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See detailSuicidal Behaviour in Youth in Luxembourg - Findings from the HBSC 2014 Luxembourg Study
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Report (2020)

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. In order to prevent suicides, early identification of groups at risk is needed. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study, data on ... [more ▼]

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. In order to prevent suicides, early identification of groups at risk is needed. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study, data on suicidal behaviours among adolescents were collected in 2006, 2010 and 2014. These can be used to identify suicide risk factors and to develop comprehensive suicide prevention programs. In Luxembourg, the suicide rate has fluctuated around 15 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants per year, for more than ten years. In the period 2006 – 2016, 20 deaths were registered as suicide in the age group of 10 to 19-year-olds. These suicides represent approximately 19% of all deaths registered in this age group. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study conducted in 2014, 875 adolescents indicated to have contemplated suicide in the last 12 months, which amounts to 15.1% of the adolescents in the study. In the same year, 811 adolescents (14.0%) indicated to have made a suicide plan in the last 12 months, and 448 adolescents (7.7%) to have attempted suicide (at least once) in the last year. In first instance, bivariate logistic regressions analyses were conducted for 24 independent variables with three suicidal behaviours (contemplation of suicide, planning of suicide and suicide attempt) and sadness as dependent variables in order to identify potential risk factors. These risk factors were further tested in multivariate logistic regressions, in order to make a statement about the relevance of these factors for suicidal behaviour of adolescents in Luxembourg, while taking into account the dependence between the risk factors. Results from multivariate logistic regressions indicate that subjective health complaints are the most important risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Adolescents who have recurrent multiple health complaints are at higher risk for suicidal behaviour than adolescents who do not have health complaints. Life satisfaction is the second most important risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Adolescents with lower levels of life satisfaction are at higher risk for suicidal behaviour than adolescents who have higher levels of life satisfaction. Gender-specific analyses show that the risk factors differ between girls and boys for suicidal behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends from 2006-2018 in Health, Health Behaviour, Health Outcomes and Social Context of Adolescents in Luxembourg
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

Report (2020)

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils ... [more ▼]

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils: they smoke less and drink less alcohol. They also report more frequently that they brush their teeth regularly, eat more fruit and fewer sweets and consume fewer soft drinks. From 2006-2018, however, there were also deteriorations. For example, more pupils feel stressed from school and rate the climate among classmates worse. In addition, there are more pupils who are overweight and exercise less and more pupils report having psychosomatic health complaints. [less ▲]

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See detailSchool-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(2),

Although the school-class is known to be an important setting for adolescent risk behavior, little is known about how the ethnic composition of a school-class impacts substance use among pupils with a ... [more ▼]

Although the school-class is known to be an important setting for adolescent risk behavior, little is known about how the ethnic composition of a school-class impacts substance use among pupils with a migration background. Moreover, the few existing studies do not distinguish between co-ethnic density (i.e., the share of immigrants belonging to one’s own ethnic group) and immigrant density (the share of all immigrants). This is all the more surprising since a high co-ethnic density can be expected to protect against substance use by increasing levels of social support and decreasing acculturative stress, whereas a high immigrant density can be expected to do the opposite by facilitating inter-ethnic conflict and identity threat. This study analyses how co-ethnic density and immigrant density are correlated with smoking among pupils of Portuguese origin in Luxembourg. A multi-level analysis is used to analyze data from the Luxembourg Health Behavior in School-Aged Children study (N = 4268 pupils from 283 classes). High levels of co-ethnic density reduced current smoking. In contrast, high levels of immigrant density increased it. Thus, in research on the health of migrants, the distinction between co-ethnic density and immigrant density should be taken into account, as both may have opposite effects. [less ▲]

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See detailSuicide Prevention: Using the Number of Health Complaints as an Indirect Alternative for Screening Suicidal Adolescents
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2020), 260

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies ... [more ▼]

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies and situations. To avoid directly addressing suicide, this paper investigates whether the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Symptom Checklist (HBSC-SCL), a validated non-clinical measure of eight subjective health complaints (e.g. headache, feeling low), could be used as a tool for screening suicidal ideation and behavior in adolescents. Methods: 5262 secondary school students aged 12-18 answered the Luxembourgish HBSC 2014 survey, including the HBSC-SCL items and suicidal ideation and behavior questions. Results: Each HBSC-SCL item correlates with suicidal ideation and behavior. A sum score was calculated ranging from zero to eight health complaints to predict respondents who considered suicide (area under the ROC curve = .770). The ideal cut-off for screening students who consider suicide is three or more health complaints: sensitivity is 66.3%, specificity is 75.9% and positive predictive value is 32.9%. Limitations: One limitation is HBSC-SCL's low positive predictive value. This is a general problem of screening rare events: the lower the prevalence, the lower the positive predictive value. Sensitivity and specificity could be improved by taking age-, gender- and country-specific cut-off values, but such refinements would make the score calculation more complicated. Conclusions: The HBSC-SCL is short, easy to use, with satisfactory screening properties. The checklist can be used when suicide cannot be addressed directly, and also in a more general context, e.g. by school nurses when screening adolescents. [less ▲]

