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See detailMultiscale Integration of High-Resolution Spaceborne and Drone-Based Imagery for a High-Accuracy Digital Elevation Model Over Tristan da Cunha
Backes, Dietmar UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL

in Frontiers in Earth Science (2020)

Very high-resolution (VHR) optical Earth observation (EO) satellites as well as low-altitude and easy-to-use unmanned aerial systems (UAS/drones) provide ever-improving data sources for the generation of ... [more ▼]

Very high-resolution (VHR) optical Earth observation (EO) satellites as well as low-altitude and easy-to-use unmanned aerial systems (UAS/drones) provide ever-improving data sources for the generation of detailed 3-dimensional (3D) data using digital photogrammetric methods with dense image matching. Today both data sources represent cost-effective alternatives to dedicated airborne sensors, especially for remote regions. The latest generation of EO satellites can collect VHR imagery up to 0.30 m ground sample distance (GSD) of even the most remote location from different viewing angles many times per year. Consequently, well-chosen scenes from growing image archives enable the generation of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). Furthermore, low-cost and easy to use drones can be quickly deployed in remote regions to capture blocks of images of local areas. Dense point clouds derived from these methods provide an invaluable data source to fill the gap between globally available low-resolution DEMs and highly accurate terrestrial surveys. Here we investigate the use of archived VHR satellite imagery with approx. 0.5 m GSD as well as low-altitude drone-based imagery with average GSD of better than 0.03 m to generate high-quality DEMs using photogrammetric tools over Tristan da Cunha, a remote island in the South Atlantic Ocean which lies beyond the reach of current commercial manned airborne mapping platforms. This study explores the potentials and limitations to combine this heterogeneous data sources to generate improved DEMs in terms of accuracy and resolution. A cross-validation between low-altitude airborne and spaceborne data sets describes the fit between both optical data sets. No co-registration error, scale difference or distortions were detected, and a quantitative cloud-to-cloud comparison showed an average distance of 0.26 m between both point clouds. Both point clouds were merged applying a conventional georeferenced approach. The merged DEM preserves the rich detail from the drone-based survey and provides an accurate 3D representation of the entire study area. It provides the most detailed model of the island to date, suitable to support practical and scientific applications. This study demonstrates that combination archived VHR satellite and low-altitude drone-based imagery provide inexpensive alternatives to generate high-quality DEMs. [less ▲]

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See detailBIM-Based End-of-Lifecycle Decision Making and Digital Deconstruction: Literature Review
Akbarieh, Arghavan UL; Jayasinghe, Laddu Bhagya UL; Waldmann, Danièle UL et al

in Sustainability (2020), 12(7), 2670

This article is the second part of a two-part study, which explored the extent to which Building Information Modelling (BIM) is used for End-of-Lifecycle (EoL) scenario selection to minimise the ... [more ▼]

This article is the second part of a two-part study, which explored the extent to which Building Information Modelling (BIM) is used for End-of-Lifecycle (EoL) scenario selection to minimise the Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW). The conventional literature review presented here is based on the conceptual landscape that was obtained from the bibliometric and scientometric analysis in the first part of the study. Seven main academic research directions concerning the BIM-based EoL domain were found, including social and cultural factors, BIM-based Design for Deconstruction (DfD), BIM-based deconstruction, BIM-based EoL within LCA, BIM-aided waste management, Material and Component Banks (M/C Banks), off-site construction, interoperability and Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). The analysis highlights research gaps in the path of raw materials to reusable materials, i.e., from the deconstruction to M/C banks to DfD-based designs and then again to deconstruction. BIM-based EoL is suffering from a lack of a global framework. The existing solutions are based on local waste management policies and case-specific sustainability criteria selection. Another drawback of these ad hoc but well-developed BIM-based EoL prototypes is their use of specific proprietary BIM tools to support their framework. This disconnection between BIM tools and EoL tools is reportedly hindering the BIM-based EoL, while no IFC classes support the EoL phase information exchange. [less ▲]

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See detailTracking Hurricanes using GPS atmospheric precipitable water vapor field
Ejigu, Yohannes Getachew; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; klos, Anna et al

in Beyond 100: The Next Century in Geodesy (2020)

Tropical cyclones are one of the most powerful severe weather events that produce devastating socioeconomic and environmental impacts in the areas they strike. Therefore, monitoring and tracking of the ... [more ▼]

