References of "Stevenson, Jim"
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See detailSocial acceptance and peer relationships of children with physical disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2017, August 24)

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also ... [more ▼]

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also promotes social participation. Although social participation partly depends on the opportunity of social interaction with peers (Kirpalani et al., 2000), other factors such as social competence and peer acceptance are important too (e.g. Schwab et al., 2013). Children with special needs are often found to be socially excluded by peers (Garrote & Dessemontet, 2015) and have fewer friends than their typically developing peers (e.g. Eriksson et al., 2007). Research has also indicated that the incidence of social maladjustment problems in children with disabilities is at least twice of that for typically developing children (Goodman & Graham, 1996; Wallander et al., 1989). Hence children with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable in regards to their peer relationships and social participation. Method: Data were collected for a clinical sample of 87 children (aged 6-18 years) with disabilities (i.e. hydrocephalus with or without spina bifida) and 57 typical developing children. Children or parents completed measures on social acceptance (the Self-Perception Profile, Harter, 1985; Harter & Pike, 1984), peer problems and prosocial behaviour (SDQ; Goodman, 1997, 1999), friendship (Berndt et al., 1986) and perceived quality of life (Graham, Stevenson, & Flynn, 1997). Results: Parent and child ratings of social acceptance and peer problems indicated children with disabilities felt less accepted and experienced more peer problems than typically developing children. No differences in prosocial behaviour were found. Although parents of children with disabilities rated the quality of life regarding friendships lower than parents of typically developing children, no differences in child ratings were found. Children with disabilities rated their friendships as less positive compared to typically developing children. Variance in the perceived quality of life could be explained by peer problems and friendship ratings but not social acceptance or peer problems. Conclusion: Friendship and peer relationships emerged as an area of specific difficulty for children with disabilities. These problems were reflected in reports of lower social acceptance, more peer problems and less positive friendship ratings. Child rated quality of life in the domain of friendship was predicted by peer problems and quality of friendship but not social acceptance. Although parents and children were generally in agreement, this study demonstrates the importance of collecting data from different sources, including the children with disabilities themselves. [less ▲]

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See detailThe social inclusion of students with physical disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2017, March)

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See detailSpina bifida
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

in Ayers, S.; Baum, A.; McManus, C. (Eds.) et al Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health, & Medicine (2007)

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See detailAssessment of health related quality of life in individuals with neural tube defects
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Wyszynski, D. F. (Ed.) Neural Tube defects: From origin to treatment (2006)

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See detailThe nature of hyperactivity in children and adolescents with hydrocephalus: a test of the dual pathway mode
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Neural Plasticity (2004), 11(1-2), 13-21

To determine the strength and nature of the association between hydrocephalus and hyperactivity and to test the dual pathway model (DPM) of AD/HD, we compared a group of 51 children and adolescents with ... [more ▼]

To determine the strength and nature of the association between hydrocephalus and hyperactivity and to test the dual pathway model (DPM) of AD/HD, we compared a group of 51 children and adolescents with hydrocephalus with 57 normally developing controls from the general population on a battery of neuropsychological assessments. The mean hyperactivity scores were significantly greater in the group with hydrocephalus (effect size = 0.94). This association was not just part of a general elevated rate of behavior problems and was not affected by sex or age. Variation in the clinical features of hydrocephalus was not related to the severity of hyperactivity. Path analysis was used to examine the relation between IQ, delay aversion, and executive function. In accordance with the DPM, the effect of hydrocephalus on hyperactivity was completely mediated via delay aversion and executive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailPeer relations and neuropsychological abilities in children with hydrocephalus and/or spina bifida
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2002, October)

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See detailThe nature of hyperactivity in children with hydrocephalus
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2002, October)

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See detailBehaviour problems and expressed emotion in children with spina bifida and/or hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2002, September)

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See detailDisability and quality of life in spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Kennedy, Collin; Stevenson, Jim

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement (2002), 44(5), 317-322

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 and 13 years with spina bifida (n=62), hydrocephalus (n=354), and spina bifida plus hydrocephalus (n=128) were identified via the register of the Association for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (ASBAH). Parents completed standardized measures of Child Health Related Quality Of Life (CQOL), family needs survey (FNS), and caregiving self-efficacy scale (CSES) as well as questions on children's health and physical ability. Results showed there were no significant differences in the overall quality of life for the three disability conditions. The overall CQOL was over 1 SD lower for those with spina bifida and hydrocephalus than for children with other physical conditions. Sex and age were not related to overall CQOL. Specific aspects of CQOL differentiated the three groups. Children with spina. bifida had poorer CQOL scores on self-care, continence, and mobility/activities whilst those with hydrocephalus had poorer scores on school activities, worries, sight, and communication. Severity of condition and family resources, i.e. CSES and FNS, predicted 32% of the variance in CQOL. Associations were also found between overall CQOL and problems discernible at birth as well as epilepsy. Other factors, including those related to shunts, were not significantly related to CQOL. It was concluded that hydrocephalus is just as great a threat to CQOL as spina bifida. Beyond the general effect of condition severity on CQOL, family resources (as measured by the CSES and FNS) represent an additional influence on CQOL. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationship between body image and psychosocial adjustment in adolescents with spina bifida
Fulcher, A.B:; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Poster (2001, September)

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See detailDisability and quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2000, June)

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See detailThe impact on parents of behaviour problems in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (1999, November)

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