References of "Veizaga Campero, Alvaro Mario 50030965"
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See detailOn Systematically Building a Controlled Natural Language for Functional Requirements
Veizaga Campero, Alvaro Mario UL; Alferez, Mauricio UL; Torre, Damiano UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (2021), 26(4), 79

[Context] Natural language (NL) is pervasive in software requirements specifications (SRSs). However, despite its popularity and widespread use, NL is highly prone to quality issues such as vagueness ... [more ▼]

[Context] Natural language (NL) is pervasive in software requirements specifications (SRSs). However, despite its popularity and widespread use, NL is highly prone to quality issues such as vagueness, ambiguity, and incompleteness. Controlled natural languages (CNLs) have been proposed as a way to prevent quality problems in requirements documents, while maintaining the flexibility to write and communicate requirements in an intuitive and universally understood manner. [Objective] In collaboration with an industrial partner from the financial domain, we systematically develop and evaluate a CNL, named Rimay, intended at helping analysts write functional requirements. [Method] We rely on Grounded Theory for building Rimay and follow well-known guidelines for conducting and reporting industrial case study research. [Results] Our main contributions are: (1) a qualitative methodology to systematically define a CNL for functional requirements; this methodology is intended to be general for use across information-system domains, (2) a CNL grammar to represent functional requirements; this grammar is derived from our experience in the financial domain, but should be applicable, possibly with adaptations, to other information-system domains, and (3) an empirical evaluation of our CNL (Rimay) through an industrial case study. Our contributions draw on 15 representative SRSs, collectively containing 3215 NL requirements statements from the financial domain. [Conclusion] Our evaluation shows that Rimay is expressive enough to capture, on average, 88% (405 out of 460) of the NL requirements statements in four previously unseen SRSs from the financial domain. [less ▲]

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See detailLeveraging Natural-language Requirements for Deriving Better Acceptance Criteria from Models
Veizaga Campero, Alvaro Mario UL; Alferez, Mauricio UL; Torre, Damiano UL et al

in Proceedings of 23rd ACM / IEEE International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems (MODELS) (2020, October)

In many software and systems development projects, analysts specify requirements using a combination of modeling and natural language (NL). In such situations, systematic acceptance testing poses a ... [more ▼]

In many software and systems development projects, analysts specify requirements using a combination of modeling and natural language (NL). In such situations, systematic acceptance testing poses a challenge because defining the acceptance criteria (AC) to be met by the system under test has to account not only for the information in the (requirements) model but also that in the NL requirements. In other words, neither models nor NL requirements per se provide a complete picture of the information content relevant to AC. Our work in this paper is prompted by the observation that a reconciliation of the information content in NL requirements and models is necessary for obtaining precise AC. We perform such reconciliation by devising an approach that automatically extracts AC-related information from NL requirements and helps modelers enrich their model with the extracted information. An existing AC derivation technique is then applied to the model that has now been enriched by the information extracted from NL requirements. Using a real case study from the financial domain, we evaluate the usefulness of the AC-related model enrichments recommended by our approach. Our evaluation results are very promising: Over our case study system, a group of five domain experts found 89% of the recommended enrichments relevant to AC and yet absent from the original model (precision of 89%). Furthermore, the experts could not pinpoint any additional information in the NL requirements which was relevant to AC but which had not already been brought to their attention by our approach (recall of 100%) [less ▲]

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