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See detailPolitische Orientierungen und das Verhältnis zu Gewalt bei linksaffinen Jugendlichen
Kühnel, Wolfgang; Willems, Helmut UL

in Meinhardt, Anne-Kathrin; Redlich, Birgit (Eds.) Linke Militanz. Pädagogische Arbeit in Theorie und Praxis (2020)

Weshalb engagieren sich junge Menschen in politischen Gruppen und sozialen Bewegungen? Welche gesellschaftlichen und politischen Ziele verfolgen sie? Wie legitimieren sie Gewalt und welche Erfahrungen ... [more ▼]

Weshalb engagieren sich junge Menschen in politischen Gruppen und sozialen Bewegungen? Welche gesellschaftlichen und politischen Ziele verfolgen sie? Wie legitimieren sie Gewalt und welche Erfahrungen machen sie mit ihr? [less ▲]

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See detailDer Wandel der jugendpolitischen Agenda und die Konsequenzen für die Konzeption der Lebensphase Jugend. Eine Analyse am Beispiel von Jugendpolitik in Luxemburg
Heinen, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in Heinen, Andreas; Wiezorek, Christine; Willems, Helmut (Eds.) Entgrenzung der Jugend und Verjugendlichung der Gesellschaft. Zur Notwendigkeit einer »Neuvermessung« jugendtheoretischer Positionen (2020)

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See detailHistorische Entwicklungen und aktuelle Themen der Jugendpolitik und Jugendhilfe in Luxemburg
Willems, Helmut UL; Biewers, Sandra UL; Heinen, Andreas UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailCommunication with father and mother differently impacts suicidal behaviour
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Poster (2019, September)

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents ... [more ▼]

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents are more likely to display suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study is to find out whether communication with the father or mother is equally important for suicidal behaviour. Methods: A total of 5595 students aged from 12 to 18 years old in secondary school participated in the 2014 HBSC Luxembourg survey. They responded to a questionnaire including, among others: 4 questions regarding sadness, suicide ideation, planning and attempt, and 2 questions about ease of communication with their father and mother. Findings: Adolescents who indicate poorer communication with their mother or father have higher odds for all suicidal behaviours. Poor communication with fathers has a bigger influence on the odds for sadness, whereas poor communication with mothers has a bigger influence on the odds for attempted suicide. Lastly, adolescents who don`t have or don`t see their mother or father are at increased risk for the suicidal behaviours, although the odds are not as high as for those indicating very difficult communication with their parent(s). Discussion: The Luxembourgish findings confirm the results of previous research and go further showing that, as a determinant, communication with mother differs from the communication with father. More studies should confirm these findings and include other variables, such as social support and stress, in order to see their relation with the communication with both parental figures and suicidal behaviours. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in cannabis consumption among youth in Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other ... [more ▼]

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other psychoactive drugs. The current study presents trends in cannabis consumption among adolescents in Luxembourg. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School Aged Children (HBSC) Study in Luxembourg collected data in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 using a standardized paper-pencil questionnaire. In total, 23,346 secondary schools students aged 11 to 18 years old (M=15.51, SD=1.53) responded to questions on cannabis, tobacco and alcohol consumption (lifetime and the past 30 days). Findings: In general, students who never used cannabis significantly increased over the four HBSC study waves (78%, 81.2%, 81%, 84%), whereas trends are similar for boys (74.5%, 77%, 78.2%, 81.4%), but not for girls (81.5%, 85%, 83.2%, 86.3%). Cannabis use (past 30 days) significantly differ for girls (94.1%, 94.1%, 92.8%, 93.7%), but not in general (91.7%, 92%, 90.9%, 91.7%), neither for boys (89.3%, 90.1%, 88.6%, 89.6%). Discussion: Cannabis lifetime use remains high for both genders. While consumption in the last 30 days remained stable for boys, it increased for girls over the past years. Tailored preventive interventions, based on health psychological models, are essential to educate adolescents about the social-cognitive risks of cannabis use and strengthen their capacities and resilience to resist experimental drug use and social pressure. In a context where legalization policies are discussed in various European countries, e-health approaches, for example, could be widely implemented in a cost-effective manner. [less ▲]

