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See detailOpposite feedback from mTORC1 to H-ras and K-ras4B downstream of SREBP1
Posada, IMD; Lectez, B; Siddiqui, FA et al

in Scientific Reports (2017)

As a major growth factor transducer, Ras is an upstream activator of mTORC1, which further integrates nutrient and energy inputs. To ensure a contextual coupling of cell division via Ras/MAPK-signalling ... [more ▼]

As a major growth factor transducer, Ras is an upstream activator of mTORC1, which further integrates nutrient and energy inputs. To ensure a contextual coupling of cell division via Ras/MAPK-signalling and growth via mTORC1-signalling, feedback loops from one pathway back to the other are required. Here we describe a novel feedback from mTORC1, which oppositely affects oncogenic H-ras- and K-ras-signalling output, and as a consequence stemness properties of tumourigenic cells. Amino acid stimulation of mTORC1 increases the processed form of SREBP1, a major lipidome regulator. We show that modulation of the SREBP1 levels downstream of S6K1 has opposite effects on oncogenic H-ras and K-ras nanoscale membrane organisation, ensuing signalling output and promotion of mammospheres expressing these oncogenes. Our data suggest that modulation of phosphatidic acid, a major target of SREBP1 controlled lipid metabolism, is sufficient to affect H-ras and K-ras oppositely in the membrane. Thus mTORC1 activation increases H-ras-, but decreases K-ras-signalling output in cells transformed with the respective oncogene. Given the different impact of these two Ras isoforms on stemness, our results could have implications for stem cell biology and inhibition of cancer stem cells. [less ▲]

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See detailrapalogs can promote cancer cell stemness in vitro in a Galectin-1 and H-ras-dependent manner
Posada, IMD; Lectez, B; Sharma, M et al

in Oncotarget (2017), Vol. 8((No. 27)), 44550-44566

Currently several combination treatments of mTor- and Ras-pathway inhibitors are being tested in cancer therapy. While multiple feedback loops render these central signaling pathways robust, they ... [more ▼]

Currently several combination treatments of mTor- and Ras-pathway inhibitors are being tested in cancer therapy. While multiple feedback loops render these central signaling pathways robust, they complicate drug targeting. Here, we describe a novel H-ras specific feedback, which leads to an inadvertent rapalog induced activation of tumorigenicity in Ras transformed cells. We find that rapalogs specifically increase nanoscale clustering (nanoclustering) of oncogenic H-ras but not K-ras on the plasma membrane. This increases H-ras signaling output, promotes mammosphere numbers in a H-ras-dependent manner and tumor growth in ovo. Surprisingly, also other FKBP12 binders, but not mTor-inhibitors, robustly decrease FKBP12 levels after prolonged (>2 days) exposure. This leads to an upregulation of the nanocluster scaffold galectin-1 (Gal-1), which is responsible for the rapamycin-induced increase in H-ras nanoclustering and signaling output. We provide evidence that Gal-1 promotes stemness features in tumorigenic cells. Therefore, it may be necessary to block inadvertent induction of stemness traits in H-ras transformed cells by specific Gal-1 inhibitors that abrogate its effect on H-ras nanocluster. On a more general level, our findings may add an important mechanistic explanation to the pleiotropic physiological effects that are observed with rapalogs. [less ▲]

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See detailAlpha-synuclein gene variants may predict neurostimulation outcome.
Weiss, D.; Herrmann, S.; Wang, Lin UL et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2016)

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See detailLarge-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease
Wang, L.; Aasly, J. O.; Annesi, G. et al

in Neurology (2015), 85(15), 1283-92

OBJECTIVES: We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). METHODS: We invited ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). METHODS: We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. RESULTS: We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. [less ▲]

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See detailTREM2 R47H variant and risk of essential tremor: a cross-sectional international multicenter study
Ortega-Cubero, S.; Lorenzo-Betancor, O.; Lorenzo, E. et al

in Parkinsonism & related disorders (2015), 21(3), 306-309

INTRODUCTION: Essential tremor (ET) is the most frequent movement disorder in adults. Its pathophysiology is not clearly understood, however there is growing evidence showing common etiologic factors with ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Essential tremor (ET) is the most frequent movement disorder in adults. Its pathophysiology is not clearly understood, however there is growing evidence showing common etiologic factors with other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases (AD, PD). Recently, a rare p.R47H substitution (rs75932628) in the TREM2 protein (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2; OMIM: *605086) has been proposed as a risk factor for AD, PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the study was to determine whether TREM2 p.R47H allele is also a risk factor for developing ET. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter international study. An initial case-control cohort from Spain (n = 456 ET, n = 2715 controls) was genotyped. In a replication phase, a case-control series (n = 897 ET, n = 1449 controls) from different populations (Italy, Germany, North-America and Taiwan) was studied. Owed to the rarity of the variant, published results on p.R47H allele frequency from 14777 healthy controls from European, North American or Chinese descent were additionally considered. The main outcome measure was p.R47H (rs75932628) allelic frequency. RESULTS: There was a significant association between TREM2 p.R47H variant and ET in the Spanish cohort (odds ratio [OR], 5.97; 95% CI, 1.203-29.626; p = 0.042), but it was not replicated in other populations. CONCLUSIONS: These results argue in favor of population-specific differences in the allelic distribution and suggest that p.R47H (rs75932628) variant may contribute to the susceptibility of ET in Spanish population. However, taking into account the very low frequency of p.R47H, further confirmatory analyses of larger ET series are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of alpha-synuclein gene multiplications in early-onset Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.
Hofer, A.; Berg, D.; Asmus, F. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2005), 112(9), 1249-54

BACKGROUND: A triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene was found to cause autosomal dominant Lewy body disease in two distinct families. METHOD: We searched for alterations of alpha-synuclein gene dosage ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene was found to cause autosomal dominant Lewy body disease in two distinct families. METHOD: We searched for alterations of alpha-synuclein gene dosage and analysed the entire coding region for point mutations in 54 dementia with Lewy body disease (DLB) and in 103 young onset Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from Central Europe. RESULTS: We could not detect any quantitative alterations in the gene dosage of alpha-synuclein. Mutational screening of the entire coding region of alpha-synuclein revealed only one silent mutation V3V (adenine9guanine) in one case. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, this phenomenon appears not to be a major cause in the pathogenesis of sporadic DLB and young onset PD in this European population. [less ▲]

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