Tropical cyclones are one of the most powerful severe weather events that produce devastating socioeconomic and environmental impacts in the areas they strike. Therefore, monitoring and tracking of the arrival times and path of the tropical cyclones are extremely valuable in providing early warning to the public and governments. Hurricane Florence struck the East cost of USA in 2018 and offers an outstanding case study. We employed Global Positioning System (GPS) derived precipitable water vapor (PWV) data to track and investigate the characteristics of storm occurrences in their spatial and temporal distribution using a dense ground network of permanent GPS stations. Our findings indicate that a rise in GPS-derived PWV occurred several hours before Florence’s manifestation. Also, we compared the temporal distribution of the GPS-derived PWV content with the precipitation value for days when the storm appeared in the area under influence. The study will contribute to quantitative assessment of the complementary GPS tropospheric products in hurricane monitoring and tracking using GPS-derived water vapor evolution from a dense network of permanent GPS stations [less ▲]

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See detailMarkov Chain Monte Carlo and the Application to Geodetic Time Series Analysis
Olivares Pulido, German UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL

in Montillet, Jean-Philippe; Bos, Machiel (Eds.) Geodetic Time Series Analysis in Earth Sciences (2020)

The time evolution of geophysical phenomena can be characterised by stochastic time series. The stochastic nature of the signal stems from the geophysical phenomena involved and any noise, which may be ... [more ▼]

The time evolution of geophysical phenomena can be characterised by stochastic time series. The stochastic nature of the signal stems from the geophysical phenomena involved and any noise, which may be due to, e.g., un-modelled effects or measurement errors. Until the 1990's, it was usually assumed that white noise could fully characterise this noise. However, this was demonstrated to be not the case and it was proven that this assumption leads to underestimated uncertainties of the geophysical parameters inferred from the geodetic time series. Therefore, in order to fully quantify all the uncertainties as robustly as possible, it is imperative to estimate not only the deterministic but also the stochastic parameters of the time series. In this regard, the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method can provide a sample of the distribution function of all parameters, including those regarding the noise, e.g., spectral index and amplitudes. After presenting the MCMC method and its implementation in our MCMC software we apply it to synthetic and real time series and perform a cross-evaluation using Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) as implemented in the CATS software. Several examples as to how the MCMC method performs as a parameter estimation method for geodetic time series are given in this chapter. These include the applications to GPS position time series, superconducting gravity time series and monthly mean sea level (MSL) records, which all show very different stochastic properties. The impact of the estimated parameter uncertainties on sub-sequentially derived products is briefly demonstrated for the case of plate motion models. Finally, the MCMC results for weekly downsampled versions of the benchmark synthetic GNSS time series as provided in Chapter 2 are presented separately in an appendix. [less ▲]

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See detailConsolidating Observation of Land and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Hibbert, Angela et al

Poster (2019, December 13)

With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. Since 2013 the tide gauge at King Edward Point ... [more ▼]

With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. Since 2013 the tide gauge at King Edward Point (KEP) with GLOSS ID 187 has been monitored using a GNSS station nearby on Brown Mountain. By accurately geo-referencing the tide gauge and monitoring any vertical land movements, a continuous record of its datum within the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) can be established, which in turn makes the recorded and averaged sea levels useful for long-term studies and satellite altimetry calibrations. In 2014 another GNSS station was installed at KEP after local subsidence was sus-pected and later on three additional GNSS stations came to service at the periphery of the main island, making it possible to monitor uplift/subsidence wider afield. Further-more, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, i.e. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the results from the GNSS and precise levelling meas-urements, and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge and nearby satellite altimetry sea surface heights. This study comes at a timely manner as during the Austral Summer 2019/2020 the jetty will be stabilized and en-larged, and consequently the current tide gauge will be replaced by a new one. Our measurements show that uplift is observed all over South Georgia Island while the ar-ea at KEP and particularly the jetty with tide gauge are subsiding relative to the rest of the island. In contrast, results for the tide gauge record show a lower magnitude of ob-served sea level rise than expected from nearby satellite altimetry. We will revisit all geodetic and oceanic observations in an attempt to improve the agreement between these measurements to summarize the status before the work at the jetty begins. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing the Vertical Land Movement estimates from the IGS TIGA combined solution to derive Global Mean Sea Level changes
Bogusz, Janusz; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, December 13)

Global mean sea level (GMSL) is now widely recognized to have risen between 1 to 2 mm/yr depending on location since the 20th century. Prior to the satellite altimetry era, GMSL was primarily estimated ... [more ▼]

