References of "Osmer, Christian"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychological preparation and postoperative outcomes for adults undergoing surgery under general anaesthesia
Powell, Rachael; Scott, Neal; Manyande, Anne et al

in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online) (2016), (5), 1-279

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative ... [more ▼]

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Since this review, more detailed bibliographic searching has become possible, additional studies testing psychological preparation for surgery have been completed and hospital procedures have changed. The present review examines whether psychological preparation (procedural information, sensory information, cognitive intervention, relaxation, hypnosis and emotion-focused intervention) has impact on the outcomes of postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials of adult participants (aged 16 or older) undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia. We excluded studies focusing on patient groups with clinically diagnosed psychological morbidity. We did not limit the search by language or publication status. We included studies testing a preoperative psychological intervention that included at least one of these seven techniques: procedural information; sensory information; behavioural instruction; cognitive intervention; relaxation techniques; hypnosis; emotion-focused intervention. We included studies that examined any one of our postoperative outcome measures (pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay, negative affect) within one month post-surgery. Data collection and analysis One author checked titles and abstracts to exclude obviously irrelevant studies. We obtained full reports of apparently relevant studies; two authors fully screened these. Two authors independently extracted data and resolved discrepancies by discussion. Where possible we used random-effects meta-analyses to combine the results from individual studies. For length of stay we pooled mean differences. For pain and negative affect we used a standardized effect size (the standardized mean difference (SMD), or Hedges’ g) to combine data from different outcome measures. If data were not available in a form suitable for meta-analysis we performed a narrative review. Main results Searches identified 5116 unique papers; we retrieved 827 for full screening. In this review, we included 105 studies from 115 papers, in which 10,302 participants were randomized. Mainly as a result of updating the search in July 2015, 38 papers are awaiting classification. Sixty-one of the 105 studies measured the outcome pain, 14 behavioural recovery, 58 length of stay and 49 negative affect. Participants underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, and a range of psychological components were used in interventions, frequently in combination. In the 105 studies, appropriate datawere provided for themeta-analysis of 38 studiesmeasuring the outcome postoperative pain (2713 participants), 36 for length of stay (3313 participants) and 31 for negative affect (2496 participants). We narratively reviewed the remaining studies (including the 14 studies with 1441 participants addressing behavioural recovery). When pooling the results for all types of intervention there was low quality evidence that psychological preparation techniques were associated with lower postoperative pain (SMD -0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.35 to -0.06), length of stay (mean difference -0.52 days, 95% CI - 0.82 to -0.22) and negative affect (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.54 to -0.16) compared with controls. Results tended to be similar for all categories of intervention, although there was no evidence that behavioural instruction reduced the outcome pain. However, caution must be exercised when interpreting the results because of heterogeneity in the types of surgery, interventions and outcomes. Narratively reviewed evidence for the outcome behavioural recovery provided very low quality evidence that psychological preparation, in particular behavioural instruction, may have potential to improve behavioural recovery outcomes, but no clear conclusions could be reached. Generally, the evidence suffered from poor reporting, meaning that few studies could be classified as having low risk of bias. Overall,we rated the quality of evidence for each outcome as ‘low’ because of the high level of heterogeneity in meta-analysed studies and the unclear risk of bias. In addition, for the outcome behavioural recovery, too few studies used robust measures and reported suitable data for meta-analysis, so we rated the quality of evidence as ’very low’. Authors’ conclusions The evidence suggested that psychological preparation may be beneficial for the outcomes postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, negative affect and length of stay, and is unlikely to be harmful. However, at present, the strength of evidence is insufficient to reach firm conclusions on the role of psychological preparation for surgery. Further analyses are needed to explore the heterogeneity in the data, to identify more specifically when intervention techniques are of benefit. As the current evidence quality is low or very low, there is a need for well-conducted and clearly reported research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular effects of Org 9487 under isoflurane anaesthesia in man
Osmer, Christian; Wulf, Kay; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in European Journal of Anaesthesiology (1998), (15), 585-589

The cardiovascular effects of Org 9487 during isoflurane anaesthesia have been evaluated using three doses around its ED90 for neuromuscular blockade, i.e. 1 mg kg-1, 2 mg kg-1 and 3 mg kg-1. Heart rate ... [more ▼]

The cardiovascular effects of Org 9487 during isoflurane anaesthesia have been evaluated using three doses around its ED90 for neuromuscular blockade, i.e. 1 mg kg-1, 2 mg kg-1 and 3 mg kg-1. Heart rate increased to 110%, 115% and 118% in patients receiving 1 mg kg-1, 2 mg kg-1 and 3 mg kg-1 respectively. There were no significant effects on systolic and diastolic blood pressures for the two lower dose groups. Patients receiving Org 9487 3 mg kg-1 displayed significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures (91% and 82% of the control values respectively). Except for heart rate in the group receiving 3 mg kg-1, all measurements returned to baseline after a maximum of 15 min. Six patients experienced a transient increase in airway pressure after administration of Org 9487, which was accompanied by a decrease in oxygen saturation in two out of six subjects, but there was no audible wheezing. These episodes were self-limiting and required no treatment. There were no other adverse reactions to this drug during this study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparative use of muscle relaxants and their reversal in three European countries: a survey in France, Germany and Great Britain
Osmer, Christian; Vögele, Claus UL; Zickmann, Bernfried et al

in European Journal of Anaesthesiology (1996), 13

A survey was conducted among British, French and German anaesthetists to evaluate possible national differences in the peri-operative use of muscle relaxants and their reversal agents. The same non ... [more ▼]

A survey was conducted among British, French and German anaesthetists to evaluate possible national differences in the peri-operative use of muscle relaxants and their reversal agents. The same non-depolarizing relaxants are used in all three countries, with the exception of d-tubocurarine, which is only available in Great Britain, and alcuronium which is mainly used in Germany. The French anaesthetists seem to use significantly less succinylcholine than their peers in Great Britain or Germany for both elective and emergency intubation. Monitoring of neuromuscular blockade still relies mainly on "clinical judgement'. Reversal of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants is performed routinely in Great Britain, while a substantial number of French anaesthetists avoid the use of a reversal. Dose regimes for neostigmine vary largely, with German anaesthetists administering the lowest, and British anaesthetists administering the highest doses. Side effects of reversal agents are reported by colleagues from all three countries in too high a percentage to justify uncritical administration of these drugs. In Germany there seems to be a noteworthy lack of recovery facilities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (0 UL)