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See detailDétection des vulnérabilités dans la procédure de protection internationale
Petry, Ralph UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2021)

La vulnérabilité des demandeurs de protection internationale est un élément clé de l’acquis communautaire en matière d’asile. La directive relative aux procédures d’asile (2013/32/UE – refonte) et la ... [more ▼]

La vulnérabilité des demandeurs de protection internationale est un élément clé de l’acquis communautaire en matière d’asile. La directive relative aux procédures d’asile (2013/32/UE – refonte) et la directive sur les conditions d’accueil (2013/33/UE – refonte) prévoient des dispositions particulières pour les personnes vulnérables en ce qui concerne, respectivement, la procédure de protection internationale (c’est-à-dire des garanties procédurales spéciales) et l’accueil (c’est-à-dire des besoins particuliers en matière d’accueil). Par conséquent, pour que les États membres soient en mesure de prévoir et de garantir ces dispositions particulières pour les demandeurs vulnérables, il est essentiel qu’une vulnérabilité potentielle soit détectée et identifiée à un stade précoce de la procédure de protection internationale. C’est dans ce contexte que EMN Luxembourg a décidé, en consultation avec les autorités luxembourgeoises et des acteurs nationaux, de lancer une demande d’information aux Etats membres. L’objectif de cette note de synthèse est de déterminer comment les vulnérabilités des demandeurs de protection internationale sont détectées dans le cadre de la procédure de protection internationale dans les Etats membres de l’UE et comment le suivi de cette détection est garanti par les autorités et les acteurs impliqués, y compris les garanties procédurales spéciales. [less ▲]

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See detailLe point du contact national luxembourgeois du Réseau européen des migrations
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL

Presentation (2021, October 26)

The presentation describes the structure, aims and objectives of the European Migration Network and the structure, aim and activities of EMN Luxembourg.

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See detailDetection of vulnerabilities in the international protection procedure
Petry, Ralph UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2021)

The vulnerability of applicants for international protection is a key component of the EU acquis on asylum, with both the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU) and the Recast Reception ... [more ▼]

The vulnerability of applicants for international protection is a key component of the EU acquis on asylum, with both the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU) and the Recast Reception Conditions Directive (2013/33/EU) providing special provisions for vulnerable persons with regard to the procedure for international protection (i.e. special procedural guarantees) and reception (i.e. special reception needs), respectively. Hence, in order for Member States to be able to provide and guarantee these special provisions for vulnerable applicants, it is essential that a potential vulnerability is detected and identified at an early stage in the international protection procedure. It is in this context that EMN Luxembourg decided, in consultation with the Luxembourgish authorities and national stakeholders, to launch a request for information to Member States via the EMN ad-hoc query system. As a consequence, the aim of this Inform is to map how vulnerabilities of applicants for international protection are detected in the international protection procedure in EU Member States and how the follow-up of this detection is guaranteed by the authorities and stakeholders involved, including special procedural guarantees. [less ▲]

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See detailDetention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg. Luxembourgish legislation, namely the amended Law of 29 August 2008 on Free Movement of Persons and Immigration (Immigration Law) and the Law of 18 December 2015 on International Protection and Temporary Protection (Asylum Law), foresees three alternatives to detention: - Alternative 1: Reporting obligations, which includes the obligation to surrender a passport, travel document or identity document; - Alternative 2: Home custody (+ electronic monitoring, if necessary); - Alternative 3: Deposition of a financial guarantee of 5.000€. In principle, the assessment between detention or alternatives to detention is made at the same time as when the grounds for detention are considered, as long as the Directorate of Immigration, as the responsible authority, has all the necessary information to decide if an alternative to detention can be ordered. Furthermore, the possibility to impose an alternative to detention is in principle systemically considered, as both relevant laws foresee that the detention decision is ordered in writing by the Minister on the basis of a case-by-case assessment, where necessary and if other less coercive measures cannot be effectively applied. Grounds for detention are generally rejected in favour of an alternative to detention if the person concerned falls within the category of vulnerable groups and if person is able to proof effective guarantees of representation to prevent the risk of absconding. This latter obligation on the third-country national to revert the legal presumption that there is a risk of absconding remains the main challenge because effective guarantees of representation are not defined by law. This is particularly challenging in the context of return procedures, where this legal presumption exists in nearly all cases where a third-country national has no valid identity, travel or residence documents. In the absence of such effective guarantees of representation, the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum generally does not make the decision to apply an alternative to detention. Consequently, the research in the context of this study has shown that alternatives to detention are only rarely used in Luxembourg, with the important exception of home custody in the Emergency Housing Structure of Kirchberg (‘Structure d’hébergement d’urgence Kirchberg’ – SHUK). The SHUK serves as a semi-open return facility for applicants for international protection and irregularly staying third-country nationals whose fingerprints have already been registered in Eurodac by another Member State and are therefore likely to be transferred to that Member State, in accordance with the Dublin III Regulation. A placement at the SHUK corresponds to home custody. The rare use of alternatives to detention also results in the fact that there is generally not much data available in this regard, with the important exception of home custody in the SHUK, which is more widely used. [less ▲]

