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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Édition 2018
Georges, Carrie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2018)

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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Editioun 2018
Georges, Carrie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2018)

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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Editioun 2017: Méisproochegkeet
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2017)

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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Éditioun 2017: Multilinguisme
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2017)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailCardinal and ordinal processing in spatial neglect
Sosson, Charlotte UL; di Luca, Samuel UL; Guillaume, Mathieu UL et al

Poster (2016, January)

Patients with spatial neglect do not only have difficulties in orienting attention in physical space but also in representational space, especially with respect to the mental representation of numbers ... [more ▼]

Patients with spatial neglect do not only have difficulties in orienting attention in physical space but also in representational space, especially with respect to the mental representation of numbers. Indeed, in a study by Zorzi et al. (2012) neglect patients were particularly slow when asked to compare the number 4 to the standard number 5, suggesting difficulties to process numbers on the left side of an internal standard. This difficulty was observed in a magnitude judgement, but not in a parity task, implying a dissociation between explicit and implicit processing of numerical magnitude. The present study aimed at replicating these findings and extending them to non-numerical sequences in order to complement the data obtained on bisection tasks (Zamarian, et al., 2007). Sixteen right-sided brain damaged patients with neglect (N+ =6; 4 females; all right handers; mean age: 55 +/- 8,7) and without neglect (N- =10; 2 females; all right hander; mean age: 48 +/- 6.2) participated in the study. They were administered the following tasks: a magnitude and a parity judgement task; an ordinal judgement task on numbers and on letters and a consonant/vowel classification task. For each task and each patient, a linear regression was computed in which the difference between the response times for the left effector (index finger) and the right effector (middle finger) was predicted by number magnitude. A negative slope will indicate the presence of a SNARC-like effect. We compared the negative slopes of the two patient groups using a Chi-square. Considering the proportion of SNARC-like effects, it appeared that, on one hand, N+ patients showed fewer SNARC-like effects than N- patients during magnitude judgements on numbers. Thus confirming the findings by Zorzi et al. (2012). On the other hand, N+ patients behaved similarly to N- patients for the parity judgements on numbers and for the order judgements both on numbers and letters. This last result suggest a dissociation between the spatial representation of magnitude and of order in N+ patients. These results point towards a specific impairment in explicit access to number magnitude in spatial hemineglect. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes body motion influence arithmetic problem solving
Sosson, Charlotte UL; Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Schuller, Anne-Marie UL et al

Poster (2015, September)

Recent evidence indicates that body movements can influence number processing (Hartmann, et al., 2012) and arithmetic problem solving (Lugli, et al., 2013). Thus it was for instance observed that moving ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence indicates that body movements can influence number processing (Hartmann, et al., 2012) and arithmetic problem solving (Lugli, et al., 2013). Thus it was for instance observed that moving the arm rightward and upward led to better performance during additions and leftward and downward during subtractions (Wiemers, et al., 2014). These results could be explained by the fact that left/right body motion can be (in)compatible with the attentional motion towards the left/right on the mental number line known to underlie subtractions/additions (i.e. operational momentum effect) (McCrink, et al., 2007; Lindemann, et al., 2011). The compatible situations (i.e. leftwards motion - subtraction and rightwards motion - addition) thus are expected to facilitate arithmetic performance compared to incompatible ones. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis during arithmetic problem solving using: (1) physical passive rotary whole-body motion and (2) virtual environment mimicking a similar passive body motion. Findings of the present study confirm the classical effects known to play a role in arithmetic problem solving. They also revealed that passive rotary whole-body motion - implemented physically or by virtual reality - had no particular effect on the solving of calculations. This is in contrast with previous studies that showed an influence of active head/arm or passive translational movements on numerical task performance. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes body motion influence arithmetic
Sosson, Charlotte UL; Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Schuller, Anne-Marie UL et al

Poster (2015, March)

« Embodiment theory » proposes that bodily actions impact the quality of mental representations. Two recent studies (Loetscher, et al., 2008; Hartmann, et al., 2011) have shown that leftward movements of ... [more ▼]

