References of "Wayessa, Gutu Olana 50003305"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailAnalyzing society-nature interactions: Political-ecological frameworks
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2016, March 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
See detailMixed-methods approach in environmental social sciences
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2016, March 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhose Decisions, Whose Livelihoods? Resettlement and Environmental Justice in Ethiopia
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL; Nygren, Anja

in Society and Natural Resources (2015), 29(4), 387-402

This article analyzes recent state-implemented resettlement schemes in Oromia, Ethiopia, by examining the experiences and outcomes of resettlement from the perspective of both the resettlers and hosts ... [more ▼]

This article analyzes recent state-implemented resettlement schemes in Oromia, Ethiopia, by examining the experiences and outcomes of resettlement from the perspective of both the resettlers and hosts. Besides involving transformations in people’s access to resources and the ability to earn their livelihoods, resettlement invites deep-seated questions of governance and justice. Drawing on theoretical approaches of political ecology and environmental justice, we analyse the processes and outcomes of resettlement in terms of four interlinked dimensions, including resource (re)distribution, cultural recognition, political representation, and social recovery. Special attention is paid to the questions of who decides for whom, and who lives the consequences. The analysis is based on a mixed-methods approach, involving a combination of qualitative interviews and a quantitative survey. We conclude that both the resettlers and the hosts experienced uneven redistribution of resources and unfair forms of recognition and political representation, which in tandem limited their possibilities for social recovery. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 203 (7 UL)
See detailMixed-Methods Approach
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2015, May 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (0 UL)
See detailRegional Integration and Development in Africa
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2014, October 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
See detailMixed-Methods Approach in Development Studies: Understanding and Explaining Processes and Outcomes of State-sponsored Resettlement in Ethiopia
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Scientific Conference (2014, June 28)

Drawing on empirical examples of livelihood changes associated with state-sponsored resettlement scheme in Western Oromia, Ethiopia, this paper aims to make a methodological contribution on the advantages ... [more ▼]

Drawing on empirical examples of livelihood changes associated with state-sponsored resettlement scheme in Western Oromia, Ethiopia, this paper aims to make a methodological contribution on the advantages of integrating qualitative and quantitative methods. It demonstrates the complementary roles of qualitative and quantitative methods at various stages of the research process, notably at the stages of data collection, and analysis and interpretation. It highlights that development research could benefit from employing a mixed-methods approach. At a general level, the paper conveys the message that understanding and explaining processes and outcomes of development interventions is aided by combining quantitative and qualitative methods. Specific to livelihood changes associated with resettlement, quantitative methods enable us to quantify the changes and, thereby, specify the magnitude of the resettlement scheme’s impacts. However, what these changes mean as perceived and expressed by the subjects of the study is vital and can only be addressed through an approach that embraces qualitative methods. This is because qualitative methods are good at capturing contextual and subjective meanings of social phenomena. Moreover, the application of mixed methods enables us address the statistical and substantive significant of the variables under study and enhance the policy relevance of the findings. One method thus complements the other in meaningful ways. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 134 (0 UL)
See detailDilemmas of/for Development: Displacement and Resettlement
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2014, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (1 UL)
See detailApplication of Theory/Theories in Development Studies: An Approach
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2013, September 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences: A Theoretical Review of Possibilities and Challenges
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

in The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies (2013), 7(2), 131-141

Questions concerning the nature of reality (ontology), how reality should be researched (methodology), and what constitutes meaningful knowledge (epistemology) not merely invite philosophical ... [more ▼]

Questions concerning the nature of reality (ontology), how reality should be researched (methodology), and what constitutes meaningful knowledge (epistemology) not merely invite philosophical deliberations, but also have practical implications. The paper argues that ontological and epistemological positions often inform methodological choices. Certain methodological selections are reinforced by certain perspectives on philosophical questions as to what constitutes science and what qualifies as a scientific research. From a critical-realist perspective, this paper reflects on ontological and epistemological implications of qualitative-quantitative divide and presents the arguments for and against combining qualitative and quantitative methods. While arguing for mainstreaming mixed-methods approach as a viable alternative in social sciences, the paper also discusses possible challenges of the approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailDisplacement and Resettlement: The Livelihoods of Resettlers and Hosts Displacement and Resettlement: The Livelihoods of Resettlers and Hosts
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Doctoral thesis (2013)

The study focuses on population displacement and the livelihood implications of state-planned resettlement schemes that have been implemented in Western Oromia, Ethiopia. It addresses the livelihoods of ... [more ▼]