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See detailRAPPORT ANNUEL SUR LES MIGRATIONS ET L'ASILE Luxembourg 2020
Hallack, Florence UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2021)

This report traces the main developments and debates related to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2020. Apart from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on migration movements and policy, three key ... [more ▼]

This report traces the main developments and debates related to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2020. Apart from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on migration movements and policy, three key changes have taken place in 2020: 1) The creation of the National Office for Reception (ONA) and the Department of Integration, which replace the Luxembourg Office for Reception and Integration (OLAI). 2) Bill n°7682 has been tabled in the Chamber of Deputies. It aims to strengthen the security of identity cards issued to European Union (EU) citizens and family members exercising their right to free movement, to simplify administrative procedures, and to amend certain provisions concerning family reunification, intra-corporate transfers (ICT) and trainees. 3) Bill No. 7681 aims to amend the procedure for appealing against a Dublin transfer decision in order to increase its effectiveness while ensuring maximum legal certainty for the applicant for international protection. It also proposes to amend the Asylum Act by introducing "extraordinary" remedies against a final decision to close a procedure and against a decision to withdraw international protection. [less ▲]

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See detailANNUAL REPORT ON MIGRATION AND ASYLUM Luxembourg 2020
Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2021)

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from ... [more ▼]

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from Luxembourg. In 2020, there was a significant decrease in the number of residence permits, applications for temporary authorisation of stay and visas (short stay visas and D-visas), a reduction of around 50% on the number of applications for international protection and a decline in Dublin transfers and returns. Public health measures in response to the pandemic significantly impacted migration policies. For instance, Luxembourg temporarily closed its borders to third-country nationals and automatically regularized the stay of third-country nationals whose legal residence status ended during the state of crisis. Moreover, personal interviews with applicants of international protection (AIPs) and Dublin transfers were suspended. Lastly, irregular migrants were granted access to healthcare, free of charge, regardless of their social security coverage without being issued a return order or being placed in detention during the pandemic. Outside of the COVID-19 context, the following developments can be highlighted: The introduction of Bill n°7682 foresees the extension of the time limit from three to six months available to beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) to apply for family reunification after the granting of their status, as well as the simplification of administrative procedures, concerning the elimination of the requirement to provide integral copies of travel documents for family members of the third-country national applying for family reunification. At the procedural level, Bill n°7682 aims to amend the appeal procedure against a Dublin transfer decision to increase their effectiveness while guaranteeing maximum legal security for the applicant for international protection. It proposes to amend the Asylum Law by introducing “extraordinary” remedies against a final decision to close proceedings and against a decision to withdraw international protection. The Grand Ducal Regulation of 4 November 2020 entered into force, establishing the Commission on the evaluation of the best interest of unaccompanied minors in return decisions. However, this commission continues to generate debates and criticism, especially from fundamental rights organisations, regarding its composition. In view of the high occupancy rate in the ONA’s accommodation structures, efforts to promote the construction of new accommodation structures continued in 2020. A new emergency reception facility was set up for newcomers. Strengthening the fight against trafficking in human beings was another priority of the Luxembourgish government. As a result, the composition of the Monitoring Committee on the Fight Against the Trafficking in Human Beings was implemented by Grand Ducal Regulation. Other strategic developments were implemented, such as the elaboration of a second National Action Plan on Human Trafficking and an enhanced collaboration at the Benelux and EU level. In terms of integration, several major developments should be noted: The creation of a communication service within the Department of Integration The first interministerial committee on integration open to civil society took place on 16 December 2020 The launch of a large consultation including all key actors on the future of integration policies The selection of several municipalities to take part in a pilot phase regarding a new approach to the Communal Plan on Integration (PCI) A discussion in Parliament on the issue of racism and discrimination, which resulted in the adoption of two motions and a resolution. One of the motions provided for a study on racism and ethno-racial discrimination and the resolution aims to strengthen the resources of the Centre for Equal Treatment (CET). The Minister of Education, Children and Youth is planning to set up a service specifically responsible for the integration and reception of children of foreign origin and to review the procedures for taking care of newly arrived pupils [less ▲]

