References of "Pesenti, Mauro"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExogenous covert shift of attention without the ability to plan eye movements.
Masson, Nicolas UL; Andres, Michael; Pereira, Sarah Carneiro et al

in Current biology : CB (2020), 30(18), 1032-1033

The automatic allocation of attention to a salient stimulus in the visual periphery (e.g., a traffic light turning red) while maintaining fixation elsewhere (e.g., on the car ahead) is referred to as ... [more ▼]

The automatic allocation of attention to a salient stimulus in the visual periphery (e.g., a traffic light turning red) while maintaining fixation elsewhere (e.g., on the car ahead) is referred to as exogenous covert shift of attention (ECSA). An influential explanation is that ECSA results from the programming of a saccadic eye movement toward the stimulus of interest [1,2], although the actual movement may be withheld if needed. In this paper, however, we report evidence of ECSA in the paralyzed axis of three individuals with either horizontal or vertical congenital gaze paralysis, including for stimuli appearing at locations that cannot be foveated through head movements. This demonstrates that ECSA does not require programming either eye or head movements and calls for a re-examination of the oculomotor account. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSemantic associations between arithmetic and space: Evidence from temporal order judgements.
Andres, Michael; Salvaggio, Samuel; Lefèvre, Nathalie et al

in Memory & cognition (2020), 48(3), 361-369

Spatial biases associated with subtraction or addition problem solving are generally considered as reflecting leftward or rightward attention shifts along a mental numerical continuum, but an alternative ... [more ▼]

Spatial biases associated with subtraction or addition problem solving are generally considered as reflecting leftward or rightward attention shifts along a mental numerical continuum, but an alternative hypothesis not implying spatial attention proposes that the operator (plus or minus sign) may favour a response to one side of space (left or right) because of semantic associations. We tested these two accounts in a series of temporal order judgement experiments that consisted in the auditory presentation of addition or subtraction problems followed 200 ms (Experiments 1-2) or 800 ms (Experiment 3) later by the display of two lateralized targets in close temporal succession. To dissociate the side where the operation first brought their attention from the side they had to respond to, we asked participants to report which of the left or right target appeared first or last on screen. Under the attention-orienting account, addition should elicit more rightward responses than subtraction when participants have to focus on the first target, but more leftward responses when they have to focus on the last target, because the latter is opposite to the side where the operation first brought their attention. Under the semantic account, addition should elicit more rightward responses than subtraction, no matter the focus is on the first or last target, because participants should systematically favour the side conceptually linked to the operator. The results of the three experiments converge to indicate that, in lateralized target detection tasks, the spatial biases induced by arithmetic operations stem from semantic associations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpatial biases in mental arithmetic are independent of reading/writing habits: Evidence from French and Arabic speakers.
Masson, Nicolas UL; Andres, Michael; Alsamour, Marie et al

in Cognition (2020), 200

The representation of numbers in human adults is linked to space. In Western cultures, small and large numbers are associated respectively with the left and right sides of space. An influential framework ... [more ▼]

The representation of numbers in human adults is linked to space. In Western cultures, small and large numbers are associated respectively with the left and right sides of space. An influential framework attributes the emergence of these spatial-numerical associations (SNAs) to cultural factors such as the direction of reading and writing, because SNAs were found to be reduced or inverted in right-to-left readers/writers (e.g., Arabic, Farsi, or Hebrew speakers). However, recent cross-cultural and animal studies cast doubt on the determining role of reading and writing directions on SNAs. In this study, we assessed this role in mental arithmetic, which requires explicit number manipulations and has revealed robust leftward or rightward biases in Western participants. We used a temporal order judgement task in French and Arabic speakers, two languages that have opposite reading/writing directions. Participants had to solve subtraction and addition problems presented auditorily while at the same time determining which of a left or right visual target appeared first on a screen. The results showed that the right target was favoured more often when solving additions than when solving subtractions both in the French- (n = 31) and Arabic-speaking (n = 25) groups. This was true even in Arabic-speaking participants whose preference for ordering of various series of numerical and non-numerical stimuli went from right to left (n = 10). These results indicate that SNAs in mental arithmetic cannot be explained by the direction of reading/writing habits and call for a reconsideration of current models to acknowledge the pervasive role of biological factors in SNAs in adults. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 UL)
See detailA minority pulls the sample mean: on the individual prevalence of robust group-level cognitive phenomena - the instance of the SNARC effect
Cipora, Krzysztof; van Dijck, Jean-Philippe; Georges, Carrie UL et al

