References of "Thimmel, Markus"
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See detailSmarter charging: Power allocation accounting for travel time of electric vehicle drivers
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Thimmel, Markus; Weibelzahl, Martin et al

in Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment (2021), 97

Growing electric vehicle (EV) dissemination will increase charging infrastructure installation at home. Similar daily routines are associated with high peak loads due to simultaneous EV charging. However ... [more ▼]

Growing electric vehicle (EV) dissemination will increase charging infrastructure installation at home. Similar daily routines are associated with high peak loads due to simultaneous EV charging. However, predominantly residential power transmission is not designed for such high loads, yielding charging bottlenecks and restricting future charging at home. Addressing such bottleneck situations and including the EV driver perspective, we introduce a power allocation mechanism that considers the total travel time of the upcoming trip, consisting of actual driving time and time required for charging externally (including the detour to public charging facilities). Assuming that travel time generally negatively correlates with EV driver utility, our optimization model maximizes the resulting utility of EV drivers. Avoiding unnecessary external charging stops due to an insufficient state of charge at the time of departure, our approach generates travel time savings that increase overall EV driver utility. We illustrate our approach using exemplary cases. [less ▲]

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See detailCompensating Balancing Demand by Spatial Load Migration : The Case of Geographically Distributed Data Center
Thimmel, Markus; Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Keller, Robert et al

in Energy Policy (2019), 130

The increasing share of renewables confronts existing power grids with a massive challenge, stemming from additional volatility to power grids introduced by renewable energy sources. This increases the ... [more ▼]

The increasing share of renewables confronts existing power grids with a massive challenge, stemming from additional volatility to power grids introduced by renewable energy sources. This increases the demand for balancing mechanisms, which provide balancing power to ensure that power supply always meets with demand. However, the ability to provide cost-efficient and eco-friendly balancing power can vary significantly between locations. Fridgen et al. (2017) introduce an approach based on geographically distributed data centers, aiming at the spatial migration of balancing power demand between distant locations. Although their approach enables the migration of balancing demand to cost-efficient and/or eco-friendly balancing mechanisms, it will come up against limits if deployed on a global scale. In this paper, we extend Fridgen et al. (2017)’s approach by developing a model based on geographically distributed data centers, which not only enables the migration of balancing demand but also compensates for this migration when it is contradictory between different balancing power markets without burdening conventional balancing mechanisms. Using a simulation based on real-world data, we demonstrate the possibility to exploit the potential of compensation balancing demand offered by spatial load migration resulting in economic gains that will incentivize data center operators to apply our model. [less ▲]

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See detailIndustrielle Energieflexibilität im Energiesystem
Buhl, Hans Ulrich; Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Dufter, Christa et al

in Energieflexibilität in der deutschen Industrie : Ergebnisse aus dem Kopernikus-Projekt - Synchronisierte und energieadaptive Produktionstechnik zur flexiblen Ausrichtung von Industrieprozessen auf eine fluktuierende Energieversorgung (SynErgie) (2019)

Energy from renewable resources is not always readily available. Depending on the season and the weather, the power made available by solar parks or wind turbines varies, for example. Due to the ... [more ▼]

Energy from renewable resources is not always readily available. Depending on the season and the weather, the power made available by solar parks or wind turbines varies, for example. Due to the continuous expansion of renewable energies, the volatility in the energy system will become more and more pronounced in the future. Preparing and adapting the industry to the changing supply structures is a major challenge for the next few decades. In the future, companies must be able to design their processes and operational organization in such a way that energy consumption can at least partially adapt flexibly to the volatile energy supply. In addition to developing technologies, Concepts and measures to make industrial processes more energetic, a second focus of future work is the development of a consistent IT infrastructure with which companies and energy providers can provide and exchange information from the production machine to the energy markets in the future. This leads to a paradigm shift in the operation of industrial processes - away from continuous and purely demand-driven energy consumption towards the adaptable, energy-flexible operation of industrial plants. This reference work presents the most important results of the research in the context of the Kopernikus project Synergy and clarifies trend-setting findings for further developments in the still young field of industrial energy flexibility. [less ▲]

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See detailOne Rate Does Not Fit All: An Empirical Analysis of Electricity Tariffs for Residential Microgrids
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Kahlen, Micha; Ketter, Wolfgang et al

in Applied Energy (2018), 210

Residential microgrids are poised to play an important role in future distributed energy networks. However, energy retailers have yet to identify effective electricity tariffs to incorporate residential ... [more ▼]

Residential microgrids are poised to play an important role in future distributed energy networks. However, energy retailers have yet to identify effective electricity tariffs to incorporate residential microgrids into the energy value chain. For this reason, we have chosen to analyze a set of twelve representative tariff options retailers might offer in the future. To examine their effects on load profiles and electricity bills, we set up a comprehensive empirical evaluation framework. Our analyses identify three important recommendations for residential microgrid pricing: First, energy retailers should not offer volumetric tariffs as they result in higher electricity bills, encourage sharp peak loads, and fail to fully allocate system costs. Second, they should also be cautious in offering time-varying and especially real-time rates. Although these rates promise slightly lower energy bills for microgrid operators, they can destabilize load profiles if retailers fail to simultaneously introduce peak-moderating capacity charges. Third, energy retailers should consider tariffs with capacity and customer charges, which we find to lower electricity costs, foster peak shaving, and facilitate stable cost allocation. [less ▲]

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