References of "Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri 50022625"
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See detailMotor action changes pain perception : a sensory attenuation paradigm in the context of pain
Pinto, Eleana; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Meulders, Ann et al

in PAIN (2021)

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See detailThe time course of attentional biases in pain : a meta-analysis of eye tracking studies
Jones, Emma Blaisdale; Sharpe, Louise; Andrews, Sally et al

in PAIN (2021)

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See detailAcceptance is not acceptance, but acceptance!
van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL

Report (2021)

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See detailAltered regulation of negative affect in patients with fibromyalgia : a diary study
Rost, Silke; Crombez, Geert; Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2021)

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability ... [more ▼]

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability to regulate emotional problems. In this study, we examined two indices of emotion regulation, that is, (a) affective instability, involving frequent large fluctuations in self-reported affect, and (b) resting heart rate variability (HRV). 45.4 years; 39 females) and 46 matched healthy controls (M-age = 44.9 years; 37 females). Heart rate was monitored under resting conditions to derive HRV. Subsequently, participants completed an electronic end-of-day diary for 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain, disability, negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA). Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood. Results Results indicate increased levels of NA instability and reduced levels of HRV in patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, HRV and NA instability were inversely related. Finally, in patients, higher NA instability was related to increased pain disability. Conclusions Current findings support the idea that patients with fibromyalgia are confronted with fluctuating emotions. These results may have important implications for treatment as they provide support for the use of emotion regulation skills training in patients with fibromyalgia to impact upon NA instability. Significance This study provides novel insight in the link between emotion regulation indices,that is, heart-rate variability and negative affective (NA) instability, in patients with fibromyalgia, and presents evidence for differences in both emotion regulation indices between patients with fibromyalgia and healthy people. Furthermore, results link increased NA instability with increased levels of daily disability in patients with fibromyalgia. Together, these findings offer support for a key role of emotion regulation in fibromyalgia outcomes, providing pathways for clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailWellbeing and perceived stigma in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia : a daily diary study
Van Alboom, Maité; De Ruddere, Lies; Kindt, Sara et al

in CLINICAL JOURNAL OF PAIN (2021)

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See detailCognitive processing of itch and pain : the role of attention and expectations.
van Laarhoven, Antoinette; Peerdeman, Kaya; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in Itch and pain : similarities, interactions, and differences (2020)

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See detailThe effects of gamification on computerized cognitive training : systematic review and meta-analysis
Vermeir, Julie F.; White, Melanie J.; Johnson, Daniel et al

in JMIR SERIOUS GAMES (2020), 8(3), 18644234--18644256

Background: There has been a growing interest in the application of gamification (ie, the use of game elements) to computerized cognitive training. The introduction of targeted gamification features to ... [more ▼]

Background: There has been a growing interest in the application of gamification (ie, the use of game elements) to computerized cognitive training. The introduction of targeted gamification features to such tasks may increase motivation and engagement as well as improve intervention effects. However, it is possible that game elements can also have adverse effects on cognitive training (eg, be a distraction), which can outweigh their potential motivational benefits. So far, little is known about the effectiveness of such applications. Objective: This study aims to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effect of gamification on process outcomes (eg, motivation) and on changes in the training domain (eg, cognition), as well as to explore the role of potential moderators. Methods: We searched PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, ProQuest Psychology, Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, Science Direct, Excerpta Medica dataBASE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore, Association for Computing Machinery, and a range of gray-area literature databases. The searches included papers published between 2008 and 2018. Meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model. 0.72) and more demanding/difficult (Hedges g=-0.52) than non- or less-gamified tasks, whereas no effects on the training domain were found. Furthermore, no variables moderated the impact of gamified training tasks. However, meta-analytic findings were limited due to a small number of studies. Conclusions: Overall, this review provides an overview of the existing research in the domain and provides evidence for the effectiveness of gamification in improving motivation/engagement in the context of cognitive training. We discuss the shortcomings in the current literature and provide recommendations for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailLet’s talk about pain catastrophizing measures: an item content analysis
Crombez, Geert; Depaepe, Annick; Veirman, Elke et al

in PeerJ (2020)

Background. Concerns have been raised about whether self-report measures of pain catastrophizing reflect the construct as defined in the cognitive-behavioral literature. We investigated the content of ... [more ▼]

