References of "Wagner, Christian 50014254"
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See detailThe Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Its Relation to Cell Shape and Rigidity of Red Blood Cells from Chorea-Acanthocytosis Patients in an Off-Label Treatment with Dasatinib.
Rabe, Antonia; Kihm, Alexander; Darras, Alexis et al

in Biomolecules (2021), 11(5),

BACKGROUND: Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disease with deformed red blood cells (RBCs), so-called acanthocytes, as a typical marker of the disease. Erythrocyte ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disease with deformed red blood cells (RBCs), so-called acanthocytes, as a typical marker of the disease. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was recently proposed as a diagnostic biomarker. To date, there is no treatment option for affected patients, but promising therapy candidates, such as dasatinib, a Lyn-kinase inhibitor, have been identified. METHODS: RBCs of two ChAc patients during and after dasatinib treatment were characterized by the ESR, clinical hematology parameters and the 3D shape classification in stasis based on an artificial neural network. Furthermore, mathematical modeling was performed to understand the contribution of cell morphology and cell rigidity to the ESR. Microfluidic measurements were used to compare the RBC rigidity between ChAc patients and healthy controls. RESULTS: The mechano-morphological characterization of RBCs from two ChAc patients in an off-label treatment with dasatinib revealed differences in the ESR and the acanthocyte count during and after the treatment period, which could not directly be related to each other. Clinical hematology parameters were in the normal range. Mathematical modeling indicated that RBC rigidity is more important for delayed ESR than cell shape. Microfluidic experiments confirmed a higher rigidity in the normocytes of ChAc patients compared to healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: The results increase our understanding of the role of acanthocytes and their associated properties in the ESR, but the data are too sparse to answer the question of whether the ESR is a suitable biomarker for treatment success, whereas a correlation between hematological and neuronal phenotype is still subject to verification. [less ▲]

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See detailRed blood cell phenotyping from 3D confocal images using artificial neural networks.
Simionato, Greta; Hinkelmann, Konrad; Chachanidze, Revaz et al

in PLoS computational biology (2021), 17(5), 1008934

The investigation of cell shapes mostly relies on the manual classification of 2D images, causing a subjective and time consuming evaluation based on a portion of the cell surface. We present a dual-stage ... [more ▼]

The investigation of cell shapes mostly relies on the manual classification of 2D images, causing a subjective and time consuming evaluation based on a portion of the cell surface. We present a dual-stage neural network architecture for analyzing fine shape details from confocal microscopy recordings in 3D. The system, tested on red blood cells, uses training data from both healthy donors and patients with a congenital blood disease, namely hereditary spherocytosis. Characteristic shape features are revealed from the spherical harmonics spectrum of each cell and are automatically processed to create a reproducible and unbiased shape recognition and classification. The results show the relation between the particular genetic mutation causing the disease and the shape profile. With the obtained 3D phenotypes, we suggest our method for diagnostics and theragnostics of blood diseases. Besides the application employed in this study, our algorithms can be easily adapted for the 3D shape phenotyping of other cell types and extend their use to other applications, such as industrial automated 3D quality control. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Vitro Red Blood Cell Segregation in Sickle Cell Anemia
Claveria, Viviana; Connes, Philippe; Lanotte, Luca et al

in FRONTIERS IN PHYSICS (2021), 9

Red blood cells in sickle cell anemia (sRBC) are more heterogeneous in their physical properties than healthy red blood cells, spanning adhesiveness, rigidity, density, size, and shape. sRBC with ... [more ▼]