Presentation (2019, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCanonical finger numeral configurations are perceived holistically
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2014, April 04)

Sooner or later human beings represent or see numerosities represented by hands. This handling of small numerosities by prototypical finger configurations has been the focus of many experiments ... [more ▼]

Sooner or later human beings represent or see numerosities represented by hands. This handling of small numerosities by prototypical finger configurations has been the focus of many experiments investigating the possibility that semantic representations of numbers are motor-rooted. Canonical finger configurations (i.e. the culturally determined way to express numerosity with fingers) are for instance recognized faster (Di Luca et al., 2006), and give direct access to number semantics (Di Luca et Pesenti, 2008). It is also known that these effects are not due to a visual facilitation of canonical configurations (Di Luca et Pesenti, 2010), but to a different inner representation (Di Luca, Lefèvre and Pesenti, 2010). However, a precise characterization of their visual processing is currently lacking. We addressed this shortcoming by using an eye-tracking method based on gaze-contingent stimulus presentation (Van Belle et al., 2010). While participants named numerosities expressed by canonical and non-canonical finger numeral configurations presented in upright or inverted orientations, we selectively impaired analytical or holistic visual perception by respectively masking (in real time) peripheral or focal vision. Our data confirm the results found in literature: canonical configurations are processed faster than non-canonical ones, upright configurations are processed faster than inverted ones and holistic perception is faster than analytical one. Most importantly, we also demonstrate that canonical configurations are impaired by the peripheral mask (i.e. holistic vision hindered) whereas non-canonical ones are impaired by the foveal mask (i.e. analytical vision hindered). These results confirm that the practice of finger numeral configurations modifies not only the way human beings process and represent numerosities but especially the way to visually perceive them. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCanonical finger numeral configurations are perceived holistically
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2014)

Sooner or later human beings represent or see numerosities represented by hands. This handling of small numerosities by prototypical finger configurations has been the focus of many experiments ... [more ▼]

Sooner or later human beings represent or see numerosities represented by hands. This handling of small numerosities by prototypical finger configurations has been the focus of many experiments investigating the possibility that semantic representations of numbers are motor-rooted. Canonical finger configurations (i.e. the culturally determined way to express numerosity with fingers) are for instance recognized faster (Di Luca et al., 2006), and give direct access to number semantics (Di Luca et Pesenti, 2008). It is also known that these effects are not due to a visual facilitation of canonical configurations (Di Luca et Pesenti, 2010), but to a different inner representation (Di Luca, Lefèvre and Pesenti, 2010). However, a precise characterization of their visual processing is currently lacking. We addressed this shortcoming by using an eye-tracking method based on gaze-contingent stimulus presentation (Van Belle et al., 2010). While participants named numerosities expressed by canonical and non-canonical finger numeral configurations presented in upright or inverted orientations, we selectively impaired analytical or holistic visual perception by respectively masking (in real time) peripheral or focal vision. Our data confirm the results found in literature: canonical configurations are processed faster than non-canonical ones, upright configurations are processed faster than inverted ones and holistic perception is faster than analytical one. Most importantly, we also demonstrate that canonical configurations are impaired by the peripheral mask (i.e. holistic vision hindered) whereas non-canonical ones are impaired by the foveal mask (i.e. analytical vision hindered). These results confirm that the practice of finger numeral configurations modifies not only the way human beings process and represent numerosities but especially the way to visually perceive them. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNumbers reorient visuo-spatial attention during cancellation tasks
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro; Vallar, Giuseppe et al

in Experimental Brain Research (2013), 225(4), 549-57

Numbers induce shifts of spatial attention on the left or the right sides of external space as a function of their magnitude. However, whether this number-space association is restricted to the linear ... [more ▼]

