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See detailAuswirkungen der Grenzschließungen auf die systemrelevanten Arbeitskräfte und den grenzüberschreitenden Arbeitsmarkt in der Großregion während der Covid-19-Pandemie
Nienaber, Birte UL; Funk, Ines; Dörrenbächer, H. Peter et al

in Brodowski, Dominik; Nesselhauf, Jonas; Weber, Florian (Eds.) Pandemisches Virus - nationales Handeln (in press)

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the ... [more ▼]

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the health, rescue and industrial sectors were at the centre of the debate about a lack of solidarity between the different border regions and countries. This article analyses the impact of border closures on different aspects of solidarity in the Greater Region, the border region with the highest number of cross-border workers in Europe. Solidarity as a European value has been put to the test - both between countries (e.g. through the 'theft' of key labour and border controls making cross-border mobility almost impossible) and between different groups of workers, such as teleworkers and non-teleworkers, as well as between cross-border commuters and non-cross-border commuters, who have been treated differently, for example through short-time working schemes (e.g. in the health sector). [less ▲]

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See detailResearch note: Ukrainian Refugee Crisis Tests Luxembourg’s Humanitarian and Integration Policy
Beine, Michel UL; Doquier, Frédéric; Machado, Jöel et al

Diverse speeches and writings (2022)

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the resulting sanctions have contributed to accelerating the rise in commodity prices (including energy), triggering inflation, and exacerbating instability in an already ... [more ▼]

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the resulting sanctions have contributed to accelerating the rise in commodity prices (including energy), triggering inflation, and exacerbating instability in an already convalescent Europe. The war has also sparked a massive refugee crisis, the most impressive in speed and size since World War II, whose economic impact is likely to be significant. As of mid-May, the stock of Ukrainian refugees who have fled their country due to the Russian invasion slightly exceeded 6 million, and some 8 million more were displaced internally.1 This refugee crisis imposes huge stress on the humanitarian protection regime and reception capacity of most European countries. This is not only the case in frontline countries such as Poland (3.3 million), Romania (0.9 million), Hungary (0.6 million) or Moldova (0.5 million), but also in other EU member states where the numbers of arrivals has almost reached (and sometimes exceeds) the levels of the 2015-16 refugee crisis in two months only. As of early May, the stocks have risen to 610 thousand in Germany, 70 thousand in France, 40 thousand in Belgium and 5 thousand in Luxembourg. These numbers are likely to grow in the coming weeks, as the war is far from over. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnual Report on Migration and Asylum 2021 – Luxembourg
Holzapfel, Nicole UL; Mellinger, Lukas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum presents the statistical trends and developments in migration, asylum and integration, changes in legislation or policies, and it traces significant national ... [more ▼]