Red blood cells in sickle cell anemia (sRBC) are more heterogeneous in their physical properties than healthy red blood cells, spanning adhesiveness, rigidity, density, size, and shape. sRBC with increased adhesiveness to the vascular wall would trigger vaso-occlusive like complications, a hallmark of sickle cell anemia. We investigated whether segregation occurs among sRBC flowing in micron-sized channels and tested the impact of aggregation on segregation. Two populations of sRBC of different densities were separated, labeled, and mixed again. The mixed suspension was flowed within glass capillary tubes at different pressure-drops, hematocrit, and suspending media that promoted or not cell aggregation. Observations were made at a fixed channel position. The mean flow velocity was obtained by using the cells as tracking particles, and the cell depleted layer (CDL) by measuring the distance from the cell core border to the channel wall. The labeled sRBC were identified by stopping the flow and scanning the cells within the channel section. The tube hematocrit was estimated from the number of fluorescence cells identified in the field of view. In non-aggregating media, our results showed a heterogeneous distribution of sRBC according to their density: low-density sRBC population remained closer to the center of the channel, while the densest cells segregated towards the walls. There was no impact of the mean flow velocity and little impact of hematocrit. This segregation heterogeneity could influence the ability of sRBC to adhere to the vascular wall and slow down blood flow. However, promoting aggregation inhibited segregation while CDL thickness was enhanced by aggregation, highlighting a potential protective role against vaso-occlusion in patients with sickle cell anemia. [less ▲]

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See detailRare Anemias: Are Their Names Just Smoke and Mirrors?
Simionato, Greta; van Wijk, Richard; Quint, Stephan et al

in Frontiers in physiology (2021), 12

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See detailVortical flow structures induced by red blood cells in capillaries.
Yaya, François; Römer, Johannes; Guckenberger, Achim et al

in Microcirculation (New York, N.Y. : 1994) (2021), 28(5), 12693

OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the flow field of the plasma around the red blood cells in capillary flow is important for a physical understanding of blood flow and the transport of micro- and nanoparticles ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the flow field of the plasma around the red blood cells in capillary flow is important for a physical understanding of blood flow and the transport of micro- and nanoparticles and molecules in the flowing plasma. We conducted an experimental study on the flow field around red blood cells in capillary flow that is complemented by simulations of vortical flow between red blood cells. METHODS: Red blood cells were injected in a 10 × 12 µm rectangular microchannel at a low hematocrit, and the flow field around one or two cells was captured by a high-speed camera that tracked 250 nm nanoparticles in the flow field, acting as tracers. RESULTS: While the flow field around a steady "croissant" shape is found to be similar to that of a rigid sphere, the flow field around a "slipper" shape exhibits a small vortex at the rear of the red blood cell. Even more pronounced are vortex-like structures observed in the central region between two neighboring croissants. CONCLUSIONS: The rotation frequency of the vortices is to a good approximation, inversely proportional to the distance between the cells. Our experimental data are complemented by numerical simulations. [less ▲]

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See detailLingering Dynamics in Microvascular Blood Flow.
Kihm, Alexander; Quint, Stephan; Laschke, Matthias W. et al

in Biophysical journal (2021), 120(3), 432-439

The microvascular networks in the body of vertebrates consist of the smallest vessels such as arterioles, capillaries, and venules. The flow of red blood cells (RBCs) through these networks ensures the ... [more ▼]

The microvascular networks in the body of vertebrates consist of the smallest vessels such as arterioles, capillaries, and venules. The flow of red blood cells (RBCs) through these networks ensures the gas exchange in as well as the transport of nutrients to the tissues. Any alterations in this blood flow may have severe implications on the health state. Because the vessels in these networks obey dimensions similar to the diameter of RBCs, dynamic effects on the cellular scale play a key role. The steady progression in the numerical modeling of RBCs, even in complex networks, has led to novel findings in the field of hemodynamics, especially concerning the impact and the dynamics of lingering events when a cell meets a branch of the network. However, these results are yet to be matched by a detailed analysis of the lingering experiments in vivo. To quantify this lingering effect in in vivo experiments, this study analyzes branching vessels in the microvasculature of Syrian golden hamsters via intravital microscopy and the use of an implanted dorsal skinfold chamber. It also presents a detailed analysis of these lingering effects of cells at the apex of bifurcating vessels, affecting the temporal distribution of plasmatic zones of blood flow in the branches and even causing a partial blockage in severe cases. [less ▲]

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See detailAcanthocyte Sedimentation Rate as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes: Experimental Evidence and Physical Justification.
Darras, Alexis; Peikert, Kevin; Rabe, Antonia et al

in Cells (2021), 10(4),

(1) Background: Chorea-acanthocytosis and McLeod syndrome are the core diseases among the group of rare neurodegenerative disorders called neuroacanthocytosis syndromes (NASs). NAS patients have a ... [more ▼]