Numbers induce shifts of spatial attention on the left or the right sides of external space as a function of their magnitude. However, whether this number-space association is restricted to the linear horizontal extensions, or extends to the whole visual scene, is still an open question. This study investigates, by means of a cancellation paradigm, the influence of numerical magnitude during scanning tasks in which participants freely explore complex visual scenes unconstrained towards either the horizontal or the vertical unidimensional axes. Five cancellation tasks were adapted in which Arabic digits were used as targets or distracters, in structured (lines and columns) or unstructured visual displays, with a smaller (2 or 3 types of distracters) or larger (10 or more types of distracters) sets of stimuli. Results show that the participants' hits distribution was a function of number magnitude: shifted on the left for small and on the right for large numbers. This effect was maximised when numerical cues were sparse, randomly arranged and, critically, irrelevant to the task. Overall, this study provides novel evidence from visuo-spatial exploratory cancellation tasks for an attentional shift induced by number magnitude. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFinger numeral representations: more than just another symbolic code
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2011), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlace and summation coding for canonical and non-canonical finger numeral representations
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Pesenti, Mauro

in Cognition (2010), 117(1), 95-100

Fingers can be used to express numerical magnitudes, and cultural habits about the fixed order in which fingers are raised determine which configurations become canonical and which non-canonical. Although ... [more ▼]

Fingers can be used to express numerical magnitudes, and cultural habits about the fixed order in which fingers are raised determine which configurations become canonical and which non-canonical. Although both types of configuration carry magnitude information, it has been shown that the canonical ones are recognized faster and directly linked to number semantics. Here we tested whether this difference is a consequence of differences in the qualitative way of processing the two types of configurations. When participants named Arabic digits (Experiment 1) or verbal numerals (Experiment 2) primed by canonical and non-canonical finger configurations, qualitatively different priming patterns were observed for the two types of configurations. Canonical configurations activated a place coding representation, with priming spreading to close smaller and larger magnitudes as a function of the prime-target distance. Conversely, non-canonical configurations activated a summation coding representation priming smaller and equal magnitudes independently of the prime-target distance, and larger targets depending on this distance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLet us redeploy attention to sensorimotor experience
Michaux, Nicholas; Pesenti, Mauro; Badets, Arnaud et al

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2010), 33(4), 283

With his massive redeployment hypothesis (MRH), Anderson claims that novel cognitive functions are likely to rely on pre-existing circuits already possessing suitable resources. Here, we put forward ... [more ▼]

With his massive redeployment hypothesis (MRH), Anderson claims that novel cognitive functions are likely to rely on pre-existing circuits already possessing suitable resources. Here, we put forward recent findings from studies in numerical cognition in order to show that the role of sensorimotor experience in the ontogenetical development of a new function has been largely underestimated in Anderson’s proposal. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAbsence of Low-Level Visual Difference Between Canonical and Noncanonical Finger-Numeral Configurations
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro

in Experimental Psychology (2010), 507(3), 202-07

Canonical finger numeral configurations are named faster than less familiar finger configurations and activate a semantic place-coding representation as symbolic stimuli. However, this does not exclude ... [more ▼]

Canonical finger numeral configurations are named faster than less familiar finger configurations and activate a semantic place-coding representation as symbolic stimuli. However, this does not exclude categorically the possibility that mere visuo-perceptual differences between canonical and noncanonical finger configurations may induce differences in processing speed. This study capitalizes on the fact that, in typical visual-detection tasks, participants focus on low-level visuo-perceptual features to detect a target among distractors sharing the same high-level semantic features, producing the so-called pop-out effect. Participants had to decide whether a canonical finger configuration was present among a set of distractors expressing the same numerosity in a noncanonical way. The results showed that the time needed to detect the presence of the target grew linearly with the number of distractors. This indicates that the canonical target enjoyed no perceptual saliency among the noncanonical configurations (i.e., no pop-out effect) excluding visuo-perceptual differences as the source of the better identification of and semantic access of canonical configurations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFinger counting: The missing tool?
Andres, Michael; Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2008), 31