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See detailAccurate, timely, interoperable? Data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg. The Luxembourgish ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg. The Luxembourgish Asylum Law foresees a centralised and streamlined asylum system with one single national authority for registering, lodging and examining applications for international protection, namely the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, implemented by the Directorate of Immigration. The Asylum Law clearly distinguishes the phases of making, registering and lodging an application for international protection. In practice, however, the three phases generally occur on the same day or within a few working days if the claim is not directly made to the Directorate of Immigration. Furthermore, the asylum system does not differentiate between the different types of entry routes to Luxembourgish territory. As a consequence, applicants for international protection have a swift access to the asylum procedure once they express their wish to apply for international protection in Luxembourg. In addition to the tracks foreseen in the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU), Luxembourg operates a fourth track in the form of the ultra-accelerated procedure, which was introduced in 2017 as a practical acceleration of the accelerated procedure for applicants stemming from safe countries of origin from the Western Balkan countries and Georgia. The study provides an detailed overview of what data is collected from applicants of international protection, at what stage of the procedure this data is collected and by whom, as well as where and how this data is stored. Lastly, the study has shown that, despite the increase of applications since 2015 and a consistent high number of applications since then, the processing times have decreased significantly, in particular since 2017. [less ▲]

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See detailAcquisition of citizenship in Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

This presentation maps the key findings of the EMN Study “Pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg”, published in December 2019. It provides a brief overview of the three pathways ... [more ▼]

This presentation maps the key findings of the EMN Study “Pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg”, published in December 2019. It provides a brief overview of the three pathways through which third-country nationals can acquire Luxembourgish citizenship after birth, presents key figures, elaborates on the legislative changes regarding the Luxembourgish nationality law and briefly maps the public debate on the subject. [less ▲]

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See detailLe statut de résident de longue durée dans l'UE
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

Les ressortissants de pays tiers migrent vers l’Union européenne pour différentes raisons : raisons économiques, raisons familiales, pour suivre des études ou pour obtenir une protection internationale ... [more ▼]

Les ressortissants de pays tiers migrent vers l’Union européenne pour différentes raisons : raisons économiques, raisons familiales, pour suivre des études ou pour obtenir une protection internationale. Certaines de ces personnes restent sur le territoire des États membres de nombreuses années, et tissent des liens avec l’État membre concerné. C’est pourquoi l’intégration des ressortissants de pays tiers résidents de longue durée dans les États membres est considérée comme un élément clé pour promouvoir la cohésion économique et sociale au sein de l’Union européenne. L’un des premiers textes législatifs adoptés par l’UE en matière d’immigration vers l’Union européenne a été la directive 2003/109/CE du Conseil du 25 novembre 2003 relative au statut des ressortissants de pays tiers résidents de longue durée (ci-après la « directive »). Bien que la directive soit entrée en vigueur le 23 janvier 2006, sa mise en œuvre par les États membres n’a pas été uniforme. C’est la raison pour laquelle l’EMN Luxembourg a décidé, à la demande des autorités luxembourgeoises, de lancer une étude sur ce sujet par l’intermédiaire du Réseau européen des migrations. Comme il était nécessaire de procéder à une évaluation adéquate de la mise en œuvre de la directive, le comité directeur du REM a mandaté, le 21 octobre 2019, l’EMN Luxembourg de recueillir des informations via le mécanisme des questions ad-hoc du REM afin d’établir l’état des lieux de la mise en œuvre de la directive. Les informations nécessaires à l’élaboration de la présente note de synthèse ont été recueillies par le biais de quatre questions ad-hoc du REM portant sur des aspects spécifiques du statut de résident de longue durée (ci-après le « statut RLD ») dans l’UE. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term resident status in the EU
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