Background. Concerns have been raised about whether self-report measures of pain catastrophizing reflect the construct as defined in the cognitive-behavioral literature. We investigated the content of these self-report measures; that is, whether items assess the construct ‘pain catastrophizing’ and not other theoretical constructs (i.e., related constructs or pain outcomes) using the discriminant content validity method. Method. Items (n = 58) of six pain catastrophizing measures were complemented with items (n = 34) from questionnaires measuring pain-related worrying, vigilance, pain severity, distress, and disability. Via an online survey, 94 participants rated to what extent each item was relevant for assessing pain catastrophizing, defined as ‘‘to view or present pain or pain-related problems as considerably worse than they actually are’’ and other relevant constructs (pain-related worrying, vigilance, pain severity, distress, and disability). Results. Data were analyzed using Bayesian hierarchical models. The results revealed that the items from pain-related worrying, vigilance, pain severity, distress, and disability questionnaires were distinctively related to their respective constructs. This was not observed for the items from the pain catastrophizing questionnaires. The content of the pain catastrophizing measures was equally well, or even better, captured by pain-related worrying or pain-related distress. Conclusion. Based upon current findings, a recommendation may be to develop a novel pain catastrophizing questionnaire. However, we argue that pain catastrophizing cannot be assessed by self-report questionnaires. Pain catastrophizing requires contextual information, and expert judgment, which cannot be provided by self-report questionnaires. We argue for a person-centered approach, and propose to rename ‘pain catastrophizing’ measures in line with what is better measured: ‘pain-related worrying’ [less ▲]

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See detailAttentional biases in pediatric chronic pain : an eye-tracking study assessing the nature of the bias and its relation to attentional control
Soltani, Sabine; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Vervoort, Tine et al

in PAIN (2020), 161(10), 2263--2273

Attentional biases are posited to play a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain in adults and youth. However, research to date has yielded mixed findings, and few studies have ... [more ▼]

Attentional biases are posited to play a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain in adults and youth. However, research to date has yielded mixed findings, and few studies have examined attentional biases in pediatric samples. This study used eye-gaze tracking to examine attentional biases to pain-related stimuli in a clinical sample of youth with chronic pain and pain-free controls. The moderating role of attentional control was also examined. Youth with chronic pain (n = 102) and pain-free controls (n = 53) viewed images of children depicting varying levels of pain expressiveness paired with neutral faces while their eye gaze was recorded. Attentional control was assessed using both a questionnaire and a behavioural task. Both groups were more likely to first fixate on high pain faces but showed no such orienting bias for moderate or low pain faces. Youth with chronic pain fixated longer on all pain faces than neutral faces, whereas youth in the control group exhibited a total fixation bias only for high and moderate pain faces. Attentional control did not moderate attentional biases between or within groups. The results lend support to theoretical models positing the presence of attentional biases in youth with chronic pain. Further research is required to clarify the nature of attentional biases and their relationship to clinical outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroticism may not reflect emotional variability
Kalokerinos, Elise K.; Murphy, Sean C.; Koval, Peter et al

in PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (2020), 117(17), 9270--9276

Neuroticism is one of the major traits describing human personality, and a predictor of mental and physical disorders with profound public health significance. Individual differences in emotional ... [more ▼]

Neuroticism is one of the major traits describing human personality, and a predictor of mental and physical disorders with profound public health significance. Individual differences in emotional variability are thought to reflect the core of neuroticism. However, the empirical relation between emotional variability and neuroticism may be partially the result of a measurement artifact reflecting neuroticism’s relation with higher mean levels—rather than greater variability—of negative emotion. When emotional intensity is measured using bounded scales, there is a dependency between variability and mean levels: at low (or high) intensity, it is impossible to demonstrate high variability. As neuroticism is positively associated with mean levels of negative emotion, this may account for the relation between neuroticism and emotional variability. In a metaanalysis of 11 studies (<jats:italic>N</jats:italic> = 1,205 participants; 83,411 observations), we tested whether the association between neuroticism and negative emotional variability was clouded by a dependency between variability and the mean. We found a medium-sized positive association between neuroticism and negative emotional variability, but, when using a relative variability index to correct for mean negative emotion, this association disappeared. This indicated that neuroticism was associated with experiencing more intense, but not more variable, negative emotions. Our findings call into question theory, measurement scales, and data suggesting that emotional variability is central to neuroticism. In doing so, they provide a revisionary perspective for understanding how this individual difference may predispose to mental and physical disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailParental (non-)pain attending verbalizations moderate the relationship between child attention and memory bias for pain
Wauters, Aline; Noel, Melanie; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2020), 24(9), 1797--1811

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain ... [more ▼]

