References of "Nothnagel, Michael"
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See detailGuideline-based and bioinformatic reassessment of lesion-associated gene and variant pathogenicity in focal human epilepsies
Niestroj, Lisa-Marie; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Nothnagel, Michael et al

in Epilepsia (2018)

Objective: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from patients with focal epilepsy and Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) or low-grade glio-neuronal tumors has fostered large-scale ... [more ▼]

Objective: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from patients with focal epilepsy and Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) or low-grade glio-neuronal tumors has fostered large-scale genetic examination. However, assessment of pathogenicity of germline and somatic variants remains difficult. Here, we present a state of the art evaluation of reported genes and variants associated with epileptic brain lesions. Methods: We critically re-evaluated the pathogenicity for all neuropathology-associated variants reported to date in PubMed and ClinVar databases including 101 neuropathology-associated missense variants encompassing 11 disease-related genes. We assessed gene variant tolerance and classified all identified missense variants according to guidelines from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). We further extended the bioinformatic variant prediction by introducing a novel gene-specific deleteriousness ranking for prediction scores. Results: Application of ACMG guidelines and in silico gene variant tolerance analysis classified only seven out of 11 genes to be likely disease-associated according to the reported a disease mechanism, while 61 (60.4%) of 101 variants of those genes were classified as of uncertain significance (VUS), 37 (36.6%) as being likely pathogenic (LP) and 3 (3%) as being pathogenic (P). Significance: We concluded that the majority of neuropathology-associated variants reported to date do not have enough evidence to be classified as pathogenic. Interpretation of lesion-associated variants remains challenging and application of current ACMG guidelines is recommended for interpretation and prediction. [less ▲]

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See detailRare coding variants in genes encoding GABAA receptors in genetic generalised epilepsies: an exome-based case-control study
May, Patrick UL; Girard, Simon; Harrer, Merle et al

in Lancet Neurology (2018), 17(8), 699-708

Background Genetic generalised epilepsy is the most common type of inherited epilepsy. Despite a high concordance rate of 80% in monozygotic twins, the genetic background is still poorly understood. We ... [more ▼]

Background Genetic generalised epilepsy is the most common type of inherited epilepsy. Despite a high concordance rate of 80% in monozygotic twins, the genetic background is still poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the burden of rare genetic variants in genetic generalised epilepsy. Methods For this exome-based case-control study, we used three different genetic generalised epilepsy case cohorts and three independent control cohorts, all of European descent. Cases included in the study were clinically evaluated for genetic generalised epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing was done for the discovery case cohort, a validation case cohort, and two independent control cohorts. The replication case cohort underwent targeted next-generation sequencing of the 19 known genes encoding subunits of GABAA receptors and was compared to the respective GABAA receptor variants of a third independent control cohort. Functional investigations were done with automated two-microelectrode voltage clamping in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Findings Statistical comparison of 152 familial index cases with genetic generalised epilepsy in the discovery cohort to 549 ethnically matched controls suggested an enrichment of rare missense (Nonsyn) variants in the ensemble of 19 genes encoding GABAA receptors in cases (odds ratio [OR] 2·40 [95% CI 1·41–4·10]; pNonsyn=0·0014, adjusted pNonsyn=0·019). Enrichment for these genes was validated in a whole-exome sequencing cohort of 357 sporadic and familial genetic generalised epilepsy cases and 1485 independent controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·05–2·03]; pNonsyn=0·0081, adjusted pNonsyn=0·016). Comparison of genes encoding GABAA receptors in the independent replication cohort of 583 familial and sporadic genetic generalised epilepsy index cases, based on candidate-gene panel sequencing, with a third independent control cohort of 635 controls confirmed the overall enrichment of rare missense variants for 15 GABAA receptor genes in cases compared with controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·02–2·08]; pNonsyn=0·013, adjusted pNonsyn=0·027). Functional studies for two selected genes (GABRB2 and GABRA5) showed significant loss-of-function effects with reduced current amplitudes in four of seven tested variants compared with wild-type receptors. Interpretation Functionally relevant variants in genes encoding GABAA receptor subunits constitute a significant risk factor for genetic generalised epilepsy. Examination of the role of specific gene groups and pathways can disentangle the complex genetic architecture of genetic generalised epilepsy. [less ▲]

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See detailExome-wide analysis of mutational burden in patients with typical and atypical Rolandic Epilepsy
Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy UL; Lal, Dennis; May, Patrick UL et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2018)

