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See detailAnalysis of the dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish
Rodius, Sophie; Androsova, Ganna UL; Götz, Lou et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6

The zebrafish has the capacity to regenerate its heart after severe injury. While the function of a few genes during this process has been studied, we are far from fully understanding how genes interact ... [more ▼]

The zebrafish has the capacity to regenerate its heart after severe injury. While the function of a few genes during this process has been studied, we are far from fully understanding how genes interact to coordinate heart regeneration. To enable systematic insights into this phenomenon, we generated and integrated a dynamic co-expression network of heart regeneration in the zebrafish and linked systems-level properties to the underlying molecular events. Across multiple post-injury time points, the network displays topological attributes of biological relevance. We show that regeneration steps are mediated by modules of transcriptionally coordinated genes, and by genes acting as network hubs. We also established direct associations between hubs and validated drivers of heart regeneration with murine and human orthologs. The resulting models and interactive analysis tools are available at http://infused.vital-it.ch. Using a worked example, we demonstrate the usefulness of this unique open resource for hypothesis generation and in silico screening for genes involved in heart regeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailA comprehensive integrative analysis of the transcriptional network underlying the zebrafish heart regeneration
Androsova, Ganna UL; Rodius, Sophie; Nazarov, Petr et al

Poster (2014, September 08)

Despite a notable reduction in incidence of acute myocardial infarction (MI), patients who experienced it remain at risk for premature death and cardiac malfunction. The human cardiomyocytes are not able ... [more ▼]

Despite a notable reduction in incidence of acute myocardial infarction (MI), patients who experienced it remain at risk for premature death and cardiac malfunction. The human cardiomyocytes are not able to achieve extensive regeneration upon MI. Remarkably, the adult zebrafish is able to achieve complete heart regeneration following amputation, cryoinjury or genetic ablation. This raises new potential opportunities on how to boost heart healing capacity in humans. The objective of our research is to characterize the transcriptional network of the zebrafish heart regeneration and underlying regulatory mechanisms. To conduct our investigation, we used microarray data from zebrafish at 6 post-cryoinjury time points (4 hours, and 1, 3, 7, 14 and 90 days) and control samples. We thereon looked for the gene co-expression patterns in the data and, based on that, constructed a weighted gene co-expression network. To detect candidate functional sub-networks (modules), we used two different network clustering approaches: a density-based (ClusterONE) and a topological overlap-based (Hybrid Dynamic Branch Cut) algorithms. The visualization of the expression changes of the candidate modules reflected the dynamics of the recovery process. Also we aimed to identify candidate “hub” genes that might regulate the behavior of the biological modules and drive the regeneration process. We identified eighteen distinct modules associated with heart recovery upon cryoinjury. Functional enrichment analysis displayed that the modules are involved in different cellular processes crucial for heart regeneration, including: cell fate specification (p-value < 0.006) and migration (p-value < 0.047), ribosome biogenesis (p-value < 0.004), cardiac cell differentiation (p-value < 3E-04), and various signaling events (p-value < 0.037). The visualization of the modules’ expression profiles confirmed the relevance of these functional enrichments. For instance, the genes of the module involved in regulation of endodermal cell fate specification were up-regulated upon injury until 3 days. Among the candidate hub genes detected in the network, there are genes relevant to atherosclerosis treatment and inflammation during cardiac arrest. These and other findings are currently undergoing deeper computational analyses. The top promising targets will be independently validated using our zebrafish (in vivo) model. In conclusion, our findings provide insights into the complex regulatory mechanisms involved during heart regeneration in the zebrafish. These data will be useful for modelling specific network-based responses to heart injury, and for finding sensitive network points that may trigger or boost heart regeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailThe talin rod IBS2 alpha-helix interacts with the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail membrane-proximal helix by establishing charge complementary salt bridges.
Rodius, Sophie; Chaloin, Olivier; Moes, Michèle UL et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2008), 283(35), 24212-23

Talin establishes a major link between integrins and actin filaments and contains two distinct integrin binding sites: one, IBS1, located in the talin head domain and involved in integrin activation and a ... [more ▼]

Talin establishes a major link between integrins and actin filaments and contains two distinct integrin binding sites: one, IBS1, located in the talin head domain and involved in integrin activation and a second, IBS2, that maps to helix 50 of the talin rod domain and is essential for linking integrin beta subunits to the cytoskeleton ( Moes, M., Rodius, S., Coleman, S. J., Monkley, S. J., Goormaghtigh, E., Tremuth, L., Kox, C., van der Holst, P. P., Critchley, D. R., and Kieffer, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 17280-17288 ). Through the combined approach of mutational analysis of the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail and the talin rod IBS2 site, SPR binding studies, as well as site-specific antibody inhibition experiments, we provide evidence that the integrin beta3-talin rod interaction relies on a helix-helix association between alpha-helix 50 of the talin rod domain and the membrane-proximal alpha-helix of the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail. Moreover, charge complementarity between the highly conserved talin rod IBS2 lysine residues and integrin beta3 glutamic acid residues is necessary for this interaction. Our results support a model in which talin IBS2 binds to the same face of the beta3 subunit cytoplasmic helix as the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic tail helix, suggesting that IBS2 can only interact with the beta3 subunit following integrin activation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe integrin binding site 2 (IBS2) in the talin rod domain is essential for linking integrin beta subunits to the cytoskeleton.
Moes, Michèle UL; Rodius, Sophie; Coleman, Stacey J. et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2007), 282(23), 17280-8

Talin1 is a large cytoskeletal protein that links integrins to actin filaments through two distinct integrin binding sites, one present in the talin head domain (IBS1) necessary for integrin activation ... [more ▼]

Talin1 is a large cytoskeletal protein that links integrins to actin filaments through two distinct integrin binding sites, one present in the talin head domain (IBS1) necessary for integrin activation and a second (IBS2) that we have previously mapped to talin residues 1984-2113 (fragment J) of the talin rod domain (1 Tremuth, L., Kreis, S., Melchior, C., Hoebeke, J., Ronde, P., Plancon, S., Takeda, K., and Kieffer, N. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 22258-22266), but whose functional role is still elusive. Using a bioinformatics and cell biology approach, we have determined the minimal structure of IBS2 and show that this integrin binding site corresponds to 23 residues located in alpha helix 50 of the talin rod domain (residues 2077-2099). Alanine mutation of 2 highly conserved residues (L2094A/I2095A) within this alpha helix, which disrupted the alpha-helical structure of IBS2 as demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and limited trypsin proteolysis, was sufficient to prevent in vivo talin fragment J targeting to alphaIIbbeta3 integrin in focal adhesions and to inhibit in vitro this association as shown by an alphaIIbbeta3 pulldown assay. Moreover, expression of a full-length mouse green fluorescent protein-talin LI/AA mutant in mouse talin1(-/-) cells was unable to rescue the inability of these cells to assemble focal adhesions (in contrast to green fluorescent protein-talin wild type) despite the presence of IBS1. Our data provide the first direct evidence that IBS2 in the talin rod is essential to link integrins to the cytoskeleton. [less ▲]

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