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain development. While mechanisms underlying children's pain memory development remain poorly understood, attention biases and parent language have been implicated in conceptual models. This study examined the association between child pain‐related attention and memory biases and the moderating role of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Methods: Participants were 51 school children and one of their parents. Probability of initial fixation and gaze duration to pain were assessed using eye tracking methodology. Children performed a cold pressor task (CPT) and reported on experienced pain intensity and pain‐related fear. A 3‐minute parent–child interaction upon CPT completion allowed measurement of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Children's pain‐related memories were elicited 2 weeks later. Results: Findings indicated that the relationship between maintained attention to pain and fear memory bias was moderated by parental non‐pain attending verbalizations such that higher gaze duration bias was positively associated with fear memory bias but only among children whose parents demonstrated low levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. The opposite pattern was observed for children whose parents showed high levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. No such effects were observed for child initial attention bias to pain, memory bias for pain and parental pain attending verbalizations. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of parental and child pain‐related variables as well as their interaction in understanding negatively biased pain‐related memories. Significance: This study on child pain memories is the first to highlight that characteristics of the social context, such as parental (non‐)pain‐related verbalizations, as well as factors related to the intra‐individual experience of pain, such as child attention bias to pain, should be studied jointly, as they interact with each other in their effect on the emergence of negatively biased memories of painful events. [less ▲]

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See detailAdherence to the physical distancing measures during the COVID‐19 pandemic : a HAPA‐based perspective
Beeckman, Melanie; De Paepe, Annick; Van Alboom, Maité et al

in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (2020), 12(4), 1224--1243

Background: The COVID‐19 pandemic requires massive and rapid behavior change. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) describes personal determinants that play a key role in behavior change. This study ... [more ▼]

Background: The COVID‐19 pandemic requires massive and rapid behavior change. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) describes personal determinants that play a key role in behavior change. This study investigated whether these determinants are associated with adherence to physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID‐19 (i.e. keeping 1.5 m physical distance and staying at home). Decreased psychosocial well‐being and lack of social support were explored as barriers to adherence. 2,379; March 2020) focused on adherence to physical distancing measures. The second survey (N = 805; April 2020) focused on difficulty with, and perseverance in, adhering to these measures. Linear regression models were fitted to examine associations with HAPA determinants, psychosocial well‐being, and social support. Results: Self‐efficacy, outcome expectancies, intention, action planning, and coping planning were related to adhering to, difficulty with, and perseverance in, adhering to physical distancing measures. Decreased psychosocial well‐being and lack of social support were related to more difficulties with adhering to physical distancing and lower perseverance. Conclusions: Health action process approach determinants are associated with adherence to physical distancing measures. Future work could design HAPA‐based interventions to support people in adhering to these measures. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidimensional screening for predicting pain problems in adults: a systematic review of screening tools and validation studies
Veirman, Elke; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Depaepe et al

in PAIN Reports (2019)

Abstract Screening tools allowing to predict poor pain outcomes are widely used. Often these screening tools contain psychosocial risk factors. This review (1) identifies multidimensional screening tools ... [more ▼]

Abstract Screening tools allowing to predict poor pain outcomes are widely used. Often these screening tools contain psychosocial risk factors. This review (1) identifies multidimensional screening tools that include psychosocial risk factors for the development or maintenance of pain, pain-related distress, and pain-related disability across pain problems in adults, (2) evaluates the quality of the validation studies using Prediction model Risk Of Bias ASsessment Tool (PROBAST), and (3) synthesizes methodological concerns. We identified 32 articles, across 42 study samples, validating 7 screening tools. All tools were developed in the context of musculoskeletal pain, most often back pain, and aimed to predict the maintenance of pain or pain-related disability, not pain-related distress. Although more recent studies design, conduct, analyze, and report according to best practices in prognosis research, risk of bias was most often moderate. Common methodological concerns were identified, related to participant selection (eg, mixed populations), predictors (eg, predictors were administered differently to predictors in the development study), outcomes (eg, overlap between predictors and outcomes), sample size and participant flow (eg, unknown or inappropriate handlin [less ▲]

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See detailPain Unstuck: The Role of Action and Motivation
Tabor, Abby; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Hasenbring, Monika

in Clinical Journal of Pain (2019)

Background: What is it that motivates our actions? As human beings, existing as part of complex societies, the actions we take are subject to multiple, often competing motives. Spanning nonconscious ... [more ▼]

