References of "Sen, Koushik"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelecting Fault Revealing Mutants
Titcheu Chekam, Thierry UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 249 (33 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLGV: Boosting Adversarial Example Transferability from Large Geometric Vicinity
Gubri, Martin UL; Cordy, Maxime UL; Papadakis, Mike UL et al

in Computer Vision -- ECCV 2022 (2022)

We propose transferability from Large Geometric Vicinity (LGV), a new technique to increase the transferability of black-box adversarial attacks. LGV starts from a pretrained surrogate model and collects ... [more ▼]

We propose transferability from Large Geometric Vicinity (LGV), a new technique to increase the transferability of black-box adversarial attacks. LGV starts from a pretrained surrogate model and collects multiple weight sets from a few additional training epochs with a constant and high learning rate. LGV exploits two geometric properties that we relate to transferability. First, models that belong to a wider weight optimum are better surrogates. Second, we identify a subspace able to generate an effective surrogate ensemble among this wider optimum. Through extensive experiments, we show that LGV alone outperforms all (combinations of) four established test-time transformations by 1.8 to 59.9\% points. Our findings shed new light on the importance of the geometry of the weight space to explain the transferability of adversarial examples. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficient and Transferable Adversarial Examples from Bayesian Neural Networks
Gubri, Martin UL; Cordy, Maxime UL; Papadakis, Mike UL et al

in The 38th Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (2022)

An established way to improve the transferability of black-box evasion attacks is to craft the adversarial examples on an ensemble-based surrogate to increase diversity. We argue that transferability is ... [more ▼]

An established way to improve the transferability of black-box evasion attacks is to craft the adversarial examples on an ensemble-based surrogate to increase diversity. We argue that transferability is fundamentally related to uncertainty. Based on a state-of-the-art Bayesian Deep Learning technique, we propose a new method to efficiently build a surrogate by sampling approximately from the posterior distribution of neural network weights, which represents the belief about the value of each parameter. Our extensive experiments on ImageNet, CIFAR-10 and MNIST show that our approach improves the success rates of four state-of-the-art attacks significantly (up to 83.2 percentage points), in both intra-architecture and inter-architecture transferability. On ImageNet, our approach can reach 94% of success rate while reducing training computations from 11.6 to 2.4 exaflops, compared to an ensemble of independently trained DNNs. Our vanilla surrogate achieves 87.5% of the time higher transferability than three test-time techniques designed for this purpose. Our work demonstrates that the way to train a surrogate has been overlooked, although it is an important element of transfer-based attacks. We are, therefore, the first to review the effectiveness of several training methods in increasing transferability. We provide new directions to better understand the transferability phenomenon and offer a simple but strong baseline for future work. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelecting fault revealing mutants
Titcheu Chekam, Thierry UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 149 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelecting fault revealing mutants
Titcheu Chekam, Thierry UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (2019)

Mutant selection refers to the problem of choosing, among a large number of mutants, the (few) ones that should be used by the testers. In view of this, we investigate the problem of selecting the fault ... [more ▼]

Mutant selection refers to the problem of choosing, among a large number of mutants, the (few) ones that should be used by the testers. In view of this, we investigate the problem of selecting the fault revealing mutants, i.e., the mutants that are killable and lead to test cases that uncover unknown program faults. We formulate two variants of this problem: the fault revealing mutant selection and the fault revealing mutant prioritization. We argue and show that these problems can be tackled through a set of ‘static’ program features and propose a machine learning approach, named FaRM, that learns to select and rank killable and fault revealing mutants. Experimental results involving 1,692 real faults show the practical benefits of our approach in both examined problems. Our results show that FaRM achieves a good trade-off between application cost and effectiveness (measured in terms of faults revealed). We also show that FaRM outperforms all the existing mutant selection methods, i.e., the random mutant sampling, the selective mutation and defect prediction (mutating the code areas pointed by defect prediction). In particular, our results show that with respect to mutant selection, our approach reveals 23% to 34% more faults than any of the baseline methods, while, with respect to mutant prioritization, it achieves higher average percentage of revealed faults with a median difference between 4% and 9% (from the random mutant orderings). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSemantic Fuzzing with Zest
Padhye, Rohan; Lemieux, Caroline; Sen, Koushik et al

in ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (3 UL)