References of "Rieger, Alexander 50040042"
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See detailDeFi, Not So Decentralized: The Measured Distribution of Voting Rights
Barbereau, Tom Josua UL; Smethurst, Reilly UL; Papageorgiou, Orestis UL et al

in Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2022 (2022, January)

Bitcoin and Ethereum are frequently promoted as decentralized, but developers and academics question their actual decentralization. This motivates further experiments with public permissionless ... [more ▼]

Bitcoin and Ethereum are frequently promoted as decentralized, but developers and academics question their actual decentralization. This motivates further experiments with public permissionless blockchains to achieve decentralization along technical, economic, and political lines. The distribution of tokenized voting rights aims for political decentralization. Tokenized voting rights achieved notoriety within the nascent field of decentralized finance (DeFi) in 2020. As an alternative to centralized crypto-asset exchanges and lending platforms (owned by companies like Coinbase and Celsius), DeFi developers typically create non-custodial projects that are not majority-owned or managed by legal entities. Holders of tokenized voting rights can instead govern DeFi projects. To scrutinize DeFi’s distributed governance strategies, we conducted a multiple-case study of non-custodial, Ethereum-based DeFi projects: Uniswap, Maker, SushiSwap, Yearn Finance, and UMA. Our findings are novel and surprising: quantitative evaluations of DeFi’s distributed governance strategies reveal a failure to achieve political decentralization. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Social Construction of Self-Sovereign Identity: An Extended Model of Interpretive Flexibility
Weigl, Linda UL; Barbereau, Tom Josua UL; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2022 (2022, January)

User-centric identity management systems are gaining momentum as concerns about Big Tech and Big Government rise. Many of these systems are framed as offering Self-Sovereign Identity (SSI). Yet, competing ... [more ▼]

User-centric identity management systems are gaining momentum as concerns about Big Tech and Big Government rise. Many of these systems are framed as offering Self-Sovereign Identity (SSI). Yet, competing appropriation and the social embedding of SSI have resulted in diverging interpretations. These vague and value-laden interpretations can damage the public discourse and risk misrepresenting values and affordances that technology offers to users. To unpack the various social and technical understandings of SSI, we adopt an ‘interpretive flexibility’ lens. Based on a qualitative inductive interview study, we find that SSI’s interpretation is strongly mediated by surrounding institutional properties. Our study helps to better navigate these different perceptions and highlights the need for a multidimensional framework that can improve the understanding of complex socio-technical systems for digital government practitioners, researchers, and policy-makers. [less ▲]

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See detailWith or Without Blockchain? Towards a Decentralized, SSI-based eRoaming Architecture
Höß, Alexandra UL; Roth, Tamara UL; Sedlmeir, Johannes UL et al

in Proceedings of the 55th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) (2022)

Fragmentation and limited accessibility of charging infrastructure impede the adoption of electric vehicles. To improve the availability of charging infrastructure independent of providers, eRoaming ... [more ▼]

Fragmentation and limited accessibility of charging infrastructure impede the adoption of electric vehicles. To improve the availability of charging infrastructure independent of providers, eRoaming offers a promising solution. Yet, current eRoaming systems are typically centralized, which raises concerns of market power concentration. While the use of blockchain technology can obviate such concerns, it comes with significant privacy challenges. To address these challenges, we explore a combination of blockchain with self-sovereign identity. Specifically, we apply a design science research approach, which helps us to identify requirements, derive a conceptual architecture, and deduce design principles for decentralized eRoaming and beyond. We find that blockchain may best leverage its benefits when it takes a backseat as a public registry for legal entities. Moreover, we find that the use of self-sovereign identities could improve compliance with privacy regulations, but they should not be overused. [less ▲]

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See detailNot yet another digital identity
Rieger, Alexander UL; Roth, Tamara UL; Sedlmeir, Johannes UL et al

in Nature Human Behaviour (2021)

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See detailDigital Identities and Verifiable Credentials
Sedlmeir, Johannes UL; Smethurst, Reilly UL; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in Business and Information Systems Engineering (2021), 63(5), 603-613

Public institutions and companies typically employ physical credentials (such as passports, social security cards, and employee badges) to identify individuals. Individuals can choose where to store their ... [more ▼]