Global mean sea level (GMSL) is now widely recognized to have risen between 1 to 2 mm/yr depending on location since the 20th century. Prior to the satellite altimetry era, GMSL was primarily estimated from a set of secular tide gauge records relative to coastal benchmarks. Recent measurements of GPS (Global Positioning System) have been demonstrated as a useful tool of a direct estimate of Vertical Land Motion (VLM) induced by both long and short-term geophysical and human-induced processes in a geocentric reference frame. This presentation will provide the results of a combination performed using the CATREF software of three independent GPS daily solutions provided by British Isles continuous GNSS Facility – University of Luxembourg consortium (BLT), German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and University of La Rochelle (ULR) under the auspices of the Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG), that results in a spatially comprehensive map of VLM near or close to tide gauge benchmarks. The combination was performed in accordance with the second re-processing campaign (repro2) of the IGS (International GNSS Service). Long coastal tide gauge records from the archives maintained at the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) were extracted for relative sea level estimates. To cross-compare the sea level rates over the years, we employed observations between 1900-2016. Then, the time series were cut and analyzed separately, ceteris paribus, for the period 1960-2016. This analysis was aimed at a cross-comparison of relative sea level trends and their changes over the years. The stochastic part of the tide gauge records was analyzed with Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) and assumed several different combinations of noise models with the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) providing a means to identify the preferred one. The relative sea level estimates were corrected by the inverted barometric effect to the tide-gauge records using data from the 20th century Reanalysis project version V2C, the effect of wind stress on the surface of the ocean in both, zonal and meridional components, as well as Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) influencing Pacific tide gauge records. The GPS-based velocities were corrected by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) effect using ICE-6G(VM5a) model with associated geoid rate and post seismic decays using ITRF2014 estimates. Also, environmental loading models were employed to account for present-day elastic loading in VLM. The Mean Sea Level (MSL) trends from tide gauges and VLM-corrected MSL trends using GIA model (TG+GIA) and the TIGA combination (TG+TIGA) were determined. Our final reconstruction of GMSL based on the MSL records from 1900 to 2016 where the VLM uncertainty is smaller than 0.7 mm/yr indicate a long-term trend of 1.75 +/- 0.2 mm/yr and is in good agreement with several similar determinations. [less ▲]

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See detailConventional EO Satellites vs. CubeSats; FDL - AI flood detection onboard a Nano Satellite
Backes, Dietmar UL; Schumann, Guy; Teferle, Felix Norman UL

Scientific Conference (2019, December 11)

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See detailTracking hurricanes Harvey and Irma using GPS tropospheric products
Ejigu, Yohannes Getachew; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL et al

Poster (2019, December 10)

The 2017 Hurricanes season was one of the most powerful severe weather events producing catastrophic socio-economic and environmental effects on the east coast of the United States. Therefore, tracking ... [more ▼]

The 2017 Hurricanes season was one of the most powerful severe weather events producing catastrophic socio-economic and environmental effects on the east coast of the United States. Therefore, tracking their path accurately is extremely useful. Today Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tropospheric products, such as Zenith Wet Delays (ZWD), and Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) are used as complementary data sets in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. In this study, we employed GPS-derived IWV and horizontal tropospheric gradient information to monitor and investigate the complicated characteristics of hurricane events in their spatial and temporal distribution using a dense ground network of GPS stations. Our results show that a surge in GPS-derived IWV occurred several hours prior to the manifestation of the major hurricanes Harvey and Irma. We used the derived GPS-derived IWV information as input to spaghetti lines weather models, allowing us to predict the paths of Harvey and Irma hurricanes. As such, a parameter directly estimated from GPS can provide an additional resource for improving the monitoring of hurricane paths [less ▲]

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See detailRezente geodätische Akvtitäten im Südatlantik: GNSS und Pegelinstallationen auf Südgeorgien und Tristan da Cunha
Teferle, Felix Norman UL

Presentation (2019, December 05)

Provides details of the recent scientific activities in South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha giving some of the latest results. This is a combination of the results presented at IUGG2019 and ISAES2019.

