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See detailField Study on the Energy Consumption of School Buildings in Luxembourg
Thewes, Andreas UL; Maas, Stefan UL; Scholzen, Frank UL et al

in Energy & Buildings (2014)

Buildings account for 40 % of total energy consumption and 35 % of the total CO2 emitted in the EU. In consequence, there is an enormous energy saving potential and the European Union requires from all EU ... [more ▼]

Buildings account for 40 % of total energy consumption and 35 % of the total CO2 emitted in the EU. In consequence, there is an enormous energy saving potential and the European Union requires from all EU member states to save energy in this sector. Hence, reducing the energy consumption of buildings represents an essential component of environmental protection efforts. Furthermore, the new European directive 2010/31/EU requires that the member states tighten national standards and draw up national plans to increase the number of “nearly zero-energy buildings”. Well-planned energy-saving strategies presume knowledge of specific characteristics of the current national building stock. Therefore, the implementation of a process to support systematic data collection, classification and analysis of the energy consumption of buildings will become increasingly important during the coming years. In the field study described below we analyzed the energy consumption of 68 school buildings in Luxembourg. A separate collation of electricity and heat energy consumptions allowed to make a detailed analysis of specific energy parameters. Clustered according to energy sources, the new buildings were analyzed from a statistical point of view. We defined the energy relevant parameters such as energy standards, the purpose of use of the buildings or whether they had canteens. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasured and perceived indoor comfort versus energy efficiency and users‟ control in Luxembourg‟s new school buildings
Brensing, Jessica UL; Schweizer-Ries, Petra; Thewes, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September)

Room climate can be evident for job productivity and individual ́s health. Its realisation is often of high relevance for the building ́s energy consumption e.g. air conditioning vs. natural ventilation ... [more ▼]

Room climate can be evident for job productivity and individual ́s health. Its realisation is often of high relevance for the building ́s energy consumption e.g. air conditioning vs. natural ventilation. New school buildings in Luxembourg differ significantly regarding to energy consumption, heating, air-conditioning technology and technical control as well as interaction means given to the user. Several studies have shown that personal control plays an important role for the satisfaction with the room climate. Central research question was, how the technological control has to be designed that energy is used efficiently and users are still satisfied with the room climate. In this study technical features to control the room climate e.g. features for ventilation, opening windows and heating systems were summarized to an overall control factor to be compared with perceived control by the users. Physical room climate and its users ́ satisfaction level were measuredas well as the buildings ́ individual energy consumption levels were taken into account. 342 Teachers were asked by a standardised questionnaire during winter 2010/2011 in 31 new school buildings in Luxembourg, in 17 schools technical devices for air temperature, quality and humidity were installed. The results show a strong correlation between perceived control and room climate satisfaction as well as a significant correlation between the technical control factor and perceived control. Further results will be examined. [less ▲]

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See detailWIE VIEL ENERGIE VERBRAUCHEN NEUE UNTERRICHTS- UND BÜROGEBÄUDE IN LUXEMBURG?
Maas, Stefan UL; Scholzen, Frank UL; Thewes, Andreas UL et al

in Cahier Scientifique - Revue Technique Luxembourgeoise (2012)

In Luxemburg hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren der nationale Energieverbrauch ebenfalls verstärkt zum Gebäudesektor hin verändert. Während 1990 noch 71 % des gesamten Energieverbrauches auf den ... [more ▼]

In Luxemburg hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren der nationale Energieverbrauch ebenfalls verstärkt zum Gebäudesektor hin verändert. Während 1990 noch 71 % des gesamten Energieverbrauches auf den Industriesektor zurückzuführen waren und nur 20 % auf die Gebäude, hat sich dies bis zum Jahr 2009 deutlich verändert. Demzufolge entfallen nur noch 30 % auf den Industriesektor, 25 % auf Verkehr (nach Abzug der Treibstoffexporte) und 45 % auf den Verbrauch des Tertiären Sektors3, welcher sowohl die privaten und die öffentlichen Haushalte, als auch Dienstleistungsgebäude beinhaltet. Die Direktive 2010/31/EG2 fordert von den Mitgliedstaaten die nationalen Normen weiterhin zu verschärfen und Pläne zu erstellen, um die Anzahl an Niedrigstenergiegebäuden weiter zu erhöhen. Um die Energieströme in Gebäuden besser zu verstehen, Sparmaßnahmen zu erarbeiten und mögliche Bewertungen über das Energieeinsparpotential für Gebäude durchführen zu können, sind jedoch aussagekräftige Verbrauchsdatenanalysen notwendig, die leider oftmals noch nicht in verlässlicher Qualität vorliegen. In der Direktive wird zudem empfohlen für die Berechnung eine Unterteilung aller Gebäude in angemessene Kategorien vorzunehmen, welche von Einfamilienhäusern (EFH), über Bürogebäude und Unterrichtsgebäude bis hin zu Krankenhäuser, Hotels und Sportanlagen reicht. In einer ersten Studie der Universität Luxemburg4 wurden bereits neuere EFH in Luxemburg hinsichtlich ihres realen Energieverbrauches untersucht und ausgewertet. [less ▲]

