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See detailmiR-661 expression in SNAI1-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition contributes to breast cancer cell invasion by targeting Nectin-1 and StarD10 messengers
Vetter, G.; Saumet, A.; Moes, Michèle UL et al

in Oncogene (2016), 35(5), 670

Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step toward metastasis. MCF7 breast cancer cells conditionally expressing the EMT master regulator SNAI1 were used to identify early expressed microRNAs ... [more ▼]

Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step toward metastasis. MCF7 breast cancer cells conditionally expressing the EMT master regulator SNAI1 were used to identify early expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) and their targets that may contribute to the EMT process. Potential targets of miRNAs were identified by matching lists of in silico predicted targets and of inversely expressed mRNAs. MiRNAs were ranked based on the number of predicted hits, highlighting miR-661, a miRNA with so far no reported role in EMT. MiR-661 was found required for efficient invasion of breast cancer cells by destabilizing two of its predicted mRNA targets, the cell-cell adhesion protein Nectin-1 and the lipid transferase StarD10, resulting, in turn, in the downregulation of epithelial markers. Reexpression of Nectin-1 or StarD10 lacking the 3'-untranslated region counteracted SNAI1-induced invasion. Importantly, analysis of public transcriptomic data from a cohort of 295 well-characterized breast tumor specimen revealed that expression of StarD10 is highly associated with markers of luminal subtypes whereas its loss negatively correlated with the EMT-related, basal-like subtype. Collectively, our non-a priori approach revealed a nonpredicted link between SNAI1-triggered EMT and the down-regulation of Nectin-1 and StarD10 through the up-regulation of miR-661, which may contribute to the invasion of breast cancer cells and poor disease outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of SOCS2 and SOCS6 as biomarkers in human colorectal cancer.
Letellier, Elisabeth UL; Schmitz, Martine UL; Baig, Komal UL et al

in British journal of cancer (2014), 111(4), 726-35

BACKGROUND: Over the past years, some members of the family of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins have emerged as potential tumour suppressors. This study aimed at investigating the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Over the past years, some members of the family of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins have emerged as potential tumour suppressors. This study aimed at investigating the clinical significance of SOCS proteins in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). METHODS: We integrated publicly available microarray expression data on CRC in humans, analysed the expression pattern of SOCSs and assessed the predictive power of SOCS2 and SOCS6 for diagnostic purposes by generating receiver operating characteristic curves. Using laser microdissected patient material we assessed SOCS expression on RNA and protein levels as well as their methylation status in an independent CRC patient cohort. Finally, we investigated the prognostic value of SOCS2 and SOCS6. RESULTS: The meta-analysis as well as the independent patient cohort analysis reveal a stage-independent downregulation of SOCS2 and SOCS6 and identify both molecules as diagnostic biomarkers for CRC. We demonstrate a different methylation pattern within the SOCS2 promoter between tumour tissue and normal control tissue in 25% of CRC patients. Furthermore, early CRC stage patients with low expression of SOCS2 display significantly shorter disease-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: Our data offers evidence that SOCS2 and SOCS6 levels are reduced in CRC and may serve as diagnostic biomarkers for CRC patients. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-resolved analysis of transcriptional events during SNAI1-triggered epithelial to mesenchymal transition
Vetter, G.; Le Béchec, Antony UL; Muller, J. et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2009), 385(4), 485-91

The transcription regulator SNAI1 triggers a transcriptional program leading to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing epithelial cells with mesenchymal features and invasive properties ... [more ▼]

The transcription regulator SNAI1 triggers a transcriptional program leading to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing epithelial cells with mesenchymal features and invasive properties during embryonic development and tumor progression. To identify early transcriptional changes occurring during SNAI1-induced EMT, we performed a time-resolved genome-scale study using human breast carcinoma cells conditionally expressing SNAI1. The approach we developed for microarray data analysis, allowed identifying three distinct EMT stages and the temporal classification of genes. Importantly, we identified unexpected, biphasic expression profiles of EMT-associated genes, supporting their pivotal role during this process. Finally, we established early EMT gene networks by identifying transcription factors and their potential targets which may orchestrate early events of EMT. Collectively, our work provides a framework for the identification and future systematic analysis of novel genes which contribute to SNAI1-triggered EMT. [less ▲]

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See detailAdvanced spot quality analysis in two-colour microarray experiments
Yatskou, M.; Novikov, E.; Vetter, G. et al

in BMC Research Notes (2008), 1

Background: Image analysis of microarrays and, in particular, spot quantification and spot quality control, is one of the most important steps in statistical analysis of microarray data. Recent methods of ... [more ▼]

Background: Image analysis of microarrays and, in particular, spot quantification and spot quality control, is one of the most important steps in statistical analysis of microarray data. Recent methods of spot quality control are still in early age of development, often leading to underestimation of true positive microarray features and, consequently, to loss of important biological information. Therefore, improving and standardizing the statistical approaches of spot quality control are essential to facilitate the overall analysis of microarray data and subsequent extraction of biological information. Findings: We evaluated the performance of two image analysis packages MAIA and GenePix (GP) using two complementary experimental approaches with a focus on the statistical analysis of spot quality factors. First, we developed control microarrays with a priori known fluorescence ratios to verify the accuracy and precision of the ratio estimation of signal intensities. Next, we developed advanced semi-automatic protocols of spot quality evaluation in MAIA and GP and compared their performance with available facilities of spot quantitative filtering in GP. We evaluated these algorithms for standardised spot quality analysis in a whole-genome microarray experiment assessing well-characterised transcriptional modifications induced by the transcription regulator SNAI1. Using a set of RT-PCR or qRT-PCR validated microarray data, we found that the semi-automatic protocol of spot quality control we developed with MAIA allowed recovering approximately 13% more spots and 38% more differentially expressed genes (at FDR = 5%) than GP with default spot filtering conditions. Conclusion: Careful control of spot quality characteristics with advanced spot quality evaluation can significantly increase the amount of confident and accurate data resulting in more meaningful biological conclusions. © 2008 Friederich et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton
Muller, J.; Mehlen, A.; Vetter, G. et al

in BMC Genomics (2007), 8

Background: The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system ... [more ▼]

Background: The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results: Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI) allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that Actichip is a powerful alternative to commercial high density microarrays for cytoskeleton gene profiling in normal or pathological samples. Actichip is available upon request. © 2007 Muller et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. [less ▲]

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