Third-country nationals migrate to the European Union for different reasons: economic migration, family reasons, studies, or in search of international protection. Some of these individuals stay in the ... [more ▼]

Third-country nationals migrate to the European Union for different reasons: economic migration, family reasons, studies, or in search of international protection. Some of these individuals stay in the territory of the Member States for a considerable number of years and develop attachments to the Member State. For this reason, integration of third-country nationals who are long-term residents in the Member States is considered as a key element in promoting economic and social cohesion in the European Union. One of the first pieces of EU legislation that was adopted dealing with immigration to the European Union was the Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents. While the Directive entered into force on 23 January 2006, the implementation of the Directive by Member States had not been uniform. This is the reason why EMN Luxembourg decided, at the request of the Luxembourgish authorities, to launch a study on this topic through the European Migration Network. As it was necessary to make a proper assessment of the implementation of the Directive, it was decided by the EMN Steering Board on 21 October 2019 that EMN Luxembourg would collect information through the EMN Ad-Hoc Query mechanism to establish the set out a state of play of the implementation of the Directive. The information for elaborating this Inform was collected through four EMN Ad-hoc queries highlighting specific elements of the long-term resident status in the EU. [less ▲]

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See detailANNUAL REPORT ON MIGRATION AND ASYLUM Luxembourg 2019
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2020)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2019. Luxembourg remains an important country of immigration, as evidenced ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2019. Luxembourg remains an important country of immigration, as evidenced by the figures on net migration, which remains the main reason for the demographic growth of the Luxembourgish resident population. Net immigration of third-country nationals remains high (7 336) and exceeds that of citizens of the European Union (EU; 4 806). The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2019 (2 047 applications) compared to the levels registered pre-‘migration crisis’ (1 091 in 2014). Family reunification remains the principal reason for third-country nationals to immigrate to Luxembourg, followed by economic reasons and international protection. Several major developments occurred in the field of legal migration. The introduction of a new long-term visa simplifies the entry and stay of third-country nationals for a period of up to one year, without having to apply for a residence permit. In order to guarantee the rights of British citizens working and residing in Luxembourg before the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the EU (Brexit) four laws were adopted, most of them were supposed to enter into force if there was a non-deal Brexit. Other important changes related to migration result from the adoption of the law of 4 December 2019 amending the law of 29 August 2009 on the free movement of persons and immigration (hereinafter Immigration Law). This law takes into account the expert’s comments during the evaluation in 2016 of the application of Schengen. [less ▲]

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See detailL’accès à la nationalité luxembourgeoise pour ressortissants de pays tiers
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2020)

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le Point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations (EMN Luxembourg) intitulée « Pathways to ... [more ▼]

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le Point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations (EMN Luxembourg) intitulée « Pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg » qui a été publiée en décembre 2019. Cette étude fournit un aperçu de l’accès à la nationalité luxembourgeoise des ressortissants de pays tiers par voie procédurale, et plus précisément sur l’acquisition par naturalisation. Toutefois, cette note ne serait pas complète si l’obtention automatique de la nationalité luxembourgeoise ainsi que les deux autres modes d’acquisition procédurales, à savoir l’option et le recouvrement, ne seraient pas abordées. L’annexe conférence 2020 présente une mise à jour de la note de synthèse « L’accès à la nationalité luxembourgeoise pour ressortissants de pays tiers » publiée en février 2020. Cette mise à jour tient compte d’un changement législatif, entré en vigueur le 25 juin 2020, ainsi que des statistiques des acquisitions de nationalité luxembourgeoise qui ont eu lieu en 2019. En outre, l’annexe présente des informations sur deux éléments faisant partie de l’ordre du jour de la conférence annuelle 2020, à savoir l’incidence du Brexit sur les acquisitions de nationalité luxembourgeoise depuis 2015 et le droit à la nationalité pour enfants apatrides. [less ▲]

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See detailRAPPORT ANNUEL SUR LES MIGRATIONS ET L'ASILE Luxembourg 2019
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2020)