Public institutions and companies typically employ physical credentials (such as passports, social security cards, and employee badges) to identify individuals. Individuals can choose where to store their physical credentials, and sometimes, they can decide to whom their credentials are disclosed. These familiar privileges inspired a new type of digital credential called a verifiable credential (VC). Similar to physical credentials, individuals can store their verifiable credentials in a so-called digital wallet on their mobile phone, on another edge device, or in the cloud, and they can use verifiable credentials for identification, authentication, and authorization. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Evolution of an Architectural Paradigm - Using Blockchain to Build a Cross-Organizational Enterprise Service Bus
Amend, Julia; Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), Maui, Hawaii (Virtual) (2021, April)

Cross-organizational collaboration and the exchange of process data are indispensable for many processes in federally organized governments. Conventional IT solutions, such as cross-organizational ... [more ▼]

Cross-organizational collaboration and the exchange of process data are indispensable for many processes in federally organized governments. Conventional IT solutions, such as cross-organizational workflow management systems, address these requirements through centralized process management and architectures. However, such centralization is difficult and often undesirable in federal contexts. One alternative solution that emphasizes decentralized process management and a decentralized architecture is the blockchain solution of Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. Here, we investigate the architecture of this solution and examine how it addresses the requirements of federal contexts. We find that the solution’s architecture resembles an improvement and cross-organizational adaption of an old architectural paradigm, the enterprise service bus. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Blockchain to Coordinate Federal Processes: The Case of Germany's Federal Office for Migration and Refugees
Amend, Julia; van Dun, Christopher; Fridgen, Gilbert UL et al

in Urbach, Nils; Röglinger, Maximilian; Kautz, Karlheinz (Eds.) et al Digitalization Cases Vol. 2: Mastering Digital Transformation for Global Business (2021)

(a)Situation faced: The German asylum procedure requires close cooperation and information exchange between various authorities at the municipal, state, and federal levels. Federal separation of ... [more ▼]

(a)Situation faced: The German asylum procedure requires close cooperation and information exchange between various authorities at the municipal, state, and federal levels. Federal separation of competencies inhibits the delegation of process governance to a central authority such as the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF). This separation also leads to regional differences as federal laws govern the procedure's general steps, whereas state laws govern implementation. Moreover, existing solutions for cross-organizational collaboration are limited in terms of flexibility, security, and data quality. As a result, the exchange of certain data on asylum procedures still occurs using Excel spreadsheets and e-mails.(b)Action taken: Against this backdrop, the BAMF explored technological options that would support the decentralized governance of the asylum procedure. After a preliminary evaluation, the BAMF decided to explore a solution based on blockchain technology. Building upon a successful proof of concept, the BAMF initiated a pilot project with Saxony's central immigration authority. This project aims to develop a blockchain solution that supports the coordination of asylum procedures and can be easily adapted to local differences and functional requirements.(c)Results achieved: The use of the blockchain solution allows for efficient, secure, and timely distribution of status information. It supports communication and improves coordination between authorities. Despite an apparent conflict between blockchain principles and data privacy requirements, the BAMF's design complies with relevant regulation (notably the GDPR). As a first-of-its-kind project, it outlines best practices and provides valuable insights into opportunities and challenges arising from the use of blockchain in the public sector.(d)Lessons learned: The BAMF's case demonstrates that blockchain solutions can be promising alternatives when the delegation of process governance to a central party is not desirable and when federal principles of organization are to be reflected technologically. However, blockchain projects require special attention to managing know-how and capabilities, software development activities, stakeholders, the regulatory context, and cross-organizational governance. [less ▲]

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See detailReconciling Blockchain with the GDPR: Insights from the German Asylum Procedure
Rieger, Alexander UL; Stohr, Alexander; Wenninger, Annette et al

in Blockchain and the Public Sector: Theories, Reforms, and Case Studies (2021)

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See detailThe Blockchain Effect: From Inter-Ecosystem to Intra-Ecosystem Competition
Höß, Alexandra UL; Schlatt, Vincent; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in Proceedings of the Twenty-Ninth European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS) (2021)

