References of "Thorens, G."
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence and characteristics of addictive behaviors in a community sample: A latent class analysis
Deleuze, J.; Rochat, L.; Romo, L. et al

in Addictive Behaviors Reports (2015), 1

While addictions to substances such as alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs have been extensively investigated, interest has been growing in potential non-substance-related addictive behaviors (e.g ... [more ▼]

While addictions to substances such as alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs have been extensively investigated, interest has been growing in potential non-substance-related addictive behaviors (e.g., excessive gambling, buying or playing video games). In the current study, we sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of a wide range of addictive behaviors in a general population sample and to identify reliable subgroups of individuals displaying addictive behaviors.Seven hundred seventy participants completed an online survey. The survey screened for the presence and characteristics of the main recognized substance and behavioral addictions (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, other drugs, gambling, compulsive shopping, intensive exercise, Internet and mobile phone overuse, intensive work involvement, and overeating) in a three-month period. Key aspects of addiction were measured for each reported behavior, including negative outcomes, emotional triggers (positive and negative emotional contexts), search for stimulation or pleasure, loss of control, and cognitive salience.Latent class analysis allowed us to identify three theoretically and clinically relevant subgroups of individuals. The first class groups problematic users, i.e., addiction-prone individuals. The second class groups at-risk users who frequently engage in potentially addictive behaviors to regulate emotional states (especially overinvolvement in common behaviors such as eating, working, or buying). The third class groups individuals who are not prone to addictive behaviors.The existence of different groups in the population sheds new light on the distinction between problematic and non-problematic addiction-like behaviors. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProblematic involvement in online games: A cluster analytic approach
Billieux, Joël UL; Thorens, G.; Khazaal, Y. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2015), 43

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior ... [more ▼]

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior, including impulsivity traits, motives to play (immersion, achievement, social affiliation), and self-esteem. The aim of the current study is to determine whether reliable subtypes of problematic online gamers can be identified. A sample of 1057 online gamers was recruited. Validated questionnaires were used to measure established psychological risk factors (impulsivity, motives to play, self-esteem) and potential consequences of playing (addiction symptoms, positive and negative affect). Actual in-game behaviors were also monitored. Five reliable clusters of gamers were identified (three problematic and two nonproblematic clusters). Cluster comparison revealed that the psychological factors considered are differentially involved in problematic online gaming. At the theoretical level, the results emphasized that problem online gaming depends on a wide range of psychological factors. At the clinical level, the diversity of psychological profiles shown supports the development of personalized (custom-made) interventions targeting specific psychological mechanisms. Overall, our findings suggest that conceptualizing the problematic use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games as "behavioral addiction" is too restrictive and might result in the simplification of heterogeneous and multi-determined problematic behaviors. © 2014, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy do you play World of Warcraft? An in-depth exploration of self-reported motivations to play online and in-game behaviours in the virtual world of Azeroth
Billieux, Joël UL; Van Der Linden, M.; Achab, S. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2013), 29(1), 103-109

Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are video games in which players create an avatar that evolves and interacts with other avatars in a persistent virtual world. Motivations to play ... [more ▼]

Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are video games in which players create an avatar that evolves and interacts with other avatars in a persistent virtual world. Motivations to play MMORPGs are heterogeneous (e.g. achievement, socialisation, immersion in virtual worlds). This study investigates in detail the relationships between self-reported motives and actual in-game behaviours. We recruited a sample of 690 World of Warcraft players (the most popular MMORPG) who agreed to have their avatar monitored for 8 months. Participants completed an initial online survey about their motives to play. Their actual in-game behaviours were measured through the game's official database (the Armory website). Results showed specific associations between motives and in-game behaviours. Moreover, longitudinal analyses revealed that teamwork- and competition-oriented motives are the most accurate predictors of fast progression in the game. In addition, although specific associations exist between problematic use and certain motives (e.g. advancement, escapism), longitudinal analyses showed that high involvement in the game is not necessarily associated with a negative impact upon daily living. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe potential interest of topiramate in addictions
Thorens, G.; Billieux, Joël UL; Manghi, R. et al

in Current Pharmaceutical Design (2011), 17(14), 1410-1415

Topiramate is one of the currently most promising compounds in the field of addiction medicine. This paper discusses its potential utility related to a phase model of addiction development, focusing on ... [more ▼]

Topiramate is one of the currently most promising compounds in the field of addiction medicine. This paper discusses its potential utility related to a phase model of addiction development, focusing on the assumption that addiction is a continuous process involving different neurobiological pathways, depending on the stage of addiction. A specific emphasis will be made on the development of dysfunctional automatic behaviors in the late stage of addiction and the central role of glutamate and AMPA receptors. The aim is to propose that if too broad an effect of anti-addiction medication is expected (such as anti-craving, anti-relapse and preventive effects), the results might be disappointing. The speculative specific efficacy of topiramate in addiction is described. ©2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (1 UL)