Le présent rapport trace les principaux développements et débats relatifs à la migration et à l'asile au Luxembourg en 2019. Le Luxembourg reste un pays d'immigration important, comme en témoignent les ... [more ▼]

Le présent rapport trace les principaux développements et débats relatifs à la migration et à l'asile au Luxembourg en 2019. Le Luxembourg reste un pays d'immigration important, comme en témoignent les chiffres du solde migratoire, qui reste la principale raison de la croissance démographique de la population résidente luxembourgeoise. L'immigration nette de ressortissants de pays tiers reste élevée (7 336) et dépasse celle des citoyens de l'Union européenne (UE; 4 806). Le nombre de personnes demandant une protection internationale est resté élevé en 2019 (2 047 demandes) par rapport aux niveaux enregistrés avant la «crise migratoire» (1 091 en 2014). Le regroupement familial reste la principale raison pour laquelle les ressortissants de pays tiers immigrent au Luxembourg, suivi des raisons économiques et de la protection internationale. Plusieurs développements majeurs se sont produits dans le domaine de la migration légale. L'introduction d'un nouveau visa de longue durée simplifie l'entrée et le séjour des ressortissants de pays tiers pour une période pouvant aller jusqu'à un an, sans avoir à demander un permis de séjour. Afin de garantir les droits des citoyens britanniques travaillant et résidant au Luxembourg avant le retrait du Royaume-Uni (UK) de l'UE (Brexit), quatre lois ont été adoptées, la plupart d'entre elles étant censées entrer en vigueur en cas d’un Brexit sans accord. D'autres changements importants liés à la migration résultent de l'adoption de la loi du 4 décembre 2019 modifiant la loi du 29 août 2009 sur la libre circulation des personnes et l'immigration. Cette loi prend en compte les commentaires de l'expert lors de l'évaluation en 2016 de l'application de Schengen. [less ▲]

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See detailPathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg, with a ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg, with a particular focus on the ordinary naturalisation procedure. The laws and regulations regarding the acquisition of nationality in Luxembourg underwent a complete overhaul in 2017, with the amended Law of 8 March 2017 on Luxembourgish nationality abrogating the Law of 23 October 2008. This new Nationality Law instituted a number of important overarching modifications and additions that are addressed throughout the study. In general, the Luxembourg Nationality Law does not differentiate between applications introduced by EU citizens or third-country nationals. Apart from obtaining Luxembourgish nationality by simple operation of law, i.e. automatically and without any action being taken by the person concerned, the Luxembourgish Nationality Law foresees three modes through which a third-country national can acquire Luxembourgish nationality by procedural means: acquisition of nationality via ordinary naturalisation, via option or via reclamation. A look at the statistics regarding the acquisition of nationality via procedural means, including all the pathways open to third-country nationals, for the period 2014 to 2018 show that the simplified option procedure (regrouping all the 10 specific cases) is the most common pathway through which third-country nationals have acquired Luxembourgish nationality, followed by the reclamation procedure and the ordinary naturalization. In this context, it is important to make a distinction between acquisitions by residents of Luxembourg and by persons that are not residing in Luxembourg. Luxembourg introduced the principle of multiple nationalities through the legislative reform of 2008, which resulted in a significant increase of acquisitions of Luxembourgish nationality, as applicants are no longer required to renounce their other nationality or nationalities. [less ▲]

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See detailLes voies migratoires pour fondateurs de start-ups et entrepreneurs innovants au Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2019)

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le Point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations (EMN Luxembourg) intitulée: « Migratory pathways ... [more ▼]

