References of "Steveker, Lena 50040175"
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See detailThe Politics of Happiness in Richard Brome’s The Queen and Concubine
Steveker, Lena UL

in Critical Survey (2020), 32(3), 70-81

Drama written for the commercial stage during the 1630s has long been seen as falling neatly into two categories: the majority of plays is seen as reflecting a courtly taste for cultural escapism believed ... [more ▼]

Drama written for the commercial stage during the 1630s has long been seen as falling neatly into two categories: the majority of plays is seen as reflecting a courtly taste for cultural escapism believed to have been cultivated during a time in which the court increasingly found itself in opposition to the rest of the country. In contrast, a smaller group of plays is read as 'opposition drama' voicing thinly veiled discontent with Charles I’s personal rule. In this article, I challenge this critical dichotomy by arguing that Richard Brome’s The Queen and Concubine, written for the King’s Revels company in 1635-36, affirms notions of good government which are central to Caroline ideals of kingship. As I show, Brome’s play uses its female protagonist Eulalia, banished Queen of Sicily, in order to promote a politics of happiness that draws on the iconography of Charles I as well as on ideals of statecraft endorsed by the English king in the 1630s. [less ▲]

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See detailTelling Tales of Empire in Contemporary British Popular Culture
Steveker, Lena UL

in Habermann, Ina; Krug, Christian (Eds.) And Hereby Hangs a Tale: A Critical Anatomy of (Popular) Tales (2020)

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See detailDickens as an Agent of Change
Steveker, Lena UL; Frenk, Joachim

Book published by Cornell University Press - 2nd ed. (2019)

Sixteen scholars from across the globe come together in Charles Dickens as an Agent of Change to show how Dickens was (and still is) the consummate change agent. His works, bursting with restless energy ... [more ▼]

Sixteen scholars from across the globe come together in Charles Dickens as an Agent of Change to show how Dickens was (and still is) the consummate change agent. His works, bursting with restless energy in the Inimitable's protean style, registered and commented on the ongoing changes in the Victorian world while the Victorians' fictional and factional worlds kept (and keep) changing. The essays from notable Dickens scholars—Malcolm Andrews, Matthias Bauer, Joel J. Brattin, Doris Feldmann, Herbert Foltinek, Robert Heaman, Michael Hollington, Bert Hornback, Norbert Lennartz, Chris Louttit, Jerome Meckier, Nancy Aycock Metz, David Paroissien, Christopher Pittard, and Robert Tracy—suggest the many ways in which the notion of change has found entry into and is negotiated in Dickens' works through four aspects: social change, political and ideological change, literary change, and cultural change. An afterword by the late Edgar Rosenberg adds a personal account of how Dickens changed the life of one eminent Dickensian. [less ▲]

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See detailRobert Eaglestone, ed., Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses, London & New York: Routledge, 2018.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Journal for the Study of British Cultures (JSBC) (2019), 26(1), 221-223

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See detailEnglands dramatische Geschichte: Shakespeares Histories
Steveker, Lena UL

in Singh, Sikander; Leber, Manfred (Eds.) Literatur und Geschichte (2018)

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See detailIntroduction
Steveker, Lena UL; Gruss, Susanne

in Journal for the Study of British Cultures (2018), 25(2), 121-128

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See detailEarly Modern Spectacles
Steveker, Lena UL; Gruss, Susanne

in Journal for the Study of British Cultures (2018), 25(2), 127

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See detailA. S. Byatt, Possession (1990)
Steveker, Lena UL

in Reinfandt, Christoph (Ed.) Handbook of the English Novel of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries (2017)

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See detailDickens as an Agent of Change
Steveker, Lena UL; Frenk, Joachim

Book published by AMS Press - 1 ed. (2015)

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See detailAlternative Worlds: Popular Fiction (Not Only) for Children.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Berberich, Christine (Ed.) The Bloomsbury Introduction to Popular Fiction (2014)

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See detail‘Eminent Victorians’ and Neo-Victorian Fictional Biography.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Böhm-Schnitker, Nadine; Gruss, Susanne (Eds.) Neo-Victorian Literature and Culture: Immersions and Revisitations (2014)

Taking her cue from the contemporary interest in both life-writing and Victorian individuals, Steveker focuses on the genre of neo-Victorian fictional biography. Providing close readings of Adam Foulds’s ... [more ▼]

Taking her cue from the contemporary interest in both life-writing and Victorian individuals, Steveker focuses on the genre of neo-Victorian fictional biography. Providing close readings of Adam Foulds’s The Quickening Maze (2009) and Richard Flanagan’s Wanting (2009), Steveker argues that these two novels not only undermine clichéd perceptions of the ‘eminent Victorians’ whose lives they depict, but also question the idealised image of the Victorian age as a period of confident humanism and individual self-respect. Making two Victorian authors return as neo-Victorian fictional characters, Foulds’s and Flanagan’s novels exemplify the desire of repetition which is symptomatic of the neo-Victorian project. [less ▲]