Rips et al. claim that the principles underlying the structure of natural numbers cannot be inferred from interactions with the physical world. However, they failed to consider an important source of ... [more ▼]

Rips et al. claim that the principles underlying the structure of natural numbers cannot be inferred from interactions with the physical world. However, they failed to consider an important source of interaction: finger counting. Here, we show that finger counting satisfies all the conditions required for allowing the concept of numbers to emerge from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMasked priming effect with canonical finger numeral configurations
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Pesenti, Mauro

in Experimental Brain Research (2008), 185(1), 27-39

Discrete numerosities can be represented by various finger configurations. The impact of counting strategies on these configurations and their possible semantic status were investigated in young adults ... [more ▼]

Discrete numerosities can be represented by various finger configurations. The impact of counting strategies on these configurations and their possible semantic status were investigated in young adults. Experiment 1 showed that young adults named numerical finger configurations faster when they conformed to their own canonical finger-counting habits than when they did not. Experiment 2 showed that numeral finger configurations used as unconsciously presented primes speeded up numerical comparative judgements of Arabic numeral targets. Participants responded faster and made fewer errors with numerical than with non-numerical primes, and when primes and targets were congruent (i.e., leading to the same response). Moreover, this priming effect generalised to novel never consciously seen numerosities for canonical configurations but not for non-canonical ones. These results support the idea that canonical finger configurations automatically activate number semantics whereas non-canonical ones do not. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNumber magnitude potentiates action judgements
Badets, Arnaud; Andres, Michael; Di Luca, Samuel UL et al

in Experimental Brain Research (2007), 180(3), 525-34

Motor actions can be simulated and generated through the perception of objects and their characteristics. Such functional characteristics of objects with given action capabilities are called affordances ... [more ▼]

Motor actions can be simulated and generated through the perception of objects and their characteristics. Such functional characteristics of objects with given action capabilities are called affordances. Here we report an interaction between the perception of affordances and the processing of numerical magnitude, and we show that the numerical information calibrates the judgement of action even when no actual action is required. In Experiment 1, participants had to judge whether they would be able to grasp a rod lengthways between their thumb and index finger. The presentation of the rod was preceded by a number or a non-numerical symbol. When a small number preceded the rod, participants overestimated their grasp; conversely, when a large number preceded the rods, they underestimated their grasp. In Experiment 2, participants were requested to judge if two successive rods had the same length, a judgement that did not involve any grasping. The numerical primes had no effect on this judgement, showing that the magnitude/affordance interaction was not due to a simple perceptual effect. Finally, Experiment 3 showed that the interaction was not present with a non-numerical ordered sequence, thereby eliminating sequence order as a potentially confounding variable. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFinger-digit compatibility in Arabic numeral processing
Di Luca, Samuel UL; Granà, Alessia; Semenza, Carlo et al

in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology (2006), 59(9), 1648-63

Finger-digit response compatibility was tested by asking participants to identify Arabic digits by pressing one of ten keys with all ten fingers. The direction of the finger-digit mapping was varied by ... [more ▼]

Finger-digit response compatibility was tested by asking participants to identify Arabic digits by pressing one of ten keys with all ten fingers. The direction of the finger-digit mapping was varied by manipulating the global direction of the hand-digit mapping as well as the direction of the finger-digit mapping within each hand (in each case, from small to large digits, or the reverse). The hypothesis of a left-to-right mental number line predicted that a complete left-to-right mapping should be easier whereas the hypothesis of a representation based on finger counting predicted that a counting-congruent mapping should be easier. The results show that a mapping congruent with the prototypical finger-counting strategy reported by the participants leads to better performance than a mapping congruent with a left-to-right oriented mental number line, and demonstrate that finger-counting strategies clearly influence the way numerical information is mentally represented and processed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (0 UL)