« Embodiment theory » proposes that bodily actions impact the quality of mental representations. Two recent studies (Loetscher, et al., 2008; Hartmann, et al., 2011) have shown that leftward movements of the head or the body enhanced small number generation while rightward movements increased the generation of larger numbers. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of passive whole-body movement on arithmetic-problem solving. Our design was elaborated in the context of operational momentum effect (Pinhas, & Fischer, 2008; McCrink, et al., 2007). In the domain of arithmetic this effect refers to the fact that outcomes of additions are systematically estimated to be larger than the outcomes of subtractions and vice versa for subtraction (Knops, et al., 2009; Lindemann, et al., 2011). Interestingly this bias is present for non-carry but not for carry problems. To account for the operational momentum effect it has been proposed that subtractions involve an attentional motion towards the left of the mental number line and additions towards the right inducing the above-mentioned under- and over-estimation. In line with these findings we reasoned that passive body motion might orient attention towards the side of the body movement and consequently enhance the attentional shifts supposed to underlie the operational momentum effects that occur during numerical tasks. In the present paradigm participants were sitting blindfolded on a swivel chair. While they were rotated alternatively 180° towards the left and the right with a pace of 49°/sec., they were asked to orally solve different kinds of calculations presented via headphones. Calculations consisted in additions and subtractions (first operand: from 1 to 98; second operand: from 1 to 13 and results: from 3 to 89) that were composed of carry and non-carry problems and had different levels of difficulty (easy: results from 1 to 9; medium: results from 11 to 19; difficult: from 21 to 89). Contrary to our predictions, results indicate that the direction of passive body motion (i.e. leftwards vs. rightwards) did not influence arithmetic performance. Indeed the ANOVA for repeated measures with the factor Motion (left, right), Problem type (carry, non-carry) and Operation type (addition, subtraction) revealed no main effect of motion (F(1,33)= 0,856, p=0.361). In contrast we observed a main effect of Problem type (F(1,33)=29.065, p<0.001), a main effect of Operation type (F(1,33)= 20,721, p<0.001) and a significant interaction of Problem type x Operation type (F(1,30)=5.605,p=0.024). As would be expected from the results observed with classical stationary experiment settings, participants were more accurate while solving additions than subtractions and made less errors with non-carry problems. Moreover the carry effect was larger for subtractions than additions. Analyses of the reaction times led to the same conclusions. These results indicate that orally solving arithmetic problems is not influenced by the direction (leftwards vs. rightwards) of passive rotary body-motion. This finding contrasts with previous observations that active head movements and/or passive translational movements impacts numerical task performance. Future studies which systematically contrast the effects of the different movement types on numerical tasks should help to clarify this discrepancy. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of return and attentional facilitation: Numbers can be counted in, letters tell a different story.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valerie; Schuller, Anne-Marie UL et al

in Acta psychologica (2015), 163

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield ... [more ▼]

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield depending on the digit's magnitude, thus facilitating target detection in the cued hemifield (left/right hemifield after small/large digits, respectively). Studies using other types of behaviourally or biologically relevant central cues known to elicit automated symbolic attention orienting effects such as arrows or gaze have shown that the initial facilitation of cued target detection can turn into inhibition at longer stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). However, no studies so far investigated whether inhibition of return (IOR) is also observed using digits as uninformative central cues. To address this issue we designed an attentional cueing paradigm using SOAs ranging from 500ms to 1650ms. As expected, the results showed a facilitation effect at the relatively short 650ms SOA, replicating previous findings. At the long 1650ms SOA, however, participants were faster to detect targets in the uncued hemifield compared to the cued hemifield, showing an IOR effect. A control experiment with letters showed no such congruency effects at any SOA. These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming that Arabic digits engage automated symbolic orienting of attention. [less ▲]

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See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie et al

in Journal of cognitive pychology (2014)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as eventrelated potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of body motion on random number generation
Sosson, Charlotte UL; Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL et al

Poster (2014)

Knowledge and thinking are constrained by sensory-motor processes. This increasingly influential view has been termed the “embodiment theory” and proposes that bodily actions directly impact the quality ... [more ▼]

Knowledge and thinking are constrained by sensory-motor processes. This increasingly influential view has been termed the “embodiment theory” and proposes that bodily actions directly impact the quality of mental representations. The present study specifically aimed to investigate the influence of passive whole-body movement on numerical cognition. Two recent studies (Loetscher, et al., 2008; Hartmann, et al. 2011) indeed indicate that head or body movements can induce a shift of the attention on the mental number line. More precisely, leftward movements seemed to enhance small number generation while rightward movements led to larger number generation. The current study investigated this effect by using a non-motorized rotating chair. Concretely, while seated, participants were cyclically rotated 40 times for a movement amplitude of 90° from left to right and vice versa at an average frequency of 0.3 Hz. During each 90° movement segment they had to randomly produce numbers ranging between 1 and 30, but for methodological reasons the six extreme numbers were excluded from the analysis. The results indicate that the average number produced during leftward movement was smaller than the average number produced during rightward movement. These findings confirm the impact of passive whole-body movement on the production of numerical stimuli, indicating that rotation-movements of the body can displace attention on the mental number line. [less ▲]

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See detailLEARN stellt sech fier
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (14 UL)
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See detailLEARN stellt sech fier
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2012, February 10)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as event-related potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature-discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011, April)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as event-related potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature-discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

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See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: electrophysiological evidence.
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (5 UL)