(1) Background: Chorea-acanthocytosis and McLeod syndrome are the core diseases among the group of rare neurodegenerative disorders called neuroacanthocytosis syndromes (NASs). NAS patients have a variable number of irregularly spiky erythrocytes, so-called acanthocytes. Their detection is a crucial but error-prone parameter in the diagnosis of NASs, often leading to misdiagnoses. (2) Methods: We measured the standard Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of various blood samples from NAS patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, we manipulated the ESR by swapping the erythrocytes and plasma of different individuals, as well as replacing plasma with dextran. These measurements were complemented by clinical laboratory data and single-cell adhesion force measurements. Additionally, we followed theoretical modeling approaches. (3) Results: We show that the acanthocyte sedimentation rate (ASR) with a two-hour read-out is significantly prolonged in chorea-acanthocytosis and McLeod syndrome without overlap compared to the ESR of the controls. Mechanistically, through modern colloidal physics, we show that acanthocyte aggregation and plasma fibrinogen levels slow down the sedimentation. Moreover, the inverse of ASR correlates with the number of acanthocytes (R2=0.61, p=0.004). (4) Conclusions: The ASR/ESR is a clear, robust and easily obtainable diagnostic marker. Independently of NASs, we also regard this study as a hallmark of the physical view of erythrocyte sedimentation by describing anticoagulated blood in stasis as a percolating gel, allowing the application of colloidal physics theory. [less ▲]

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See detailA deep learning-based concept for high throughput image flow cytometry
Martin-Wortham, Julie; Recktenwald, Steffen M.; Lopes, Marcelle G. M. et al

in APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS (2021), 118(12),

We propose a flow cytometry concept that combines a spatial optical modulation scheme and deep learning for lensless cell imaging. Inspired by auto-encoder techniques, an artificial neural network mimics ... [more ▼]

We propose a flow cytometry concept that combines a spatial optical modulation scheme and deep learning for lensless cell imaging. Inspired by auto-encoder techniques, an artificial neural network mimics the optical transfer function of a particular microscope and camera for certain types of cells once trained and reconstructs microscope images from simple waveforms that are generated by cells in microfluidic flow. This eventually enables the label-free detection of cells at high throughput while simultaneously providing their corresponding brightfield images. The present work focuses on the computational proof of concept of this method by mimicking the waveforms. Our suggested approach would require a minimum set of optical components such as a collimated light source, a slit mask, and a light sensor and could be easily integrated into a ruggedized lab-on-chip device. The method is benchmarked with a well-investigated dataset of red blood cell images. [less ▲]

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See detailThe TRPV2 channel mediates Ca2+ influx and the Delta 9-THC-dependent decrease in osmotic fragility in red blood cells
Belkacemi, Anouar; Fecher-Trost, Claudia; Tinschert, Rene et al

in HAEMATOLOGICA (2021), 106(8), 2246-2250

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See detailOptimizing pressure-driven pulsatile flows in microfluidic devices.
Recktenwald, Steffen M.; Wagner, Christian UL; John, Thomas

in Lab on a chip (2021), 21(13), 2605-2613

Unsteady and pulsatile flows receive increasing attention due to their potential to enhance various microscale processes. Further, they possess significant relevance for microfluidic studies under ... [more ▼]

Unsteady and pulsatile flows receive increasing attention due to their potential to enhance various microscale processes. Further, they possess significant relevance for microfluidic studies under physiological flow conditions. However, generating a precise time-dependent flow field with commercial, pneumatically operated pressure controllers remains challenging and can lead to significant deviations from the desired waveform. In this study, we present a method to correct such deviations and thus optimize pulsatile flows in microfluidic experiments using two commercial pressure pumps. Therefore, we first analyze the linear response of the systems to a sinusoidal pressure input, which allows us to predict the time-dependent pressure output for arbitrary pulsatile input signals. Second, we explain how to derive an adapted input signal, which significantly reduces deviations between the desired and actual output pressure signals of various waveforms. We demonstrate that this adapted pressure input leads to an enhancement of the time-dependent flow of red blood cells in microchannels. The presented method does not rely on any hardware modifications and can be easily implemented in standard pressure-driven microfluidic setups to generate accurate pulsatile flows with arbitrary waveforms. [less ▲]

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