References of "Thelen, Michael P"
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See detailA Semi-Quantitative, Synteny-Based Method to Improve Functional Predictions for Hypothetical and Poorly Annotated Bacterial and Archaeal Genes
Yelton, Alexis P.; Thomas, Brian C.; Simmons, Sheri L. et al

in PLoS Computational Biology (2011), 7(10), 1002230

During microbial evolution, genome rearrangement increases with increasing sequence divergence. If the relationship between synteny and sequence divergence can be modeled, gene clusters in genomes of ... [more ▼]

During microbial evolution, genome rearrangement increases with increasing sequence divergence. If the relationship between synteny and sequence divergence can be modeled, gene clusters in genomes of distantly related organisms exhibiting anomalous synteny can be identified and used to infer functional conservation. We applied the phylogenetic pairwise comparison method to establish and model a strong correlation between synteny and sequence divergence in all 634 available Archaeal and Bacterial genomes from the NCBI database and four newly assembled genomes of uncultivated Archaea from an acid mine drainage (AMD) community. In parallel, we established and modeled the trend between synteny and functional relatedness in the 118 genomes available in the STRING database. By combining these models, we developed a gene functional annotation method that weights evolutionary distance to estimate the probability of functional associations of syntenous proteins between genome pairs. The method was applied to the hypothetical proteins and poorly annotated genes in newly assembled acid mine drainage Archaeal genomes to add or improve gene annotations. This is the first method to assign possible functions to poorly annotated genes through quantification of the probability of gene functional relationships based on synteny at a significant evolutionary distance, and has the potential for broad application. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Acidophilic Microbial Biofilms
Jiao, Yongqin; Cody, George D.; Harding, Anna K. et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2010), 76(9), 2916-2922

We examined the chemical composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from two natural microbial pellicle biofilms growing on acid mine drainage (AMD) solutions. The EPS obtained from ... [more ▼]

We examined the chemical composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from two natural microbial pellicle biofilms growing on acid mine drainage (AMD) solutions. The EPS obtained from a mid-developmental-stage biofilm (DS1) and a mature biofilm (DS2) were qualitatively and quantitatively compared. More than twice as much EPS was derived from DS2 as from DS1 (approximately 340 and 150 mg of EPS per g [dry weight] for DS2 and DS1, respectively). Composition analyses indicated the presence of carbohydrates, metals, proteins, and minor quantities of DNA and lipids, although the relative concentrations of these components were different for the two EPS samples. EPS from DS2 contained higher concentrations of metals and carbohydrates than EPS from DS1. Fe was the most abundant metal in both samples, accounting for about 73% of the total metal content, followed by Al, Mg, and Zn. The relative concentration profile for these metals resembled that for the AMD solution in which the biofilms grew, except for Si, Mn, and Co. Glycosyl composition analysis indicated that both EPS samples were composed primarily of galactose, glucose, heptose, rhamnose, and mannose, while the relative amounts of individual sugars were substantially different in DS1 and DS2. Additionally, carbohydrate linkage analysis revealed multiply linked heptose, galactose, glucose, mannose, and rhamnose, with some of the glucose in a 4-linked form. These results indicate that the biochemical composition of the EPS from these acidic biofilms is dependent on maturity and is controlled by the microbial communities, as well as the local geochemical environment. [less ▲]

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See detailNatural acidophilic biofilm communities reflect distinct organismal and functional organization
Wilmes, Paul UL; Remis, Jonathan P.; Hwang, Mona et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2009), 3(2), 266-270

Pellicle biofilms colonize the air-solution interface of underground acid mine drainage (AMD) streams and pools within the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, CA, USA). They exhibit relatively low ... [more ▼]

Pellicle biofilms colonize the air-solution interface of underground acid mine drainage (AMD) streams and pools within the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, CA, USA). They exhibit relatively low species richness and, consequently, represent good model systems to study natural microbial community structure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with epifluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed spatially and temporally defined microbial assemblages. Leptospirillum group II dominates the earliest developmental stages of stream pellicles. With increasing biofilm maturity, the proportion of archaea increases in conjunction with the appearance of eukaryotes. In contrast, mature pool pellicles are stratified with a densely packed bottom layer of Leptospirillum group II, a less dense top layer composed mainly of archaea and no eukarya. Immunohistochemical detection of Leptospirillum group II cytochrome 579 indicates a high abundance of this protein at the interface of the biofilm with the AMD solution. Consequently, community architecture, which most likely develops in response to chemical gradients across the biofilm, is reflected at the functional gene expression level. [less ▲]

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