References of "Pétré, Benoit"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocioeconomic and behavioural factors associated with access to and use of Personal Health Records
Paccoud, Ivana UL; Baumann, Michèle UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making (2021), 21

Background: Access to and use of digital technology are more common among people of higher socioeconomic status. These differences might be due to lack of interest, not having physical access or having ... [more ▼]

Background: Access to and use of digital technology are more common among people of higher socioeconomic status. These differences might be due to lack of interest, not having physical access or having lower intentions to use this technology. By integrating the digital divide approach and the User Acceptance of Information Technology (UTAUT) model, this study aims to further our understanding of socioeconomic factors and the mechanisms linked to different stages in the use of Personal Health Records (PHR): desire, intentions and physical access to PHR. Methods: A cross-sectional online and in-person survey was undertaken in the areas of Lorraine (France), Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland (Germany), and Wallonia (Belgium). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to group items derived from the UTAUT model. We applied linear and logistic regressions controlling for country-level heterogeneity, health and demographic factors. Results: A total of 829 individuals aged over 18 completed the questionnaire. Socioeconomic inequalities were present in the access to and use of PHR. Education and income played a significant role in individuals' desire to access their PHR. Being older than 65 years, and migrant, were negatively associated with desire to access PHR. An income gradient was found in having a physical access to PHR, while for the subgroup of respondents who expressed desire to have access, higher educational level was positively associated with intentions to regularly use PHR. In fully adjusted model testing the contribution of UTAUT-derived factors, individuals who perceived PHRs to be useful and had the necessary digital skills were more inclined to use their PHR regularly. Social influence, support and lack of anxiety in using technology were strong predictors of regular PHR use. Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of considering all stages in PHR use: desire to access, physical access and intention to regularly use PHRs, while paying special attention to migrants and people with lower socioeconomic backgrounds who may feel financial constraints and are not able to exploit the potential of PHRs. As PHR use is expected to come with health benefits, facilitating access and regular use for those less inclined could reduce health inequalities and advance health equity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe patients’ perspective on access to and use of Personal Health Records
Paccoud, Ivana UL; Baumann, Michèle UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, October 29)

We present the patients' perspective regarding the use of Personal Health Records, and give insights on patients' characteristics, such as socioeconomic and behavioural factors, that are associated with ... [more ▼]

We present the patients' perspective regarding the use of Personal Health Records, and give insights on patients' characteristics, such as socioeconomic and behavioural factors, that are associated with the access to and use of Personal Health Records. The findings come from the INTERREG APPS project that investigated preferences for and intention to use Personal Health Records in four cross-border regions, in Lorraine/France, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland/Germany, and Wallonia/Belgium. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCore Values that Influence the Patient—Healthcare Professional Power Dynamic: Steering Interaction towards Partnership
Odero, Angela UL; Pongy, Manon UL; Chauvel, Louis UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 7(8458),

Healthcare has long been marked by the authoritative-physician–passive-patient interaction, with patients seeking help and physicians seeking to restore patients back to health. However, lobalisation ... [more ▼]

Healthcare has long been marked by the authoritative-physician–passive-patient interaction, with patients seeking help and physicians seeking to restore patients back to health. However, lobalisation, social movements, and technological advancements are transforming the nature of this relationship. We aim to identify core values that influence the power dynamic betweenpatients and healthcare professionals, and determine how to steer these interactions towards partnership, a more suitable approach to current healthcare needs. Patients with physical chronic diseases (10 men, 18 women) and healthcare professionals (11 men, 12 women) were interviewed, sessions transcribed, and the framework method used to thematically analyse the data. Validation was done through analyst triangulation and member check recheck. Core values identified as influencing the patient-healthcare professional power dynamic include: (A) values that empower patients (acceptance of diagnosis and autonomy); (B) values unique to healthcare professionals (HCPs) (acknowledging patients experiential knowledge and including patients in the therapeutic process); and (C) shared capitals related to their interactions (communication, information sharing and exchange, collaboration, and mutual commitment). These interdependent core values can be considered prerequisites to the implementation of the patient-as-partner approach in healthcare. Partnership would imply a paradigm shift such that stakeholders systematically examine each other’s perspective, motivations, capabilities, and goals, and then adapt their interactions in this accord, for optimal outcome. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (19 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHospital practices for the implementation of patient partnership in a multi-national European region
Scholtes, Beatrice; Breinbauer, Mareike; Voyen, Madeline et al

in European Journal of Public Health (2020)

The extent to which patients are involved in their care can be influenced by hospital policies and interventions. Nevertheless, the implementation of patient participation and involvement (PPI) at the ... [more ▼]

The extent to which patients are involved in their care can be influenced by hospital policies and interventions. Nevertheless, the implementation of patient participation and involvement (PPI) at the organisational (meso) level has rarely been assessed systematically. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of PPI practises in hospitals in Belgium, France, Germany and Luxembourg and to analyze if, and to what extent, the hospital vision and the presence of a patient committee influence the implementation of PPI practises. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out using an online questionnaire in hospitals in the border regions of the four countries. The data were analyzed for differences between regions and the maturity of PPI development. Results: Full responses were obtained from 64 hospitals. A wide range of practices were observed, the degree of maturity was mixed. A majority of hospitals promoted patient partnership in the hospital's philosophy of care statement. However, the implementation of specific interventions for PPI was not found uniformly and differences could be observed between the countries. Conclusions: Hospitals in the region seem to be motivated to include patients more fully, however, implementation of PPI interventions seems incomplete and only partially integrated into the general functioning of the hospitals. The implementation of the concept seems to be more mature in the francophone part of the region perhaps due, in part, to a more favourable political context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail“Patient participation” and related concepts: A scoping review on their dimensional
Ortiz Halabi, Iness; Scholtes, Beatrice; Voz, Berarrd et al

in Patient Education and Counseling (2019)

Several concepts on collaboration between patients and healthcare systems have emerged in the literature but there is little consensus on their meanings and differences. In this study, “patient ... [more ▼]

Several concepts on collaboration between patients and healthcare systems have emerged in the literature but there is little consensus on their meanings and differences. In this study, “patient participation” and related concepts were studied by focusing on the dimensions that compose them. This review follows two objectives: (1) to produce a detailed and comprehensive overview of the “patient participation” dimensions; (2) to identify differences and similarities between the related concepts. Methods; A scoping review was performed to synthesize knowledge into a conceptual framework. An electronic protocol driven search was conducted in two bibliographic databases and a thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. The search process returned 39 articles after exclusion for full data extraction and analysis. Through the thematic analysis, the dimensions, influencing factors and expected outcomes of “patient participation” were determined. Finally, differences between the included concepts were identified. Conclusion. This global vision of “patient participation” allows us to go beyond the distinctions between the existing concepts and reveals their common goal to include the patient in the healthcare system. Practice implications. This scoping review provides useful information to propose a conceptual model of “patient participation”, which could impact clinical practice and medical training programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (13 UL)