲]

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See detailVertical Land Movements and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Abraha, Kibrom Ebuy UL et al

Poster (2018, April 09)

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean is a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean is a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by mountain glaciers which have been reported to be retreating due to climatic change. Furthermore, during past glaciation periods the island and its shelf area have been ice covered as was revealed by scarring of the sub-oceanic topography. Together with ongoing tectonics along the North Scotia Ridge, these processes have the ability to produce significant uplift on local to regional scales, affecting the measurements of the tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) at King Edward Point (KEP). Furthermore, with its mid-ocean location, the tide gauge is of particular interest to satellite altimetry calibrations over the Southern Atlantic and Southern Oceans. With the establishment of five GNSS stations on the islands during 2013 to 2015 and the scientific analysis of these data within the global network of stations of the International GNSS Service Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) working group, it has now become possible to study present-day vertical land movements of the region and their impacts on, for example, regional sea level. Furthermore, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, ie. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the still preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding, leading to a disagreement in the observed sea level change from the tide gauge and satellite altimetry. In order to improve the agreement between these sea level measurements both local and regional vertical land movements need to be monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Vertical Land Movement Estimates on South Georgia Island: An Impact Study on Sea Level Change from Tide Gauge and Altimetry Measurements
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Abraha, Kibrom Ebuy UL et al

Poster (2017, December 11)

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean has been a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. However, no permanent geodetic monitoring station had been ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean has been a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. However, no permanent geodetic monitoring station had been established there despite the lack of observations from this region within, for example, the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. Then, in 2013 the King Edward Point (KEP) Geodetic Observatory was established with a focus on sea level studies and in support of general geoscience applications. Currently, this observatory located roughly half-way along the main island and along its northern coastline, consists of two GNSS stations (KEPA and KRSA) with local benchmark networks, allowing the height determinations from the GNSS antennas to be transferred to the KEP tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) and forming a height reference within the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. In late 2014, three additional GNSS stations (SG01, SG02 and SG03) were established, all on small islands at the perimeter of the main island. Together the stations provide the best possible opportunity to study various geophysical processes in the region. With the GNSS-derived position time series partly reaching over 4.5 years in length, it has become possible to provide first estimates of vertical land movements for the island and KEP with its surrounding area. Together with four precise levelling campaigns of the benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions, ie. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding. In this study, we will present the preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge which is ideally situated in a mid-ocean location for satellite altimetry calibration over the Southern Atlantic and Southern Oceans. [less ▲]

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See detailPotential Contributions to Geoscience from GNSS Observations of the King Edward Point Geodetic Observatory, South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Ahmed, Furqan UL et al

Poster (2013, September 01)

During February 2013 the King Edward Point (KEP) Geodetic Observatory was established in South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean, through a University of Luxembourg funded research project and in ... [more ▼]

During February 2013 the King Edward Point (KEP) Geodetic Observatory was established in South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean, through a University of Luxembourg funded research project and in collaboration with the United Kingdom’s National Oceanography Centre, British Antarctic Survey and Unavco, Inc. Due to its remote location in the South Atlantic Ocean, as well as, being one of few subaerial exposures of the Scotia plate, South Georgia Island has been a key location for a number of global monitoring networks, e.g. seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic. However, no geodetic monitoring station has been established, e.g. by the International Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service (IGS) community, despite the lack of such observations from this region. In this study we will present an evaluation of the GNSS observations from the KEP Geodetic Observatory for the period from February to August 2013. We calculate multipath and positioning statistics and compare these to those from IGS stations. The on-site meteorological data is compared to those from the nearby KEP meteorological station and global numerical weather models, and the impact of these data sets on delay and integrated water vapour estimates will be evaluated. We will discuss the installation in terms of its potential contributions to sea level observations using tide gauges and satellite altimetry, studies of tectonics, glacio-isostatic adjustment and atmospheric processes. [less ▲]

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