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le Point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations (EMN Luxembourg) intitulée: « Migratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs in the EU and Norway » qui a été publié en juillet 2019. Cette étude fournit un aperçu de l’écosystème luxembourgeois ainsi que des politiques et pratiques en vigueur afin d’attirer, soutenir et retenir les fondateurs de start-ups/entrepreneurs innovants. Au Luxembourg, le soutien aux start-ups et aux entrepreneurs innovants, indépendamment de leur pays d’origine, est considéré comme une priorité politique nationale depuis 2013. Cependant, le Luxembourg, à la différence des autres Etats membres, n’a pas développé un cadre législatif spécifique visant spécifiquement à attirer des fondateurs de start-ups et des entrepreneurs innovants issus de pays tiers. L’objectif principal est d’attirer l’investissement international, des entreprises innovatrices et des chercheurs en général. Cette approche est le résultat d’un marché du travail très particulier qui dépend fondamentalement de la main d’œuvre transfrontalière et européenne. Dans ce cadre, les voies migratoires proposées aux fondateurs de start-ups/entrepreneurs innovants par la loi sur la libre circulation de personnes et immigration7 (ci-après: la loi d’immigration) sont celles couvertes par les titres de séjour « travailleur indépendant » ou « investisseur ». Selon les autorités, ce cadre légal est suffisant par rapport aux besoins actuels et au nombre de titres de séjour accordés pour ce type d’immigration. [less ▲]

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See detailLes statuts alternatifs de protection au Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2019)

Cette note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau européen des migrations intitulée « Comparative overview of national ... [more ▼]

Cette note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2019 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du Réseau européen des migrations intitulée « Comparative overview of national protection statuses in the EU and Norway ». Le Luxembourg participe au système d’asile européen commun depuis la loi du 5 mai 2006 relative au droit d’asile et à des formes complémentaires de protection, loi qui a été abrogée par la loi modifiée du 18 décembre 2015 sur la protection internationale et la protection temporaire. Dans ces deux textes légaux est incluse la protection internationale (statut de réfugié et protection subsidiaire) ainsi que la protection temporaire. Cependant, ils ne prévoient aucun autre type de protection humanitaire. On trouve deux « statuts humanitaires » dans un autre cadre légal, à savoir la loi modifiée du 29 août 2008 portant sur la libre circulation des personnes et l’immigration (ciaprès « loi d’immigration »): 1) L’autorisation de séjour pour des motifs humanitaires d’une exceptionnelle gravité (article 78 (3)); 2) Le sursis à l’éloignement pour raisons médicales (article 131(1)) et l’autorisation de séjour pour raisons médicales (article 131 (2)). [less ▲]

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See detailMigratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Coda, Nicolas UL et al

Report (2019)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about migratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about migratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to Luxembourg. Fostering start-ups and innovative enterprises is a national policy priority for Luxembourg as providing support to entrepreneurship and start-ups has been on the Luxembourgish governments’ agenda since 2013. It has been a part of a more general diversification policy of existing economic structures in order to increase economic growth of the country and reduce dependence on the financial sector, which remains the dominant economic pillar. The current Governmental programme 2018–2023 encourages support to start-ups, the acceleration of the development of the start-up ecosystem in Luxembourg as well as the promotion of Luxembourg as a ‘start-up nation’ both at national and international level. What should be pointed out is that this policy is not specifically targeted at third-country start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs, but aims to attract international investment, (innovative) enterprises and researchers in general. Thus, the mainstream immigration policy established by the amended Law of 29 August 2008 on free movement of persons (hereafter referred to as ‘Immigration Law’) for ‘self-employed worker’ or ‘investor’ residence permits is applied. The conditions that need to be fulfilled in order to be issued either a ‘self-employed worker’ or ‘investor’ residence permit as well as the conditions for the renewal of the residence permits are explained in detail in Section 3.3 and in Section 5, respectively. Several of the stakeholders involved in the context of this study reported that the existing regulations are sufficient and there is no need to introduce new ones or ones that would specifically target third-country nationals. Several initiatives have implemented in order to support the development of innovation in Luxembourg. Luxinnovation, the National Agency for the promotion of Research, Development and Innovation, was established already in 1985 and currently is reinforcing Government’s economic development objectives by providing support to companies and researchers in order to foster innovation. One of these initiatives, launched by the Ministry of the Economy in 2015 and implemented by Luxinnovation, is the Fit4Start acceleration programme which is particularly aimed at innovative ICT start-ups and recently also at start-ups from the health technologies. This programme provides coaching, business development support and funding to innovative projects or young innovative start-ups from around the world. Another important policy in the context of this study is the amended Law of 17 May 2017 on the Promotion of Research, Development and Innovation which provides a national funding scheme for Young Innovative Enterprises. Under this scheme, unlisted small enterprises that are registered for a maximum of five years can apply for State aid at the Ministry of the Economy’s Research and Innovation Directorate. Furthermore, Luxinnovation also animates the Luxembourg Cluster Initiative established by the Government in 2002. The objective of this initiative is to encourage communication and exchange of knowledge between cluster members (involving both the public and private sector) as well as to encourage use of new technologies and identification of possible business opportunities. This study further presents a table of rights and incentive measures in place to attract start-up founders and particularly highlights the access to special funding and investments, the co-working spaces as well as the access to incubation/accelerator support programmes, among others. In addition to the elements presented above, this study also elaborates on the following questions: What is the process and what are the requirements for starting up a business in Luxembourg? What are the main sectors and industries in which Luxembourg aims to attract start-ups? What is the role of local and regional authorities in creating and supporting entrepreneurial ecosystems? What role can actors such as local authorities, the private sector or higher education institutions play in attracting start-ups? Are there factors/conditions in place that incentivise start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to use specific immigration routes? Lastly, with the use of fictional scenarios, four case studies aim to provide an understanding of the possible admission options of different types of start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs. [less ▲]