Blockchains enable distributed operation, decentralized control, and token-based representations of tangible and intangible assets. Organizations commonly use blockchain technology to foster collaboration ... [more ▼]

Blockchains enable distributed operation, decentralized control, and token-based representations of tangible and intangible assets. Organizations commonly use blockchain technology to foster collaboration. In this paper, we investigate the use of blockchain to foster competition. We conduct a single-case study of Germany’s mobility-as-a-service community and its efforts to use blockchain as a technical backbone for mobility ecosystems. The community views blockchain as a technology that embodies organizing principles of empowerment and equality. These principles motivated the community to rethink ecosystem structure. In particular, the community began to question the exclusive, non-adversarial position of mobility service aggregators. We find that rethinking this position might shift their competitive focus from the inter- to the intra-ecosystem level and enables the creation of a larger ecosystem. As a second-order effect, the community began to rethink ecosystem governance. Specifically, it began to explore options for effectively distributed decision making while safeguarding efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailBusiness Models and Profitability of Energy Storage
Baumgarte, Felix; Glenk, Gunther; Rieger, Alexander UL

in iScience (2020), 23(10),

Rapid growth of intermittent renewable power generation makes the identification of investment opportunities in energy storage and the establishment of their profitability indispensable. Here we first ... [more ▼]

Rapid growth of intermittent renewable power generation makes the identification of investment opportunities in energy storage and the establishment of their profitability indispensable. Here we first present a conceptual framework to characterize business models of energy storage and systematically differentiate investment opportunities. We then use the framework to examine which storage technologies can perform the identified business models and review the recent literature regarding the profitability of individual combinations of business models and technologies. Our analysis shows that a set of commercially available technologies can serve all identified business models. We also find that certain combinations appear to have approached a tipping point toward profitability. Yet, this conclusion only holds for combinations examined most recently or stacking several business models. Many technologically feasible combinations have been neglected, indicating a need for further research to provide a detailed and conclusive understanding about the profitability of energy storage. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to Develop a GDPR-Compliant Blockchain Solution for Cross-Organizational Workflow Management: Evidence from the German Asylum Procedure.
Guggenmos, Florian; Lockl, Jannik; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2020 (2020)

Blockchain technology has the potential to resolve trust concerns in cross-organizational workflows and to reduce reliance on paper-based documents as trust anchors. Although these prospects are real, so ... [more ▼]

Blockchain technology has the potential to resolve trust concerns in cross-organizational workflows and to reduce reliance on paper-based documents as trust anchors. Although these prospects are real, so is regulatory uncertainty. In particular, the reconciliation of blockchain with Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is proving to be a significant challenge. We tackled this challenge with the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. Here, we explain how we used Action Research to guide the Federal Office in creating a GDPR-compliant blockchain solution for the German asylum procedure. Moreover, we explain the architecture of the Federal Office’s solution and present two design principles for developing GDPR- compliant blockchain solutions for cross- organizational workflow management. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding a Blockchain Application that Complies with the EU General Data Protection Regulation
Rieger, Alexander UL; Guggenmos, Florian; Lockl, Jannik et al

in MIS Quarterly Executive (2019), 18(4), 263--279

Complying with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) poses significant challenges for blockchain projects, including establishing clear responsibilities for compliance, securing lawful bases ... [more ▼]

Complying with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) poses significant challenges for blockchain projects, including establishing clear responsibilities for compliance, securing lawful bases for processing personal data, and observing rights to rectification and erasure. We describe how Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees addressed these challenges and created a GDPR-compliant blockchain solution for cross-organizational workflow coordination. Based on the lessons learned, we provide three recommendations for ensuring blockchain solutions are GDPR-compliant. [less ▲]

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See detailSupporting communication and cooperation in the asylum procedure with Blockchain technology : A proof of concept by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Guggenmos, Florian; Lockl, Jannik et al

Report (2019)

The proof of concept showed that the use of Blockchain technology could support cross-organisational communication and cooperation in the asylum procedure. In addition, Blockchain could provide an ... [more ▼]

