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See detailThe impact of self-control cues on subsequent monetary risk-taking.
Brevers, Damien UL; Foucart, Jennifer; Turel, Ofir et al

in Journal of behavioral addictions (2018), 7(4), 1044-1055

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The "process-model" of self-control proposes that the ego-depletion effect is better explained by a switch between interest in "have-to" labor and cognitive "want-to" leisure, rather ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The "process-model" of self-control proposes that the ego-depletion effect is better explained by a switch between interest in "have-to" labor and cognitive "want-to" leisure, rather than being mainly due to a decrease in cognitive resources, as advanced by the "strength-model" of self-control. However, it is currently difficult to disentangle the "process-model" from the "strength-model" of self-control. Here, we employed a stepwise approach, featuring three studies, for testing the process model of self-control. METHODS: In Study 1, we created a list of 30 self-control events for characterizing "have-to" conducts in the daily life. In Study 2, mental visualization of effortful self-control events ("have-to") and monetary risk-taking ("want-to") were employed for testing the strength-model of self-control. In Study 3, to test the process-model of self-control, participants were simply required to read self-control (or neutral) sentences. RESULTS: Study 1 provided evidence regarding external validly for the list of self-control events. Study 2 showed that mental visualization of effortful self-control events increases subsequent monetary risk-taking. Study 3 highlighted that the brief apparition of a self-control-related sentence was sufficient for increasing risk-taking. These patterns were evidenced in the trial with the less advantageous gain/loss ratio. DISCUSSION: Altogether these findings support the process-model of self-control in showing that triggering the semantic content of a "have-to" conduct, without its actual execution, is sufficient for modulating subsequent "want-to" activity. CONCLUSION: These findings could contribute to advancing current knowledge on how the high availability of ready-to-consume rewards in modern environments is redefining humans' self-control ability. [less ▲]

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See detailMindfulness training as part of a treatment for psychological trauma caused by mobbing - A pilot study.
Veeser, Joannes; Vandriette, Y.M.; Kornreich, Charles et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2015)

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See detailEtude des déterminants du syndrome amotivationnel chez les consommateurs de cannabis
Binji, Natasha; Antoniali, Valérie; Noël, Xavier et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2013)

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See detailImpaired inhibition of proactive interference in abstinent individuals with alcoholism.
Noel, Xavier; Billieux, Joël UL; Van der Linden, Martial et al

in Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology (2009), 31(1), 57-64

Cognitive impairment has been associated with higher risk of alcoholism and relapse. Recent theoretical refinements have separated inhibition of dominant response and inhibition of proactive interference ... [more ▼]

Cognitive impairment has been associated with higher risk of alcoholism and relapse. Recent theoretical refinements have separated inhibition of dominant response and inhibition of proactive interference. We assessed the latter using a directed-forgetting procedure in 38 recently detoxified individuals with alcoholism and in 26 controls. On this task, memory performance of letter trigrams was compared when presented alone, followed by a second trigram to be recalled, then a second trigram to be forgotten (directed-forgetting condition). Individuals with alcoholism recalled more letters to be forgotten and performed worse than controls in the directed-forgetting condition, which significantly correlated with the duration of alcoholism. [less ▲]

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