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See detailAttirer et retenir des étudiants internationaux au Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Coda, Nicolas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Article for general public (2019)

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2018 par le Point de contact Luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations intitulée : « Attracting and retaining ... [more ▼]

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2018 par le Point de contact Luxembourgeois du Réseau Européen des Migrations intitulée : « Attracting and retaining international students in the EU ». Cette étude fournit un aperçu des politiques et pratiques en vigueur au Luxembourg afin d’attirer et de retenir des étudiants internationaux. Elle se base essentiellement sur les informations recueillies jusqu’en novembre 2018 et n’englobe donc que peu d’évolutions qui ont pu se produire après cette date. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative overview of national protection statuses in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the temporary protection statuses, the Luxembourgish legal system foresees two humanitarian statuses which are: a) residence permit for private reasons based on serious humanitarian grounds; b) the postponement of removal based on medical reasons. In regard to the latter, there are the following steps: 1) the postponement of removal can be granted and renewed for up to 24 months; 2) after 2 years, if the medical condition persists, an authorisation of stay for medical reasons may be granted and a residence permit for private reasons may be issued. However, it is important to stress at this point that the Luxembourgish authorities do not consider the two aforementioned residence permits issued according to articles 78 (3) and 131 (2) of the Immigration Law as “protection statuses” as such, but precisely as residence permits issued to the applicant. The granting of these two “protection statuses” are based on the discretionary power of the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum. The residence permit for private reasons based on humanitarian grounds (Status A of this report) allows for the Minister to grant an authorisation to stay in the country to an irregular migrant if s/he is in in need to stay based on humanitarian reasons of exceptional circumstances. There is not an exhaustive list of reasons on which the Minister can base his/her decision. However, there is an exhaustive analysis of the reasons advance by the applicant. Any third country national irregularly staying on the territory can apply for this residence permit. However, in the case of rejected asylum seekers, the application will be rejected if the applicant advances the same reasons that s/he advanced during the international protection procedure. On the contrary, the residence permit for medical reasons requires that, in the first stage, the applicant had received a return decision and an order to leave the territory. In order to obtain the residence permit, he/she has to obtain first a decision for a postponement of removal for medical reasons that has to be renewed for two years before the applicant can file the application for the residence permit based on medical reasons. This residence permit is not granted automatically and if the applicant does not file his/her application after expiration of the postponement of removal for medical reasons after two years, s/he will be precluded and the return decision will be executed, except if s/he proves that s/he cannot be returned for medical reasons. In this case, the entire procedure will have to start again. [less ▲]

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See detailAttracting and retaining international students in the EU (Country report Luxembourg)
Petry, Ralph UL; Coda, Nicolas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2018)

Unlike many other EU Member States, the higher education system in Luxembourg is marked by a particular characteristic, namely the fact that the University of Luxembourg is the only public university in ... [more ▼]