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See detail"Are you a boy or girl?" Who are the non-responders
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 20)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Objective: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: HBSC 2018 raw data from Ireland, Luxembourg, Belgium and France are compared. To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both sociodemographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: Between 0.8% (Ireland) and 1.2% (Luxembourg) of participants did not report their gender. About half of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other half belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower life satisfaction, lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less peer support and their WHO-5 Well-being score is lower. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. Implication: The question arises whether the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and whether the question on gender should be asked differently in the future. [less ▲]

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See detail„What’s a normal weight?“ – Weight assessment standards in Origin- and Receiving Country and Immigrant Adolescents’ Weight-Status Self-Assessment
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 19)

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight ... [more ▼]

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight-status misperception differs considerably cross-nationally, indicating that individual weight-status assessment is informed by culturally transmitted standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the problem of multiple frames of reference, as their perception of weight-status may be influenced by different cultural standards. Objective: We investigate the extent to which the assessment of one's own weight-status is based on standards of the heritage country or the receiving country. Methods: Data are retrieved from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41 countries and subsequently identify a large sample of 8132 immigrant adolescents in 23 receiving countries from 41 heritage countries. The influence of heritage- and receiving country standards of evaluation was assessed using cross-classified multilevel models. Results: Descriptive analyses reveal considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. We find evidence of a significant influence of both heritage- and receiving culture standards of evaluation, with a stronger impact of receiving culture standards. Stratified analyses reveal a stronger influence of heritage culture standards among first- than among second-generation immigrants, and a stronger influence of receiving culture standards among second- than among first-generation immigrants. Conclusions: The results corroborate our expectations regarding the persistency of cultural standards and help to understand inter-ethnic differences in weight-status assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailIs Life Satisfaction Contagious?
Catunda, Carolina UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June)

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences ... [more ▼]

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences adolescents LS. In addition, the social network can affect health-related behaviors of adults - individuals that smoke or exercise tend to group together. However, the effects of others` LS on adolescents’ individual evaluation of LS (the contagion hypothesis) is still to be addressed. Objective(s): To test the contagion hypothesis of adolescents’ life satisfaction (how LS of proxies influences the individual LS appraisal). Method: Data is from 9738 students (aged 9-20) from the 2018 HBSC Luxembourg survey. A multilevel analysis was used to evaluate LS, with the school classes as subjects (model 1) to estimate the influence of being in a certain school class. Later, FAS, age and gender were entered as control variables (model 2). Results: The grand mean (intercept) for LS in model 1 was 7.57 (SE=.03, p<.001). For model 2, FAS (b=.47, SE=.03, p<.001), age (b=-.14, SE=.01, p<.001) and gender (b=-.23, SE=.04, p<.001) were significantly predictive of LS. The grand mean for LS, conditioned on the presence of FAS, age and gender, was 9.02 (SE=.05, p<.001). Interclass Correlation Coefficient decreased from model 1 (ICC=.08) to model 2 (ICC=.04). Conclusions: Results suggest that part of the variance of LS can be explained by the school class level. In other words, school class clusters have an influence on their LS, indicating that the LS of adolescents from a class partially accounts for individual LS. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychometrical Properties of a French Version of the General Self-Efficacy Short Scale (ASKU)
Décieux, Jean Philippe; Sischka, Philipp UL; Schumacher, Anette UL et al

in Swiss Journal of Psychology (2019)

General self-efficacy is a central personality trait often evaluated in surveys as context variable. It can be interpreted as a personal coping resource reflecting individual belief in one’s overall ... [more ▼]

General self-efficacy is a central personality trait often evaluated in surveys as context variable. It can be interpreted as a personal coping resource reflecting individual belief in one’s overall competence to perform across a variety of situations. The German-language Allgemeine-Selbstwirksamkeit-Kurzskala (ASKU) is a reliable and valid instrument to assess this disposition in the German-speaking countries based on a three-item equation. This study develops a French version of the ASKU and tests this French version for measurement invariance compared to the original ASKU. A reliable and valid French instrument would make it easy to collect data in the French-speaking countries and allow comparisons between the French and German results. Data were collected on a sample of 1,716 adolescents. Confirmatory factor analysis resulted in a good fit for a single-factor model of the data (in total, French, and German version). Additionally, construct validity was assessed by elucidating intercorrelations between the ASKU and different factors that should theoretically be related to ASKU. Furthermore, we confirmed configural and metric as well as scalar invariance between the different language versions, meaning that all forms of statistical comparison between the developed French version and the original German version are allowed. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing data from the HBSC study for evidence-based suicide prevention in Luxembourg
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL et al

in European Journal of Public Health (2019), 29

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