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See detailEnergieeffizienz neuer Schul-und Bürogebäude in Luxemburg basierend auf Verbrauchsdaten und Simulationen
Thewes, Andreas UL

Doctoral thesis (2011)

In Luxemburg, energy consumption in the building and housing sector has been significantly increasing over the last years. An assessment of the energy saving potential of buildings requires a ... [more ▼]

In Luxemburg, energy consumption in the building and housing sector has been significantly increasing over the last years. An assessment of the energy saving potential of buildings requires a comprehensive data basis with real consumption figures that are not yet available. One focus of this study was to create a priori a detailed energy consumption database for new “School and Administrative Buildings” for Luxembourg. These are both groups cover a major part of the building and housing sector in Luxembourg besides residential buildings. Based on the samples collected, it was able to expand the figures to the entire country using mathematical methods and the medium heat and electricity consumption of these two types of buildings could determined. After collecting some details about each object, it was able to analyze the influence of different parameters, such as building age, size, type, glass fraction etc., on energy consumption using multivariate statistical methods. A posteriori, the results from the database were verified using parameter studies to existing objects and one object still under construction. Based on this, important key parameters relevant for both energy savings and thermal comfort could be found. This knowledge are necessary to understand energy flows within buildings better and, based on this, to be able meeting the nearly zero energy buildings requirements as set out by the EU Directive in the years to come. As conclusion, the central-European climatic zone provides opportunities to design energy-saving office and school buildings (primary energy consumption < 100 kWh/m2a) without mechanical cooling and ventilation systems that still guarantee appropriate degrees of thermal comfort. Unfortunately, the real average primary energy consumption figures of new school (187 kWh/m2a) and office buildings (677 kWh/m2a) in Luxemburg are still significantly higher. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal comfort of a new university building in Luxembourg with passive cooling
Thewes, Andreas UL; Maas, Stefan UL; Scholzen, Frank UL et al

in Thermal comfort of a new university building in Luxembourg with passive cooling (2010)

The new Luxembourgish university buildings should comply with a low energy standard, which was defined for typical offices and smaller lecture rooms by a thermal end-energy lower than 14 kWh/m3a and an ... [more ▼]

The new Luxembourgish university buildings should comply with a low energy standard, which was defined for typical offices and smaller lecture rooms by a thermal end-energy lower than 14 kWh/m3a and an electricity use for HVAC and lighting of max. 6 kWh/m3a. Consequently it was necessary to find ways to avoid the need for mechanical ventilation and air-conditioning. The heat consumption was minimized by an air-tight and well insulated building envelope. A difficulty was posed by special outside façade elements which were set-up as a grid over the complete outer surface as an architectural element. To prevent the risk of overheating during summer, it is necessary to reduce the solar gains by optimizing the window sizes and the glazing types, as well as through the installation of movable indoor shading elements. Nevertheless enough daylight should enter the rooms to limit the consumption of electricity for artificial lighting. Hence detailed dynamic simulations were performed using TRNSYS and TRNFLOW to ensure thermal comfort without active cooling. The effective electricity consumption of a newly installed state-of-the-art lighting system, including presence detectors and daylight controllers for dimming, was measured in a test installation to determine the internal loads by lighting. Radiation and illuminance measurements were performed on sample elements of the façade grid. The results were used to verify the daylight simulations and to analyze the benefits of daylight controllers. Several iterative steps were taken to gradually improve the building by introducing different modifications, e.g. reduction of the window sizes, installation of a lighting control system, improving the night ventilation and effective use of the thermal inertia of the building. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic simulations to develop a natural ventilation concept for an office building
Thewes, Andreas UL; Maas, Stefan UL; Scholzen, Frank UL et al

in 8th International Conference on System Simulation in Buildings (2010)

The Sustainability Group of the University of Luxembourg defined for their new buildings a maximum thermal end-energy of 14 kWh/(m3a) and an electricity consumption for HVAC and lighting below 6 kWh/(m3a ... [more ▼]

The Sustainability Group of the University of Luxembourg defined for their new buildings a maximum thermal end-energy of 14 kWh/(m3a) and an electricity consumption for HVAC and lighting below 6 kWh/(m3a). Therefore it was necessary to avoid active cooling loads and mechanical ventilation in the offices and small lecture rooms. The well insulated and air-tight façade, including special outside shading elements which were designed as a grid over the complete building envelope, was an essential given architectural element of the building. Therefore further external shading devices were not applicable. The only possibility to have an influence on solar gains was to optimize the window size, the glazing type and potentially an internal shading device. Furthermore, to prevent the risk of overheating during the summer period, it was necessary to reduce the internal gains from lighting and IT-equipment. Hence detailed dynamic simulations using TRNSYS and TRNFLOW were done to evaluate the thermal comfort without air-conditioning and mechanical ventilation. The effects of optimizations like a state-of-the-art lighting control system or a window-based night ventilation, as well as the influence of the effective thermal inertia of the building were analyzed. The assumed natural ventilation rates were calculated by combining TRNFLOW and TRNSYS simulations and by the software LESOCOOL. [less ▲]

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