References of "Scholtes, Felix"
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See detailNeurologists, neurosurgeons, and psychiatrists' personality traits: a comparison
Surbeck, Werner; Samuel, Robin UL; Spieler, Derek et al

in Acta Neurochirurgica (2020)

Background: Clinicians in neuroscientific disciplines may present distinct personality profiles. Despite of potential relevance to clinical practice, this has not yet been studied. We therefore aimed to ... [more ▼]

Background: Clinicians in neuroscientific disciplines may present distinct personality profiles. Despite of potential relevance to clinical practice, this has not yet been studied. We therefore aimed to compare personality profiles of physicians working in the three main disciplines of clinical neuroscience, i.e., neurologists, neurosurgeons, and psychiatrists, between each other, across levels of training and to other specialties. Methods:An online survey using the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), an internationally validated measure of the five-factor model of personality dimensions, was distributed to board-certified physicians, residents, and medical students in several European countries and Canada. Differences in personality profiles were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance and canonical linear discriminant analysis on age- and sex-standardized z-scores of personality traits. Single personality traits were analyzed using robust t tests. Results: Of the 5148 respondents who completed the survey, 723 indicated the specialties neurology, neurosurgery, or psychiatry. Compared to all other specialties, personality profiles of training and trained physicians in these three main clinical neuroscience disciplines (“NN&P”) significantly differed, with significantly higher scores in openness to experience. Within NN&P, there were significant differences in personality profiles, driven by lower neuroticism in neurosurgeons, higher conscientiousness in neurosurgeons and neurologists, and higher agreeableness in psychiatrists. Across levels of training, NN&P personality profiles did not differ significantly. Conclusion: The distinct clinical neuroscience personality profile is characterized by higher levels of openness to experience compared to non-neuroscience specialties. Despite high variability within each discipline, moderate, but solid differences in the personality profiles of neurologists, neurosurgeons and psychiatrists exist. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferent but Similar: Personality Traits of Surgeons and Internists. Results of a Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Stienen, Martin N.; Scholtes, Felix; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in BMJ Open (2018), 8(e02131),

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified physicians. Design: Prospective, observational. Setting: Online survey containing the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), an internationally validated measure of the Five Factor Model of personality dimensions, distributed to board-certified physicians, residents and medical students in several European countries and Canada. Differences in personality profiles were analyzed using MANOVA and Canonical Linear Discriminant Analysis on age- and sex-standardized z-scores of the personality traits. Single personality traits were analyzed using robust t-tests. Participants: The TIPI was completed by 2345 board-certified physicians, 1453 residents and 1350 medical students, who also provided demographic information. Interventions: None. Results: Normal population and board-certified physicians’ personality profiles differed (P<0.001). The latter scored higher on conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, but lower on neuroticism (all P<0.001). There was no difference in openness to experience. Board-certified surgical and medical doctors’ personality profiles were also different (P<0.001). Surgeons scored higher on extraversion (P=0.003) and openness to experience (P=0.002), but lower on neuroticism (P<0.001). There was no difference in agreeableness and conscientiousness. These differences in personality profiles were reproduced at other levels of training, i.e., in students and training physicians engaging in surgical versus medical practice. Conclusion: These results indicate the existence of a distinct and consistent average “physician personality”. Despite high variability within disciplines, there are moderate, but solid and reproducible differences between surgical and medical specialties. [less ▲]

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