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See detailA comparison between conventional Earth Observation Satellites and CubeSats; Requirements, Capabilities and Data Quality
Backes, Dietmar UL; Hassani, Saif Alislam UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 11)

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an ... [more ▼]

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an enthusiastic community led to the development of new Earth Observation (EO) technology concepts based on large constellations of satellites with high-resolution optical imagers previously considered as infeasible. Probably the most significant constellation today is deployed by Planet who are currently operating a fleet larger than 120 3U Dove satellites, which provide an imaging service with up to 3m Ground Sample Distance (GSD). The number of low-cost EO Cubesat systems is constantly increasing. However, for a number of reasons there still seems to be a reluctance to use such data for many EO applications. A better understanding of the capabilities of the current generation of small Cubesats compared to the traditional well-established bigger operational missions of high and medium resolution EO satellites is required. What are the critical capabilities and quality indicators? Due to the limited size and weight of Cubesats, critical system components, e.g. for navigation and communication, always compete with operational payloads such as optical camera/sensor systems. A functional EO system requires balanced payload, which provides adequate navigational capabilities, that match the requirements of the optical imagers (camera) deployed with the system. This study reviews the current performance and capabilities of Cubesats for optical EO and compares them to the capabilities of conventional, dedicated high and medium resolution EO systems. We summarise key performance parameters and quality indicators to evaluate the difference between the systems. An empirical study compares recent very high-resolution (VHR) imagery from big EO satellite missions with available images from Cubesats for the use case in disaster monitoring. Small and agile Nanosatellites or Cubesats already show remarkable performance. Although it is not expected that their performance and capability will match those of current bigger EO satellite missions, they are expected to provide a valuable tool for EO and remote sensing, in particular for downstream industry applications. [less ▲]

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See detailOn Recent Activities at GNSS@TG Stations in the South Atlantic Ocean and the Tracking of Hurricanes Using GNSS
Teferle, Felix Norman UL

Presentation (2019, August 07)

Guest lecture to third year students in Geomatics and Geoinformation at the University of Cape Town. The topics covered the geodetic activities in the South Atlantic Ocean and the tracking of hurricanes ... [more ▼]

Guest lecture to third year students in Geomatics and Geoinformation at the University of Cape Town. The topics covered the geodetic activities in the South Atlantic Ocean and the tracking of hurricanes both involving GNSS. The contents were recently presented orally at IUGG 2019 and ISAES 2019. [less ▲]

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See detailPresent-Day Land and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island: Results from Precise Levelling, GNSS, Tide Gauge and Satellite Altimetry Measurements
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Dalziel, I W D; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 25)

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the northernmost tip of the Antarctic peninsular. The SGM is believed to lie south of the North Scotia Ridge (NSR), which forms the boundary to the South America Plate, while to the south it is bordered by the Scotia Plate (SP). In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by mountain glaciers which have been reported to be retreating due to climatic change. Furthermore, during past glaciation periods the island and its shelf area, stretching much of the SGM, have been ice covered as was revealed by scarring of the sub-oceanic topography. Together with ongoing tectonics along the NSR and recent seismicity at the SP boundary, these processes have the ability to produce significant uplift on local to regional scales. With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. As these net-works suffer from a Hemisphere imbalance with the number of stations in the Northern Hemisphere outnumbering those in the Southern Hemisphere, operating these stations to the highest standards is of key scientific value. It is of particular interest to monitor the tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) at King Edward Point (KEP) for vertical land movements to establish a continuous record of its datum within the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), which in turn makes it useful for long-term sea level studies and satellite altimetry calibrations. With the establishment of five GNSS stations on the islands by teams from Luxembourg, the UK and the USA during 2013 to 2015, and the scientific analysis of these data within a global network of stations, it has now become possible to study present-day vertical land movements and their impacts. Furthermore, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, i.e. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the still preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding, leading to a lower magnitude of the observed sea level change than expected from satellite altimetry. In order to improve the agreement between these measurements both local and regional vertical land movements need to be monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent Activities on Tristan da Cunha Island: Geodetic Installations, Local Tie Measurements and their Analysis
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Backes, Dietmar UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 11)

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on ... [more ▼]