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See detailEnglish News Plays of the Early 1620s: Thomas Middleton's A Game at Chess and Ben Jon-son's The Staple of News.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Davies, Simon; Fletcher, Puck (Eds.) News in Early Modern Europe: Currents and Connections. . Leiden: Brill, 2014. 215-229. (2014)

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See detailPrecarious Selves in Contemporary British War Novels
Steveker, Lena UL

in Korte, Barbara; Régard, Frédéric (Eds.) Narrating 'Precariousness': Modes, Media, Ethics (2014)

This essay takes its cue from Butler's notion of precariousness, delineated in her study Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (2004). But while Butler is concerned with the events of 9/11 ... [more ▼]

This essay takes its cue from Butler's notion of precariousness, delineated in her study Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (2004). But while Butler is concerned with the events of 9/11 as the US-American seminal catastrophe of the early twenty-first century, this essay focuses on fictional representations of WWI and WWII, the two wars which turned out to determine European and, indeed, World politics throughout the twentieth century. The novels discussed in this essay are examples of how fictional texts of both the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries are involved in critically (re)evaluating the British perspective on these two wars which can be described, each for its own particular cultural, political and ideological reasons, as having exposed the precariousness of human existence. Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy (1991-1995) is engaged in demythologizing WWI as a 'great' war. A.L. Kennedy’s Day (2007) is concerned with undermining the notion of WWII as a 'just' war the British fought in defence of civilization and humanity. Each novel problematizes the damaging effects which the inhumane conditions of industrial warfare have on human psychic stability. Both Barker's trilogy and Kennedy's novel feature protagonists whose traumatic war experiences have caused them to develop split personalities; and it is with the help of these characters' mental instabilities that the texts negotiate the precarious consequences entailed in a self's complete loss of control and power over one's own well-being. Next to discussing each author's particular representational strategy of narrating her protagonist's split into self and internal other, the essay also analyses the different ideological agendas underlying Barker's and Kennedy's texts. As the essay shows, both writers' protagonists strive to reconcile self and internal other in order to reaffirm their identities. But while Kennedy's Day is indebted to liberal humanism in its celebration of 'high' art and its supposed unifying effects on human Selfhood, Barker's novels suggest a reconciliation of traumatized self and internal other which is best analysed through the lens of Levinasian ethics. The Regeneration trilogy, the essay argues, privileges a concept of dual, if not multiple selfhood by representing healing as the ethical acceptance of difference, not its repression or expulsion. Thus, Barker's novels defy the violence which, according to Levinas, comes from subjecting the other to the self's understanding. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction: Not Shakespeare - New Approaches to Drama in the Seventeenth Century.
Steveker, Lena UL; Gruss, Susanne; Zirker, Angelika

in Mergenthal, Silvia; Nikisch, Reingard M (Eds.) Proceedings: Anglistentag 2013 Konstanz (2014)

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See detailNeue Welten neu entdeckt: Shakespeares Tempest
Steveker, Lena UL

in Bogner, Ralph; Leber, Manfred (Eds.) Klassiker Neu-Lektüren (2013)

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See detailRuinous Fathers, Lethal Mothers: A Response to June Sturrock
Steveker, Lena UL

in Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate (2012), 22(1), 157-161

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See detail‘My Solitude is my Treasure, the best thing I have’: A.S. Byatt's Female Artists.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Pankratz, Anette; Puschmann-Nalenz, Barbara (Eds.) Portraits of the Artist as a Young Thing in British, Irish and Canadian Fiction after 1945 (2012)

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See detailHeroism in the Harry Potter Series
Steveker, Lena UL; Berndt, Katrin

Book published by Ashgate (2011)

Taking up the various conceptions of heroism that are conjured in the Harry Potter series, this collection examines the ways fictional heroism in the twenty-first century challenges the idealized forms of ... [more ▼]

Taking up the various conceptions of heroism that are conjured in the Harry Potter series, this collection examines the ways fictional heroism in the twenty-first century challenges the idealized forms of a somewhat simplistic masculinity associated with genres like the epic, romance and classic adventure story. The collection's three sections address broad issues related to genre, Harry Potter's development as the central heroic character and the question of who qualifies as a hero in the Harry Potter series. Among the topics are Harry Potter as both epic and postmodern hero, the series as a modern-day example of psychomachia, the series' indebtedness to the Gothic tradition, Harry's development in the first six film adaptations, Harry Potter and the idea of the English gentleman, Hermione Granger's explicitly female version of heroism, adult role models in Harry Potter, and the complex depictions of heroism exhibited by the series' minor characters. Together, the essays suggest that the Harry Potter novels rely on established generic, moral and popular codes to develop new and genuine ways of expressing what a globalized world has applauded as ethically exemplary models of heroism based on responsibility, courage, humility and kindness. [less ▲]

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