References of "Pi Alperin, Maria Noel"
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See detailMeasuring and accounting for the deprivation gap of Portuguese immigrants in Luxembourg
Hildebrand, Vincent A.; Pi Alperin, Maria Noel; Van Kerm, Philippe UL

in Review of Income and Wealth (2017), 63(2), 288-309

This paper examines the relative well-being of Portuguese immigrants in Luxembourg by looking at indicators of material deprivation. We document material deprivation differences between immigrants and ... [more ▼]

This paper examines the relative well-being of Portuguese immigrants in Luxembourg by looking at indicators of material deprivation. We document material deprivation differences between immigrants and nationals---the `deprivation gap'---and measure the extent to which income differentials (and other sociodemographic differences) explain this gap using a combination of non-parametric methods and a versatile graphical device. We find a large and significant deprivation gap against Portuguese immigrants, whatever the indicator considered. The extent to which the gap is merely a reflection of differences in income, however, depends on what deprivation items are taken into consideration. Income differences almost fully account for material deprivation differences when the latter is measured using the items included in the official EU social indicator of material deprivation. Inclusion of housing condition indicators mitigates this relationship and we then find compelling evidence that the deprivation gap is not entirely accounted for by income differentials. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (4 UL)
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See detailLuxembourg: Has inequality grown enough to matter?
Fusco, Alessio; Van Kerm, Philippe UL; Alieva, Aigul et al

in Nolan, Brian; Salverda, Wiemer; Checchi, Daniele (Eds.) et al Changing Inequalities and Societal Impacts in Rich Countries: Thirty Countries' Experiences (2014)

Luxembourg experienced remarkable economic performance and employment growth since the middle of the 1980s. Based on the development of the financial sector, this growth benefited massively from the ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg experienced remarkable economic performance and employment growth since the middle of the 1980s. Based on the development of the financial sector, this growth benefited massively from the contribution of immigrants and cross-border workers to the labour force. High economic growth led to a rapid improvement in the overall living standard of the resident population. During the same period, income inequality increased too, albeit modestly. Even if the country can still be considered a low inequality country by international standards, this trend is a potential source of concern. This chapter analyses the factors that explain the rise in income inequality between 1985 and 2010 and provides a descriptive account of whether this trend has been correlated with a set of social, cultural, and political outcomes. By and large, the positive impact of the improvement of overall living standards seems to have prevailed over the potential detrimental effects of increasing inequality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 189 (4 UL)
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See detailInequality, growth and mobility: The intertemporal distribution of income in European countries 2003--2007
Van Kerm, Philippe UL; Pi Alperin, Maria Noel

in Economic Modelling (2013), 35(C), 931-939

This paper exploits EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions longitudinal data 2003–2007 to describe the intertemporal distribution of income in twenty-six European countries prior to the onset of ... [more ▼]

This paper exploits EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions longitudinal data 2003–2007 to describe the intertemporal distribution of income in twenty-six European countries prior to the onset of the Great Recession. We document levels, inequality and progressivity in the distribution of year-on-year income gains and losses and examine the relationship of these with inequality and poverty indicators. New Member States have typically seen individual incomes grow faster than other EU countries. Income gains were disproportionately pro-poor in all countries. We therefore observe regression to the mean both among EU countries and among individuals within countries. However, short-run income mobility does not significantly reduce inequality of time-averaged incomes. Potential issues about cross-country comparability of the data and the short period under consideration call for caution in interpreting our results, however. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (2 UL)