Rolandic Epilepsy (RE) is the most common focal epilepsy in childhood. To date no hypothesis-free exome-wide mutational screen has been conducted for RE and Atypical RE (ARE). Here we report on whole ... [more ▼]

Rolandic Epilepsy (RE) is the most common focal epilepsy in childhood. To date no hypothesis-free exome-wide mutational screen has been conducted for RE and Atypical RE (ARE). Here we report on whole-exome sequencing of 194 unrelated patients with RE/ARE and 567 ethnically matched population controls. We identified an exome-wide significantly enriched burden for deleterious and loss-of-function variants only for the established RE/ARE gene GRIN2A. The statistical significance of the enrichment disappeared after removing ARE patients. For several disease-related gene-sets, an odds ratio > 1 was detected for loss-of-function variants. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and pathogenicity assessment of neuropathology-associated gene variants
Neupert, Lisa-Marie; May, Patrick UL; Kobow, Katja et al

in Epilepsia (2017, December 08), 58(Suppl.5), 174

Germline and brain-specific somatic variants have been reported as an underlying cause in patients with epilepsy-associated neuropathologies, including focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) and long-term ... [more ▼]

Germline and brain-specific somatic variants have been reported as an underlying cause in patients with epilepsy-associated neuropathologies, including focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) and long-term epilepsy associated tumors (LEAT). However, evaluation of identified neuropathology associated variants in genetic screens is complex since not all observed variants contribute to the etiology of neuropathologies not even in genuinely disease-associated genes. Here, we critically reevaluated the pathogenicity of 12 previously published disease-related genes and of 79 neuropathology-associated missense variants listed in the PubMed and ClinVar databases. We (1) assessed the evolutionary gene constraint using the pLI and the missense z score, (2) used the latest American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) guidelines, and (3) performed bioinformatic variant pathogenicity prediction analyses using PolyPhen-2, CADD and GERP. Constraint analysis classified only seven out of 12 genes to be likely disease-associated. Furthermore, 78 (89%) of 88 neuropathology-associated missense variants were classified as being of unknown significance (VUS) and only 10 (11%) as being likely pathogenic (LPII). Pathogenicity prediction yielded a discrimination between LPII variants and a discrimination for VUS compared with rare variant scores from individuals present in the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD). In summary, our results demonstrate that interpretation of variants associated with neuropathologies is complex while the application of current ACMG guidelines including bioinformatic pathogenicity prediction can help improving variant evaluation. Furthermore, we will augment this set of literature-identified variants at the conference by results from our variant screen using self-generated deep sequencing data in >150 candidate genes in >50 patients not yet analyzed. [less ▲]

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See detailReassessment Of Lesion-Associated Gene And Variant Pathogenicity In Focal Human Epilepsies
Neupert, Lisa Marie; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Purpose: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from Focal Cortical Dysplasia and low-grade epilepsy-associated tumor patients fostered large-scale genetic examination. However ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from Focal Cortical Dysplasia and low-grade epilepsy-associated tumor patients fostered large-scale genetic examination. However, assessment of germline and somatic variant pathogenicity remains difficult. Methods: Here, we critically reevaluated the pathogenicity for all neuropathology-associated variants reported to date in the PubMed and ClinVar databases, including 12 disease-related genes and 88 neuropathology-associated missense variants. We (1) assessed evolutionary gene constraint using the pLI and missense z scores, (2) applied guidelines by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), and (3) predicted pathogenicity by using PolyPhen-2, CADD, and GERP. Results: Constraint analysis classified only seven out of 12 genes to be likely disease-associated, while 35 (40\%) of those 88 variants were classified as being variants of unknown significance (VUS) and 53 (60\%) as being likely pathogenic (LPII). Pathogenicity prediction yielded discrimination between neuropathology-associated variants (LPII and VUS) and rare variant scores obtained from individuals present in the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD). Conclusion: We conclude that several VUS are likely disease-associated and will be reclassified by future molecular evidence. In summary, interpretation of lesion-associated gene variants remains complex while the application of current ACMG guidelines including bioinformatic pathogenicity prediction will help improving interpretation and prediction. [less ▲]

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See detailDe novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy
Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Riesch, Erik et al

in Nature Genetics (2015), 47(4), 393-9

Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1–6. Using next ... [more ▼]

Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1–6. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild to moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons. [less ▲]

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