References of "Schierloh, Ulrike"
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See detailPsychological wellbeing of parents of very young children with type 1 diabetes – baseline assessment
De Beaufort, Carine; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Schierloh, Ulrike et al

in Frontiers in Endocrinology (2021), 12(721028),

Background: Type 1 diabetes in young children is a heavy parental burden. As part of pilot phase of the KIDSAP01 study, we conducted a baseline assessment in parents to study the association between ... [more ▼]

Background: Type 1 diabetes in young children is a heavy parental burden. As part of pilot phase of the KIDSAP01 study, we conducted a baseline assessment in parents to study the association between hypoglycemia fear, parental wellbeing and child behavior. Methods: All parents were invited to fill in baseline questionnaires: hypoglycemia fear survey (HFS), WHO-5, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results: 24 children (median age: 5-year, range 1-7 years, 63% male, mean diabetes duration: 3 ± 1.7 years) participated. 23/24 parents filled out the questionnaires. We found a higher score for the hypoglycemia fear behavior 33.9 ± 5.6 compared to hypoglycemia worry 34.6 ± 12.2. Median WHO-5 score was 16 (8 - 22) with poor well-being in two parents. Median daytime sleepiness score was high in five parents (>10). For six children a high total behavioral difficulty score (>16) was reported. Pro social behavior score was lower than normal in six children (<6). Parental well-being was negatively associated with HFS total (r = - 0.50, p <.05) and subscale scores (r = - 0.44, p <.05 for HFS-Worry and HFS-Behavior), child behavior (r = - 0.45, p = .05) and positively with child age (r = 0.58, p <.01). HFS, parental well-being nor daytime sleepiness are associated with the HbA1c. Conclusion: Regular screening of parental well-being, hypoglycemia fear and child behavior should be part of routine care to target early intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailLower plasma insulin levels during overnight closed loop in schoolchildren with type 1 diabetes: potential advantage?
Schierloh, Ulrike; Wilinska, M.; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2019), 14(3: e0212013), 1-11

Background Studies have shown that overnight closed-loop insulin delivery can improve glucose control and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and hence may improve metabolic outcomes and reduce burden for ... [more ▼]

Background Studies have shown that overnight closed-loop insulin delivery can improve glucose control and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and hence may improve metabolic outcomes and reduce burden for children with type 1 diabetes and their families. However, research so far has not reported insulin levels while comparing closed-loop to open-loop insulin delivery in children. Therefore, in this study we obtained glucose levels as well plasma insulin levels in children with type 1 diabetes to evaluate the efficacy of a model - based closed-loop algorithm compared to an open-loop administration. Methods Fifteen children with type 1 diabetes, 6-12 years, participated in this open-label single center study. We used a randomized cross over design in which we compared overnight closed-loop insulin delivery with sensor augmented pump therapy for two nights in both the hospital and at home (i.e., 1 night in-patient stay and at home per treatment condition). Only during the in-patient stay, hourly plasma insulin and blood glucose levels were assessed and are reported in this paper. Results Results of paired sample t-tests revealed that although plasma insulin levels were significantly lower during the closed-loop than in the open-loop (Mean difference 36.51 pmol/l; t(13)=2.13, p=.03, effect size d= 0.57), blood glucose levels did not vary between conditions (mean difference 0.76 mmol/l; t(13)=1.24, p=.12, d=0.37). The administered dose of insulin was significantly lower during the closed-loop compared with the open-loop (mean difference 0.10 UI; t(12)=2.45, p=.02, d=0.68). Conclusions Lower insulin doses were delivered in the closed-loop, resulting in lower plasma insulin levels , whereby glucose levels were not affected negatively. This suggests that the closed-loop administration is better targeted and hence could be more effective. [less ▲]

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See detailCan health indicators and psychosocial characteristics predict attrition in youth with overweight and obesity seeking ambulatory treatment? Data from a retrospective longitudinal study in a paediatric clinic in Luxembourg.
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Samouda, Hanen; Schierloh, Ulrike et al

in BMJ Open (2017), 7(9),

ABSTRACT Objectives: The current study aimed to identify factors that could predict attrition in youth starting ambulatory treatment to control or lose weight. Design: retrospective longitudinal study ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Objectives: The current study aimed to identify factors that could predict attrition in youth starting ambulatory treatment to control or lose weight. Design: retrospective longitudinal study Setting: paediatric clinic: ambulatory treatment program Patients and measures: A youth sample (N=191; 89 boys; age 7-17 years) completed measures of demographic characteristics, health and psychosocial traits before starting an ambulatory weight management program. Anthropometric and biological markers related to obesity were also obtained. Test of mean differences and regression analyses were used to investigate the relationship between these variables and attrition after one year. Results: Chi-square and t-test results showed both psychosocial and health indicators differentiated between participants who continued attending the treatment program and those that dropped out. More specifically, youth that dropped out of treatment were significantly older, had higher BMI-Z scores, higher levels of insulin, triglycerides and HOMA-IR, reported poorer health and more conduct problems, and were more dissatisfied with themselves and their bodies before starting treatment. Results of regression analyses revealed that weight status (anthropometric and biological markers), age and body dissatisfaction predict attrition (overall prediction success 73%; prediction success for continued attendance 90/91%; prediction success for dropout 42/44%). Conclusion: Attrition, but especially the continued attendance in treatment, can be successfully predicted by age, weight status and body dissatisfaction. For patients who present with one or more risk factors, careful consideration is needed to decide which (combination of) in- or outpatient program may facilitate prolonged engagement of the patient and hence may be most effective in establishing weight loss. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel GATA6 mutation in a child with congenital heart malformation and neonatal diabetes.
Eifes, Serge UL; Chudasama, Kishan K.; Molnes, Janne et al

in Clinical Case Reports (2013), 1(2), 86-90

Diabetes in neonates is a monogenetic disease and genetic analysis is warranted to allow best treatment, prognosis, and genetic counseling. Transcription factor mutations may have a variable expression ... [more ▼]

Diabetes in neonates is a monogenetic disease and genetic analysis is warranted to allow best treatment, prognosis, and genetic counseling. Transcription factor mutations may have a variable expression and different organs may be involved. [less ▲]

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