References of "Schupbach, Michael"
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See detailGenetic stratification of motor and QoL outcomes in Parkinson's disease in the EARLYSTIM study
Weiss, Daniel; Landoulsi, Zied UL; May, Patrick UL et al

in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders (2022)

Purpose The decision for subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on clinical predictors. Whether genetic variables could predict favourable or unfavourable ... [more ▼]

Purpose The decision for subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on clinical predictors. Whether genetic variables could predict favourable or unfavourable decisions is under investigation. Objective First, we aimed to reproduce the previous observation that SNCA rs356220 was associated with favourable STN-DBS motor response. In additional exploratory analyses, we studied if other PD risk and progression variants from the latest GWAS are associated with therapeutic outcome. Further, we evaluated the predictive value of polygenic risk scores. Methods We comprehensively genotyped patients from the EarlyStim cohort using NeuroChip, and assessed the clinico-genetic associations with longitudinal outcome parameters. Results The SNCA rs356220 variant did not predict UPDRS III outcomes. However, it was associated with quality of life improvement in secondary analyses. Several polymorphisms from previously identified GWAS hits predicted motor or quality of life outcomes in DBS patients. Polygenic risk scores did not predict any outcome parameter. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that different common genetic markers are associated with favourable quality of life outcomes of STN-DBS in PD. These findings can be the basis for further validation in larger and independent cohorts. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioural outcomes of subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy versus medical therapy alone for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications (EARLYSTIM trial): secondary analysis of an open-label randomised trial.
Lhommee, Eugenie; Wojtecki, Lars; Czernecki, Virginie et al

in The Lancet. Neurology (2018), 17(3), 223-231

BACKGROUND: Although subthalamic stimulation is a recognised treatment for motor complications in Parkinson's disease, reports on behavioural outcomes are controversial, which represents a major challenge ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although subthalamic stimulation is a recognised treatment for motor complications in Parkinson's disease, reports on behavioural outcomes are controversial, which represents a major challenge when counselling candidates for subthalamic stimulation. We aimed to assess changes in behaviour in patients with Parkinson's disease receiving combined treatment with subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy over a 2-year follow-up period as compared with the behavioural evolution under medical therapy alone. METHODS: We did a parallel, open-label study (EARLYSTIM) at 17 surgical centres in France (n=8) and Germany (n=9). We recruited patients with Parkinson's disease who were disabled by early motor complications. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to either medical therapy alone or bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. The primary outcome was mean change in quality of life from baseline to 2 years. A secondary analysis was also done to assess behavioural outcomes. We used the Ardouin Scale of Behavior in Parkinson's Disease to assess changes in behaviour between baseline and 2-year follow-up. Apathy was also measured using the Starkstein Apathy Scale, and depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. The secondary analysis was done in all patients recruited. We used a generalised estimating equations (GEE) regression model for individual items and mixed model regression for subscores of the Ardouin scale and the apathy and depression scales. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00354133. The primary analysis has been reported elsewhere; this report presents the secondary analysis only. FINDINGS: Between July, 2006, and November, 2009, 251 participants were recruited, of whom 127 were allocated medical therapy alone and 124 were assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. At 2-year follow-up, the levodopa-equivalent dose was reduced by 39% (-363.3 mg/day [SE 41.8]) in individuals allocated bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy and was increased by 21% (245.8 mg/day [40.4]) in those assigned medical therapy alone (p<0.0001). Neuropsychiatric fluctuations decreased with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy during 2-year follow-up (mean change -0.65 points [SE 0.15]) and did not change with medical therapy alone (-0.02 points [0.15]); the between-group difference in change from baseline was significant (p=0.0028). At 2 years, the Ardouin scale subscore for hyperdopaminergic behavioural disorders had decreased with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy (mean change -1.26 points [SE 0.35]) and had increased with medical therapy alone (1.12 points [0.35]); the between-group difference was significant (p<0.0001). Mean change from baseline at 2 years in the Ardouin scale subscore for hypodopaminergic behavioural disorders, the Starkstein Apathy Scale score, and the Beck Depression Inventory score did not differ between treatment groups. Antidepressants were stopped in 12 patients assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy versus four patients allocated medical therapy alone. Neuroleptics were started in nine patients assigned medical therapy alone versus one patient allocated bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. During the 2-year follow-up, two individuals assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy and one patient allocated medical therapy alone died by suicide. INTERPRETATION: In a large cohort with Parkinson's disease and early motor complications, better overall behavioural outcomes were noted with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy compared with medical therapy alone. The presence of hyperdopaminergic behaviours and neuropsychiatric fluctuations can be judged additional arguments in favour of subthalamic stimulation if surgery is considered for disabling motor complications. FUNDING: German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, French Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique National, and Medtronic. [less ▲]

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See detailA new rechargeable device for deep brain stimulation: a prospective patient satisfaction survey.
Timmermann, Lars; Schupbach, Michael; Hertel, Frank UL et al

in European Neurology (2013), 69(4), 193-9

BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly successful in treating Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). Until recently implantable neurostimulators were nonrechargeable ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly successful in treating Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). Until recently implantable neurostimulators were nonrechargeable, battery-driven devices, with a lifetime of about 3-5 years. This relatively short duration causes problems for patients (e.g. programming and device-use limitations, unpredictable expiration, surgeries to replace depleted batteries). Additionally, these batteries (relatively large with considerable weight) may cause discomfort. To overcome these issues, the first rechargeable DBS device was introduced: smaller, lighter and intended to function for 9 years. METHODS: Of 35 patients implanted with the rechargeable device, 21 (including 8 PD, 10 dystonia, 2 ET) were followed before and 3 months after surgery and completed a systematic survey of satisfaction with the rechargeable device. RESULTS: Overall patient satisfaction was high (83.3 +/- 18.3). Dystonia patients tended to have lower satisfaction values for fit and comfort of the system than PD patients. Age was significantly negatively correlated with satisfaction regarding process of battery recharging. CONCLUSIONS: Dystonia patients (generally high-energy consumption, severe problems at the DBS device end-of-life) are good, reliable candidates for a rechargeable DBS system. In PD, younger patients, without signs of dementia and good technical understanding, might have highest benefit. [less ▲]

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