The study focuses on population displacement and the livelihood implications of state-planned resettlement schemes that have been implemented in Western Oromia, Ethiopia. It addresses the livelihoods of both the resettlers and the hosts. Although such resettlements have been implemented in the country since the 1960s, this study addresses those carried out since 2003. The broad objective of the study was to explore the dynamics of displacement and resettlement, and their impacts on the livelihoods of resettler and host populations. The specific objectives were: (1) to assess the policies and practices of the resettlement program carried out during the tenure of the current government; (2) to analyze the livelihood outcomes of the resettlements for resettlers and hosts in terms of changes in access to livelihood resources and social services; and (3) to examine resettlers’ and hosts’ perceptions of and attitudes towards the resettlement program. The theory of impoverishment risks and livelihood reconstruction (IRLR), the sustainable livelihood framework (SLF), and political ecology constitute the pillars of the theoretical framework. Primary data were collected in 2009 through a survey of 630 households in eight resettlement sites, and 68 thematic (group and individual) interviews in 13 resettlement sites. Several interviews were also held with government officials. Households were selected for the survey through stratified random sampling, whereas informants were selected for the interviews purposively. The primary data were complemented with relevant secondary data. The study is interdisciplinary, and combines both qualitative and quantitative methods through a concurrent mixed-methods design. Qualitative methods were used to address how and why questions through thematic analysis of the interviews and policy documents, thereby illuminating the substantive significance of the issues at stake. Quantitative methods were employed to quantify changes and establish the statistical significance of variables of interest. The quantitative methods used include descriptive statistics, such as percentages, means and cross-tabulations, and inferential statistics, such as logistic regression, mean comparisons using non-parametric tests, factor analysis, Chi-square tests, and loglinear analysis. The complementary relation between the two methods has proved useful in understanding and explaining the processes and the outcomes of the resettlement scheme. The research illuminates the causes, the processes, and the outcomes of the current resettlement program in particular, and critically analyzes the assumptions underlying the resettlement policies of the current and the previous regimes in general. Multiple causes and assumptions underlay the resettlement scheme, most notably land and rainfall shortages in resettlers’ areas of origin, and the government’s claim of land abundance. This last assumption has been persistently made by regime after regime, despite empirical counter-evidence, as also shown in this study. By revealing that the scheme resulted in the displacement of the host population to make way for resettlement, that the resettlers were given less land than promised, and that the relocation led to serious conflicts and disputes over land between resettlers and hosts, the study challenges the state’s supposition and rhetoric of “ample land.” The evidence also illuminates the relocation’s glaring lack of inclusiveness of both resettlers and hosts, despite the benign principles of “voluntarism” and “consultation.” The outcomes were multiple, leaving some better-off, others worse-off, and still others with no noticeable livelihood deterioration or improvement. In cases where old problems were alleviated, new ones emerged in a context of little plan and capacity to meet contingencies. This calls into question government propagation of generalized “success” in the resettlement scheme. Although little is known about the sustainability of the improved outcomes for some resettlers in some resettlement sites, the evidence from this study also counteracts the depiction of the scheme as a general “failure.” The findings suggest that the relative importance of the risks experienced by the resettlers and the hosts varied between the two population groups, and among different resettlement sites. The resettlement sites were widely differentiated in terms of biophysical factors, notably soil fertility and the availability of grazing land. This has serious implications for the resettlers and the hosts as their livelihoods are almost entirely based on agricultural activities. Moreover, historical issues, wider socio-political structures, physical infrastructure, and resettler-host relations are crucial for the understanding of how people’s access to livelihood resources and social services is shaped. However, resettler-host relations should be seen in a broader context of state-society relations, as the state is a key actor in planning and implementing the resettlement programs. An important policy lesson from this study is that when one focuses on certain livelihood aspects, one also needs to be aware that other potential livelihood components not evident today may become vital in the future. This awareness should motivate adaptive planning and management to meet contingencies in a way that reflects the multifaceted nature of livelihoods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 202 (4 UL)
See detailMixed-Methods Approach in Displacement/Migration Studies
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

Presentation (2012, October 31)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProcedural Justice and Livelihood-Outcome Justice: A Framework for Analyzing Attitudes of Resettlers and Hosts towards Resettlement
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL

in The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (2010), 5(8), 477-492

Based on social psychology and development-related literature, this paper presents a framework for analyzing people’s attitudes towards a resettlement program. It hypothesizes that the attitudes of ... [more ▼]

Based on social psychology and development-related literature, this paper presents a framework for analyzing people’s attitudes towards a resettlement program. It hypothesizes that the attitudes of resettlers and hosts towards a resettlement policy and practice is a function of perceived procedural justice, perceived livelihood-outcome justice, and the interaction between the two. While procedural justice refers to the fairness of the procedure with which a resettlement program is planned and implemented, livelihood-outcome justice concerns the livelihood dynamics experienced by the people because of and since the resettlement. It is argued that, in assessment of attitudes towards a resettlement scheme, one has to account for the contribution of not only the main effects of procedural and outcome variables, but also their interaction effect. The paper also highlights some issues that are worth taking into account when applying the concepts as analytical categories in development studies. There are philosophical and pragmatic grounds for the need to assess development policies and practices from the perspectives of “beneficiaries,” who are the ultimate and direct bearers of the consequences of such policies and practices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (0 UL)