References of "Nothen, Markus M."
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See detailClinically relevant combined effect of polygenic background, rare pathogenic germline variants, and family history on colorectal cancer incidence 2022.01.20.22269585
Hassanin, Emadeldin; Spier, Isabel; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2022)

Background and aims: Summarised in polygenic risk scores (PRS), the effect of common, low penetrant genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), can be used for risk stratification.Methods To ... [more ▼]

Background and aims: Summarised in polygenic risk scores (PRS), the effect of common, low penetrant genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), can be used for risk stratification.Methods To assess the combined impact of the PRS and other main factors on CRC risk, 163,516 individuals from the UK Biobank were stratified as follows: 1. carriers status for germline pathogenic variants (PV) in CRC susceptibility genes (APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2), 2. low (<20%), intermediate (20-80%), or high PRS (>80\%), and 3. family history (FH) of CRC. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were applied to compare odds ratios (OR) and to compute the lifetime incidence, respectively. Results: Depending on the PRS, the CRC lifetime incidence for non-carriers ranges between 6 and 22\%, compared to 40 and 74 for carriers. A suspicious FH is associated with a further increase of the cumulative incidence reaching 26 for non-carriers and 98 for carriers. In non-carriers without FH, but high PRS, the CRC risk is doubled, whereas a low PRS even in the context of a FH results in a decreased risk. The full model including PRS, carrier status, and FH improved the area under the curve (AUC) in risk prediction (0.704). Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that CRC risks are strongly influenced by the PRS for both a sporadic and monogenic background. FH, PV, and common variants complementary contribute to CRC risk. The implementation of PRS in routine care will likely improve personalized risk stratification, which will in turn guide tailored preventive surveillance strategies in high, intermediate, and low risk groups. [less ▲]

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See detailBreast and prostate cancer risk: the interplay of polygenic risk, rare pathogenic germline variants, and family history
Hassanin, Emadeldin; May, Patrick UL; Aldisi, Rana et al

in Genetics in Medicine (2021)

Purpose Investigate to which extent polygenic risk scores (PRS), pathogenic or likely rare pathogenic germline variants (PV), and family history jointly influence breast and prostate cancer risk. Methods ... [more ▼]

Purpose Investigate to which extent polygenic risk scores (PRS), pathogenic or likely rare pathogenic germline variants (PV), and family history jointly influence breast and prostate cancer risk. Methods 200,643 individuals from the UK Biobank were stratified as follows: 1. Heterozygotes or non-heterozygotes of PV in moderate to high cancer risk genes, 2. PRS strata, 3. with or without a family history of cancer. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the odds ratio (OR) across groups and the cumulative incidence through life. Results Cumulative incidence by age 70 among non-heterozygotes across PRS strata ranged from 9% to 32% and from 9% to 35% for breast and prostate cancer, respectively. Among PV heterozygotes it ranged from 20% to 48% in moderate-risk genes and from 51% to 74% in high-risk genes for breast cancer, and it ranged from 30% to 59% in prostate cancer risk genes. Family history is always associated with an increased cancer OR. Conclusion PRS provides a meaningful risk gradient leading alone to a cancer risk comparable to PV in moderate risk genes while acting as risk modifier for high-risk genes. Including family history beside PV and PRS further improves cancer risk stratification. [less ▲]

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See detailBreast and prostate cancer risk: the interplay of polygenic risk, high-impact monogenic variants, and family history 2021.06.04.21258277
Hassanin, Emadeldin; May, Patrick UL; Aldisi, Rana et al

E-print/Working paper (2021)

Purpose: Investigate to which extent polygenic risk scores (PRS), high-impact monogenic variants, and family history affect breast and prostate cancer risk by assessing cancer prevalence and cancer ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Investigate to which extent polygenic risk scores (PRS), high-impact monogenic variants, and family history affect breast and prostate cancer risk by assessing cancer prevalence and cancer cumulative lifetime incidence. Methods 200,643 individuals from the UK Biobank were stratified as follows: 1. carriers or non-carriers of high impact constitutive, monogenic variants in cancer susceptibility genes, 2. high or non-high PRS (90th percentile threshold), 3. with or without a family history of cancer. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the odds ratio (OR) across the different groups while Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the cumulative incidence through life. Results Breast and prostate cancer cumulative incidence by age 70 is 7 and 5 for non-carriers with non-high PRS and reaches 37 and 32 among carriers of high-impact variants in cancer susceptibility genes with high PRS. The additional presence of family history is associated with a further increase of the risk of developing cancer reaching an OR of 14 and 21 for breast and prostate cancer, respectively. Conclusion: High PRS confers a cancer risk comparable to high-impact monogenic variants. Family history, monogenic variants, and PRS contribute additively to breast and prostate cancer risk. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic meta-analysis of diagnosed Alzheimer's disease identifies new risk loci and implicates Aβ, tau, immunity and lipid processing
Kunkle, Brian W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Sims, Rebecca et al

in Nature Genetics (2019), 51(3), 414

Risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the most prevalent dementia, is partially driven by genetics. To identify LOAD risk loci, we performed a large genome-wide association meta-analysis of ... [more ▼]

Risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the most prevalent dementia, is partially driven by genetics. To identify LOAD risk loci, we performed a large genome-wide association meta-analysis of clinically diagnosed LOAD (94,437 individuals). We confirm 20 previous LOAD risk loci and identify five new genome-wide loci (IQCK, ACE, ADAM10, ADAMTS1, and WWOX), two of which (ADAM10, ACE) were identified in a recent genome-wide association (GWAS)-by-familial-proxy of Alzheimer's or dementia. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region confirms the neurological and immune-mediated disease haplotype HLA-DR15 as a risk factor for LOAD. Pathway analysis implicates immunity, lipid metabolism, tau binding proteins, and amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism, showing that genetic variants affecting APP and A$\beta$ processing are associated not only with early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease but also with LOAD. Analyses of risk genes and pathways show enrichment for rare variants (P = 1.32 × 10−7), indicating that additional rare variants remain to be identified. We also identify important genetic correlations between LOAD and traits such as family history of dementia and education. [less ▲]

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See detailRare coding variants in PLCG2, ABI3, and TREM2 implicate microglial-mediated innate immunity in Alzheimer's disease
Sims, Rebecca; van der Lee, Sven J.; Naj, Adam C. et al

in Nature Genetics (2017), 49

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See detailGene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.
Escott-Price, Valentina; Bellenguez, Celine; Wang, Li-San et al

in PloS one (2014), 9(6), 94661

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4x10-6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9x10-8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. SIGNIFICANCE: The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. [less ▲]

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See detailMeta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease
Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Harold, Denise et al

in Nature Genetics (2013), 45

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