The proof of concept showed that the use of Blockchain technology could support cross-organisational communication and cooperation in the asylum procedure. In addition, Blockchain could provide an important foundation for the establishment of digital identities and allow an asylum seeker’s procedure to be tracked based on this identity. Admittedly, not all applicable data protection regulations were fully implemented in the proof of concept. However, the findings gained as part of the project provide a promising basis for the development of a Blockchain-based solution for the asylum procedure that complies with data protection requirements. Moreover, the developed concept could scale beyond Germany’s borders. Blockchain-based, transnational management of asylum procedures could therefore become a joint project of the European member states to strengthen cooperation while safeguarding federal structures. This means that Blockchain technology could be the start of digital federalism in Europe (including the asylum procedure). [less ▲]

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See detailBlockchain in der öffentlichen Verwaltung - Unterstützung der Zusammenarbeit im Asylprozess
Guggenmos, Florian; Lockl, Jannik; Rieger, Alexander UL et al

in Informatik-Spektrum (2019)

Due to Germany's federal structures, IT architects in German authorities are often faced with major challenges. A large number of regionally different process variants must be mapped on heterogeneous IT ... [more ▼]

Due to Germany's federal structures, IT architects in German authorities are often faced with major challenges. A large number of regionally different process variants must be mapped on heterogeneous IT infrastructures. In addition, the exchange of information between authorities is not fully digitized and only partially standardized. One of the technologies that could create added value in this area of ​​conflict is blockchain. Together with the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, the applicability of the technology in the asylum area was examined in a proof-of-concept project. The central finding from the proof-of-concept is that a cross-agency blockchain solution in the asylum process is superior to central solutions in terms of integrity, performance, security and transparency. [less ▲]

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See detailAffordance-Experimentation-Actualization Theory in Artificial Intelligence Research : a Predictive Maintenance Story
Keller, Robert; Stohr, Alexander; Fridgen, Gilbert UL et al

in 40th International Conference on Information Systems (2019)

Artificial intelligence currently counts among the most prominent digital technologies and promises to generate significant business value in the future. Despite a growing body of knowledge, research ... [more ▼]

Artificial intelligence currently counts among the most prominent digital technologies and promises to generate significant business value in the future. Despite a growing body of knowledge, research could further benefit from incorporating technological features, human actors, and organizational goals into the examination of artificial intelligence-enabled systems. This integrative perspective is crucial for effective implementation. Our study intends to fill this gap by introducing affordance-experimentation-actualization theory to artificial intelligence research. In doing so, we conduct a case study on the implementation of predictive maintenance using affordance-experimentation-actualization theory as our theoretical lens. From our study, we find further evidence for the existence of the experimentation phase during which organizations make new technologies ready for effective use. We propose extending the experimentation phase with the activity of ‘conceptual exploration’ in order to make affordance-experimentation-actualization theory applicable to a broader range of technologies and the domain of AI-enabled systems in particular. [less ▲]

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See detailOne Rate Does Not Fit All: An Empirical Analysis of Electricity Tariffs for Residential Microgrids
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Kahlen, Micha; Ketter, Wolfgang et al

in Applied Energy (2018), 210

Residential microgrids are poised to play an important role in future distributed energy networks. However, energy retailers have yet to identify effective electricity tariffs to incorporate residential ... [more ▼]

Residential microgrids are poised to play an important role in future distributed energy networks. However, energy retailers have yet to identify effective electricity tariffs to incorporate residential microgrids into the energy value chain. For this reason, we have chosen to analyze a set of twelve representative tariff options retailers might offer in the future. To examine their effects on load profiles and electricity bills, we set up a comprehensive empirical evaluation framework. Our analyses identify three important recommendations for residential microgrid pricing: First, energy retailers should not offer volumetric tariffs as they result in higher electricity bills, encourage sharp peak loads, and fail to fully allocate system costs. Second, they should also be cautious in offering time-varying and especially real-time rates. Although these rates promise slightly lower energy bills for microgrid operators, they can destabilize load profiles if retailers fail to simultaneously introduce peak-moderating capacity charges. Third, energy retailers should consider tariffs with capacity and customer charges, which we find to lower electricity costs, foster peak shaving, and facilitate stable cost allocation. [less ▲]

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See detailSolution-based Innovation : A Method for Emerging Technology Use Case Development
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Lockl, Jannik; Radszuwill, Sven et al

in Workshop Blockchain Research ? Beyond the Horizon, European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS) (2018)