Unlike many other EU Member States, the higher education system in Luxembourg is marked by a particular characteristic, namely the fact that the University of Luxembourg is the only public university in the country. Established by law in 2003, the University of Luxembourg is therefore the main actor in the higher education system and hosts the large majority of international students in Luxembourg. In addition to the University of Luxembourg, two more types of institutions complement the higher education system in Luxembourg and are recognised by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research as higher education institutions (hereafter referred to as ‘HEIs’), namely: 1. Secondary educational institutions offering educational programmes that award an advanced technician’s certificate (‘Brevet de technicien supérieur’ – ‘BTS’); 2. Private foreign universities having infrastructures or campus in Luxembourg. In order to be able to award higher education diplomas as well as to host international students, all HEIs are mandatorily required to be approved by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, with the exception of the University of Luxembourg because it was established by law. The admission conditions for international students to study at a HEI in Luxembourg are twofold: First, the international student must apply and be accepted at an approved HEI or at the University of Luxembourg. Second, once accepted at a HEI, s/he needs to apply for a temporary authorisation of stay, and subsequently, if applicable, a Visa D (valid for 3 months), from his/her country of origin before being authorised to travel to Luxembourg and before being issued a ‘student’ residence permit (valid for minimum 1 year and renewable) in Luxembourg. To conclude, the HEIs in Luxembourg, under the overall auspice of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, as well as the immigration authorities are the main stakeholders in the context of international students studying in Luxembourg. Luxembourg transposed the Directive (EU) 2016/801 by the Law of 1 August 2018, which amended the amended ‘Immigration Law’ and entered into force on 21 September 2018. In this context, the study highlights in particular the introduction of a new residence permit for ‘private reasons’ in view of seeking employment or establishing a business in Luxembourg. This residence permit was newly introduced by the transposition of the Directive and allows international graduates to remain in the country for a maximum duration of nine months in order to find a job or establish a business in relation to their academic training. Prior to the transposition, international students were only able to change their immigration status to ‘salaried worker’ immediately after their graduation. Moreover, the transposition modified a number of legal dispositions, such as the increase of the maximum amount of hours that students are authorised to work, from 10 hours to 15 hours per week. Furthermore, Bachelor students enrolled in their first year of academic studies as well as students enrolled in a study programme awarding them a ‘BTS’ are no longer excluded from exercising a salaried activity as allowed by law. Lastly, the transposition also facilitates the intra-European mobility of international students who follow a European or multilateral programme that contains mobility measures or a convention between two or more HEIs. The attraction and retention of international students are not considered as a national political priority per se by the Luxembourgish authorities, but have to be perceived in an overall national political priority of attracting “talents” to Luxembourg, i.e. (highly) qualified persons, regardless of their nationality and in the interest of the country and its economy. The stakeholders consulted in the context of this study identified several factors that may have positive effects on the attraction and retention of international students. These include, among others: - the geographical position of Luxembourg with an important financial sector and several European institutions - the multilingual environment of the country as well as the University of Luxembourg - the HEI ranking of the University of Luxembourg - the comparatively low levels of tuition fees, particularly of the national public HEIs - the fact that the level tuition fees is the same for every student, no matter his/her nationality, with the exception of examples from private HEIs Furthermore, the consulted stakeholders identified several examples of good practices in the context of this study, such as for example: - A close and diligent collaboration between all stakeholders, in particular between the Directorate of Immigration, the Ministry of Higher Education and Research and the University of Luxembourg - Quality management of private HEI (mainly through the approval procedure) in view of the best interest of students - Affordable tuitions fees in the higher education system At the same time, the consulted stakeholders have identified several challenges, such as: - the languages of instruction (with a strong emphasis on French and German especially at the Bachelor/‘BTS’ levels) and the primary working languages (French and Luxembourgish) - socio-economic factors, particularly the high costs of living and the challenge of finding affordable housing - authenticity and veracity of transmitted diplomas in the context of a diploma recognition - a challenging procedure related to the entrance exam for international students who hold a high school diploma issued in a country that is not a signatory country of Paris/Lisbon conventions - potential misuse of the ‘student’ residence permit in view of trying to stay in the country instead of succeeding in the studies. In addition to the major legislative change introduced by the transposition of the Directive and the various factors and challenges mentioned above, the study also highlights a number of initiatives, offered in particular by the University of Luxembourg, aiming to support international students after their graduation and to encourage them to establish and/or maintain a connection to the national labour market. The study concludes with a section on bilateral and multilateral cooperation with third countries, both at the level of the Luxembourgish State as well as at the level of HEIs, particularly of the University of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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