Background: What is it that motivates our actions? As human beings, existing as part of complex societies, the actions we take are subject to multiple, often competing motives. Spanning nonconscious reflexes, cognitively derived choice as well as long- and short-term goals, our actions allow us to make sense of our environment. Pain disrupts action and hijacks our intentions. Whilst considered adaptive when temporary, pain that persists continues to interrupt and can threaten our ability to actively investigate a changing world. Objective: This work is a narrative review. Results: Drawing upon three complementary theoretical approaches to pain: an embodied framework, a motivational approach and the avoidance-endurance model, this review places the relationship between pain, motivation and action at its core, unpicking a dynamic process that can become stuck. Conclusions: In taking a wide view of pain and action, we expose the nuances within drive to goal behaviour in the presence of pain. This has implications for the clinic, specifically in relation to assessing the multifactorial influences that shape action in pain. But it also seeks to go further, considering the broader environment in which we make decisions and the influence that other professionals, outside of typical healthcare roles, may play a part in the maintenance and resolution of pain. Key Words: pain unstuck, embodied pain, motivation, cognitive bias, avoidance vs. endurance [less ▲]

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See detailResilience factors in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their parents : the role of child and parent psychological flexibility
Beeckman, Melanie; Hughes, Sean Joseph; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in PAIN MEDICINE (2019), 20(6), 1120--1131

Objective. Chronic pain is central to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and is predictive of impaired functioning. Whereas most work has focused on identifying psychosocial risk factors for maladaptive ... [more ▼]

Objective. Chronic pain is central to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and is predictive of impaired functioning. Whereas most work has focused on identifying psychosocial risk factors for maladaptive outcomes, we explored the idea that child and parental psychological flexibility (PF) represent resilience factors for adaptive functioning of the child. We also explored differences between general vs pain-specific PF in contributing to child outcomes. Methods. Children with JIA (age eight to 18 years) and (one of) their parents were recruited at the Department of Pediatric Rheumatology at the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. They completed questionnaires assessing child and parent general and pain-specific PF and child psychosocial and emotional functioning and disability. Results. The final sample consisted of 59 children and 48 parents. Multiple regression analyses revealed that child PF contributed to better psychosocial functioning and less negative affect. Child pain acceptance contributed to better psychosocial functioning, lower levels of disability, and lower negative affect, and also buffered the negative influence of pain intensity on disability. Bootstrap mediation analyses demonstrated that parental (general) PF indirectly contributed to child psychosocial functioning and affect via the child's (general) PF. Parent pain-specific PF was indirectly linked to child psychosocial functioning, disability, and negative affect via child pain acceptance. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that child and parental PF are resilience factors and that pain acceptance buffers the negative impact of pain intensity. Implications for psychosocial interventions that target (pain-specific) PF in children and parents are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMindfulness, worries, and parenting in parents of children with type 1 diabetes
Van Gampelaere, Cynthia; Luyckx, Koen; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC PSYCHOLOGY (2019), 44(4), 499--508

Objective Parents of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often experience distress and worries, which may negatively impact their parenting behaviors. The current study investigates parental mindfulness ... [more ▼]

Objective Parents of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often experience distress and worries, which may negatively impact their parenting behaviors. The current study investigates parental mindfulness (i.e., an enhanced attention to and awareness of current experiences or present reality) as a resilience mechanism. Using a daily diary approach, the predictive role of parental mindfulness for daily diabetes-related worries was examined, its impact upon protective parenting behaviors, and its buffering role in the relationship between daily worries and protective parenting behaviors. Methods Participants were 56 parents of 40 children with T1D (2–12 years). Trait mindfulness was assessed with the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. Subsequently, parents completed a diary for 14 consecutive days, assessing parental worries about hypo- and hyperglycemia and general and diabetes-specific parental protective behavior. Results Multilevel analyses showed that parental diabetes-related worries fluctuated substantially across days and positively predicted daily protective behavior. Higher levels of parental mindfulness predicted less daily worries about hypoglycemia and lower engagement in general protective behavior and hypoglycemia avoidance behavior. In addition, the relationship between worries about hyperglycemia and general protective behavior was moderated by parental mindfulness. Conclusions The present findings highlight the importance of daily parental worries in explaining parental protective behaviors on a daily basis. Mindfulness emerged as a promising resilience factor in parents of children with T1D, resulting in less daily worries and protective parenting. These results have important clinical implications and point to the promising role of mindfulness interventions in this context. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive biases in pain: An integrated functional-contextual framework
Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Noel, Melanie; Sharpe, Louise et al

in Pain (2019)

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