Interest in blockchain is growing rapidly and at a global scale. The potential to disrupt various industries is attributed to the emerging blockchain technology. Organizations and institutions have thus ... [more ▼]

Interest in blockchain is growing rapidly and at a global scale. The potential to disrupt various industries is attributed to the emerging blockchain technology. Organizations and institutions have thus begun to examine the emerging the technology and its impact on their businesses. However, researchers and practitioners still lack a systematic approach to understand the po-tential of blockchain and to develop convincing use cases. We addressed this research gap by applying an action design research approach and situational method engineering to propose a method for the development of blockchain technology use cases. Following this approach, we iteratively evaluate and further develop the proposed method through application in four distinct industries. In a next research step, we now focus on a broader context and evaluate if our existing use case development method is applicable for other emerging technologies than blockchain. By doing so, we seek to broaden our evaluation, generalize our method, and support practitioners and researchers in better leveraging the opportunities of continuous digital transformation. [less ▲]

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See detailSupport of communication and cooperation in the asylum process with the help of blockchain: A feasibility study by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Guggenmos, Florian; Lockl, Jannik et al

Report (2018)

Digital technologies are changing our society in many ways. In addition to significant increases in productivity and new forms of value creation, the rapid digital change also brings with it a multitude ... [more ▼]

Digital technologies are changing our society in many ways. In addition to significant increases in productivity and new forms of value creation, the rapid digital change also brings with it a multitude of political and social challenges. While the digitization of the public sector in Germany is still facing challenges, other countries are already further. For example, Estonia has already largely digitized its administration. The federal government would also like to advance Germany with a targeted digitization strategy and strengthen public administration through the use of digital technologies. One of the focus technologies in this context is blockchain. Blockchain is a decentralized data structure, in which data in cryptographically linked blocks can be stored invariably and traceably. The essential concept of blockchain technology is to manage the data to be stored through a subscriber network instead of a central instance. In addition, new blockchain technologies make it possible to automate parts of the cross-agency process management. Due to its properties, blockchain technology offers a good opportunity for coordination in federal structures, as required by the German asylum process. In addition to one body primarily responsible, the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, other authorities at both federal and state level are involved in the asylum process. For example, initial reception centers and immigration authorities are subordinate to the respective federal states or part of the local government. This results in a large number of process variants, heterogeneous IT infrastructures and an incomplete digital exchange of information. A cross-agency data source already exists in the form of the Central Register of Foreigners (AZR). The AZR contains a large amount of data that may be recorded and stored by the authorized authorities in accordance with applicable law (especially AZRG). In addition, there is a need for IT-based support for cross-agency communication and cooperation. The Federal Office for Migration and Refugees has now evaluated to what extent blockchain can contribute to overcoming these challenges and promote the establishment of digital identities in the asylum context as well as cross-agency communication and cooperation. A proof-of-concept project that the Federal Office carried out in the first half of 2018 serves as an essential reference point. The project began with the selection of the use case ("simplified asylum process") and a pre-evaluation of the suitability of the blockchain technology. After a positive pre-evaluation, a suitable system was developed by a mixed team from the Federal Office, the Fraunhofer FIT Business Informatics project group and a technology partner. The project was then evaluated according to a blockchain-specific evaluation framework. In addition to technical and professional aspects, the focus here was in particular on issues relating to data protection law. The proof-of-concept project has shown that the use of blockchain technology could support cross-agency communication and cooperation in the asylum process. In addition, blockchain could lay an important foundation for the establishment of digital identities and make the process flow of an asylum seeker traceable on the basis of such an identity. It is true that it has not yet been possible to fully implement all applicable data protection regulations in the developed proof-of-concept. However, the knowledge gained in the course of the project forms a promising basis for the development of a data protection-compliant blockchain-based solution for the asylum process. In addition, due to the federal structure taken into account, the developed concept could also be scaled beyond Germany's borders. A blockchain-based, transnational management of asylum processes could thus become a joint project of the European member states to strengthen cooperation while preserving federal structures. Blockchain technology could thus be the beginning of digital federalism in Europe (also in the asylum area). [less ▲]

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