References of "Ravaud, J. F"
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See detailSocial support and subsequent premature mortality, gender disparities and role of potential confounders.
Chau, N.; Otero-Sierra, C.; Ravaud, J. F. et al

in Psychology & Health (2010), suppl

To assess the association between social support and subsequent premature mortality (PM) (<70 years), gender difference, and the confounding role of age, occupation, health-related behaviors, obesity, and ... [more ▼]

To assess the association between social support and subsequent premature mortality (PM) (<70 years), gender difference, and the confounding role of age, occupation, health-related behaviors, obesity, and diseases. Methods: 4118 subjects (2189 men, 1929 women), aged >15 years, randomly selected in north-eastern France, completed in 1996 a postal questionnaire gathering characteristics, smoking, alcohol abuse, obesity, social support from colleagues/family/friends, and physician-diagnosed diseases. The cohort was followed-up until 2008 (12.5 years). Data were analyzed using Poisson models. Results: There were 165 PM (115 men, 50 women) during the follow-up. For all the cohort, social support was strongly associated with PM: crude relative risk (RR) 2.09 (95%CI 1.53-2.85). It decreased to 1.52 (1.11-2.09) when adjusted for age, 1.46 (1.06-2.00) with further adjustment for occupation, 1.44 (1.04-1.98) with further adjustment for smoking, alcohol abuse and obesity, and 1.28 (0.92-1.78) when diseases (cancer, diabetes, mental, nervous-system, cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary and musculoskeletal diseases) were taken into account. Similar results were found for men: crude RR 2.46 decreasing to 1.81, 1.70, 1.60, 1.45 respectively. But not for women: close-to-significant crude RR 1.57 (small number of PM). Conclusions: Social support influenced PM in men but not in women. Occupation, health behaviours, and diseases play a role. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations of social and material deprivation with tobacco, alcohol, and psychotropic drug use, and gender differentials: a population-based study
Baumann, Michèle UL; Spitz, Elisabeth; Guillemin, F. et al

in International Journal of Health Geographics (2007), 2

The aim was to assess the relationships between social and material deprivation and the use of tobacco, excessive alcohol and psychotropic drugs by both sexes and in various age groups. Greater knowledge ... [more ▼]

The aim was to assess the relationships between social and material deprivation and the use of tobacco, excessive alcohol and psychotropic drugs by both sexes and in various age groups. Greater knowledge concerning these issues may help public health policy-makers design more effective means of preventing substance abuse. Methods: The sample comprised 6,216 people aged ≥ 15 years randomly selected from the population in northeastern France. Subjects completed a post-mailed questionnaire covering socio-demographic characteristics, occupation, employment, income, smoking habit, alcohol abuse and "psychotropic" drug intake (for headache, tiredness, nervousness, anxiety, insomnia). A deprivation score (D) was defined by the cumulative number of: low educational level, manual worker, unemployed, living alone, nationality other than western European, low income, and non-home-ownership. Data were analysed using adjusted odds ratios (ORa) computed with logistic models. Results: Deprivation was common: 37.4% of respondents fell into category D = 1, 21.2% into D = 2, and 10.0% into D ≥ 3. More men than women reported tobacco use (30.2% vs. 21.9%) and alcohol abuse (12.5% vs. 3.3%), whereas psychotropic drug use was more common among women (23.8% vs. 41.0%). Increasing levels of deprivation were associated with a greater likelihood of tobacco use (ORa vs. D = 0: 1.16 in D = 1, 1.49 in D = 2, and 1.93 in D ≥ 3), alcohol abuse (1.19 in D = 1, 1.32 in D = 2, and 1.80 in D ≥ 3) and frequent psychotropic drug intake (1.26 in D = 1, 1.51 in D = 2, and 1.91 in D ≥ 3). These patterns were observed in working/other non-retired men and women (except for alcohol abuse in women). Among retired people, deprivation was associated with tobacco and psychotropic drug use only in men. Conclusion: Preventive measures should be designed to improve work conditions, reduce deprivation, and help deprived populations to be more aware of risk and to find remedial measures. [less ▲]

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