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on Tristan da Cunha Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. These installations were funded through various projects at both collaborating institutions under the umbrella of the International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) focus area on Sea Level Change, Variability and Forecasting. While this was the first scientific installation of a GNSS station on the main island within the Tristan da Cunha archipelago, IGS station GOUG, located on Gough Island which lies 412 km to the south, has been in operation since 1998. Unfortunately GOUG was decommissioned in 2018. Sea level observations on Tristan da Cunha have a longer history than GNSS with various tide gauges having been in operation since 1984. Tristan da Cunha also hosts a Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) station which was established in 2012 after a previous installation was upgraded and moved to the current site. The antenna TCTA is located on the concrete monument of the previous DORIS antenna. Furthermore, in order for future International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) computations to fully benefit from the proximity of the sensors, the geodetic ties between the respective antennas (and reference markers in case of the tide gauges) need to be determined at the millimeter level using various terrestrial surveying methods and a local benchmark network. This contribution provides details of the activities on Tristan da Cunha including the installations, the established benchmark network, the terrestrial surveys of the geodetic ties and the analysis of these measurements in order to geometrically link the GNSS and DORIS antennas to each other as well as to the tide gauges. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a high-resolution drone-based 3D mapping dataset to optimise flood hazard modelling
Backes, Dietmar UL; Schumann, Guy; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

in International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences (2019, June), XLII-2/W13

The occurrence of urban flooding following strong rainfall events may increase as a result of climate change. Urban expansion, ageing infrastructure and an increasing number of impervious surfaces are ... [more ▼]

The occurrence of urban flooding following strong rainfall events may increase as a result of climate change. Urban expansion, ageing infrastructure and an increasing number of impervious surfaces are further exacerbating flooding. To increase resilience and support flood mitigation, bespoke accurate flood modelling and reliable prediction is required. However, flooding in urban areas is most challenging. State-of-the-art flood inundation modelling is still often based on relatively low-resolution 2.5 D bare earth models with 2-5m GSD. Current systems suffer from a lack of precise input data and numerical instabilities and lack of other important data, such as drainage networks. Especially, the quality and resolution of the topographic input data represents a major source of uncertainty in urban flood modelling. A benchmark study is needed that defines the accuracy requirements for highly detailed urban flood modelling and to improve our understanding of important threshold processes and limitations of current methods and 3D mapping data alike. This paper presents the first steps in establishing a new, innovative multiscale data set suitable to benchmark urban flood modelling. The final data set will consist of high-resolution 3D mapping data acquired from different airborne platforms, focusing on the use of drones (optical and LiDAR). The case study includes residential as well as rural areas in Dudelange/Luxembourg, which have been prone to localized flash flooding following strong rainfall events in recent years. The project also represents a cross-disciplinary collaboration between the geospatial and flood modelling community. In this paper, we introduce the first steps to build up a new benchmark data set together with some initial flood modelling results. More detailed investigations will follow in the next phases of this project. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved Monitoringand Tracking Hurricanes using GPS Atmospheric WaterVapour
Ejigu, Yohannes Getachew; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; klose, Anna et al

Poster (2019, April 09)

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See detailCurvature based DAD-method for damage localisation under consideration of measurement noise minimisation
Erdenebat, Dolgion UL; Waldmann, Danièle UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL

in Engineering Structures (2019), 181

Several research projects on condition assessment of bridges have proven that structural responses from dynamic excitation or static loading are influenced by local damages and thus, could be used for the ... [more ▼]

Several research projects on condition assessment of bridges have proven that structural responses from dynamic excitation or static loading are influenced by local damages and thus, could be used for the detection and localisation of damages. Particularly, the curvature of structures is directly depending on their stiffness. In order to localise the discontinuities in curvature lines resulting from damage, this paper uses the so-called Deformation Area Difference Method (DAD), which is based on static load deflection tests on bridge structures. The DAD-method for damage localisation is presented within the paper using a theoretical example, which is then verified by two laboratory experiments. The first experiment consists of a reinforced concrete beam, which is loaded stepwise until failure of the concrete in the compression zone. Due to the load increase, the tensile zone of the beam starts cracking, leading to a stiffness reduction. The application of the DAD-method allows identifying the cracked area from the measurement of the deflection line. However, a challenge and a prerequisite for the applicability of the DAD-method is the highly accurate measurement of the deflection line. Therefore, one of the most modern measurement techniques such as digital photogrammetry is applied. Nonetheless, the accuracy of each measurement technique is limited. The second laboratory experiment consists of a steel beam, which is locally damaged at three positions. The degree of the damage is stepwise increased in order to identify at which degree of damage the applied DAD-method is still able to identify and localise damage. In this work, the focus lies on the minimisation of the effect of noise resulting from the limited measurement precision. Possible solutions were examined and proposed based on methods such as data smoothing using polynomial regression, consideration of standard deviation and measurement point variation. The reduction of the noise effect leads to an increase in the sensitivity of the damage localisation. The DAD-method has proven its potential for practical application through the successful localisation of cracking in the concrete beam. [less ▲]

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