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum presents the statistical trends and developments in migration, asylum and integration, changes in legislation or policies, and it traces significant national debates, which occurred in Luxembourg during the year 2021. Several of the most notable changes and debates in Luxembourg during the year of 2021 were of legislative nature: The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law entered into force on 5 July 2021. This law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain provisions relating to intra-corporate transferees, trainees and family reunification. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Asylum Law entered into force on 5 July 2021. This law modifies the remedies available to applicants for international protection (AIPs). It increases their effectiveness and guarantees maximum legal certainty in the context of transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as well as in the case of final decisions to close proceedings on an application for international protection and of decisions to withdraw international protection. Bill 7844 was introduced to Parliament on 15 June 2021 to amend the amended Law of 8 March 2017 on Luxembourgish Nationality (hereinafter Nationality Law) and entered into force on 22 August as the Law of 30 July 2021. According to the Nationality Law, a candidate (a direct line descendant of a Luxembourg ancestor) for the recovery of Luxembourgish nationality must start to (re)claim her/his Luxembourg nationality before the registrar before 31 December 2022. In 2021, three noteworthy bills were introduced to parliament with their legislative procedure still ongoing at the time of writing.On 2 September 2021, the government introduced to Parliament Bill 7877, intending to amend the amended Electoral Law of 18 February 2003, hereinafter the Electoral Law. This bill intends to support political participation of the steadily growing number of non-Luxembourgish residents and it foresees the abolishment of the 5-year residency clause on active and passive voting rights for EU- and non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg. Further, the date of closure for the registration on the electoral list before the elections for non-Luxembourg citizens to register on the municipal electoral rolls would be reduced from 87 days to 55 days. On 26 November 2021, the Government Council approved a bill proposing to amend the Immigration Law. This bill aims to ensure a more effective management of the removal of third-country nationals illegally residing on the territory by structuring the different categories of removal measures (mesures d’éloignement) in a clear and coherent way. On 19 January 2022 this bill was introduced to Parliament as Bill 7954. Bill 7881 on the exchange of information relating to nationals of countries outside the European Union as well as the European Criminal Records Information System (ECRIS) was introduced to Parliament on 10 September 2021. This system will make it possible to search for entries in the criminal records of third-country nationals against which court decisions have been issued by the criminal courts of other EU Member States. Several developments occurred with respect to integration in 2021. As already noted in the 2020 Annual Report on Migration and Asylum of the EMN Luxembourg, the Government plans to reform the amended Law of 16 December 2008 on the reception and integration of foreigners. Initial accompanying consultations have already been solicited in 2020 and this process continued in 2021. Multiple consultations with stakeholders from civil society, social partners and the municipalities took place and, in this context, the OECD-study “Towards a successful integration process: The functioning of the integration system and its actors in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg” was published on 25 November 2021. At the beginning of 2021, the Pact of Living Together (Pakt vum Zesummeliewen – PvZ) replaced the Communal Integration Plan (PCI) to create a more dynamic and multi-year integration process for a stronger inclusion of Luxembourg’s municipalities. Continuing education for Luxembourg residents has been made more accessible and additional courses, which are tailored to AIPs and beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs), have been included into the training portfolio of the Adult Education Service (SFA). Luxembourg has initiated the planning process of extending its current public health care system. It is foreseen to offer vulnerable population groups, who have not been covered to date, low-threshold easy access to health care. Further, Luxembourg has been reacting on the changing situation in Afghanistan since the takeover of power by the Taliban in August 2021. Luxembourg has halted decisions on applications for international protection by Afghans until sufficient reliable information will be available. Between the takeover of power through the Taliban in August until the end of 2021, 71 Afghan nationals have been granted international protection. This includes 45 Afghan nationals evacuated from Afghanistan. Luxembourg has further committed to resettle additional people. While the year 2021 continued to be marked by the COVID-19 pandemic, several important developments, such as the availability of vaccines and rapid tests, did redirect pandemic activity on to different paths than in 2020. The focus lay on testing as well as on getting everyone in Luxembourg, including AIPs and persons in a situation of irregular stay, vaccinated. Yet, Luxembourg’s only external border, that is Luxembourg’s international airport, remained closed for third-country nationals. Luxembourg’s entry regulations, which were adjusted multiple times and in a dynamic fashion in line with the evolution of the pandemic, however, created several exemptions that allowed for the entry of certain third-country nationals. As of 22 December 2021, this border closure was extended from 31 December 2021 to 31 March 2022 by means of Grand Ducal Regulation. For more information, please consult the attached report. [less ▲]

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See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile 2021 – Luxembourg
Mellinger, Lukas UL; Holzapfel-Mantin, Nicole UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

Ce rapport décrit les tendances statistiques en matière de migration, d’asile et d’intégration, les changements législatifs ou politiques et retrace les débats nationaux importants qui ont eu lieu au ... [more ▼]

Ce rapport décrit les tendances statistiques en matière de migration, d’asile et d’intégration, les changements législatifs ou politiques et retrace les débats nationaux importants qui ont eu lieu au Luxembourg au cours de l’année 2021. Les principaux changements et débats au cours de l'année 2021 étaient de nature législative ; en particulier deux lois ont été adoptées : La loi du 16 juin 2021 modifiant la loi sur l'immigration est entrée en vigueur le 5 juillet 2021. Cette loi modifie la loi sur l'immigration, en allégeant la charge administrative pour les ressortissants de pays tiers, et en modifiant certaines dispositions relatives aux travailleurs transférés intragroupe, aux stagiaires et au regroupement familial. La loi du 16 juin 2021 modifiant la loi sur l'asile est entrée en vigueur le 5 juillet 2021. Cette loi modifie les voies de recours à disposition des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI). Elle renforce leur efficacité et garantit une sécurité juridique maximale dans le cadre des transferts sous le règlement Dublin, des décisions définitives de clôture de la procédure relative à une demande de protection internationale et des décisions de retrait de la protection internationale. Par ailleurs, la loi du 30 juillet 2021 portant modification de la loi modifiée du 8 mars 2017 sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise (ci-après loi sur la nationalité) est entré en vigueur le 22 août 2021. Selon cette loi, un candidat (descendant en ligne directe d'un ancêtre luxembourgeois) au recouvrement de la nationalité luxembourgeoise doit signer la déclaration de recouvrement de la nationalité luxembourgeoise auprès de l'officier d'état civil avant le 31 décembre 2022. En 2021, trois projets de loi concernant divers volets des politiques d’intégration ou d’immigration ont été déposés à la Chambre des Députés ; la procédure législative de ces trois projets étant toujours en cours au moment de la rédaction du présent rapport. Le 2 septembre 2021, le gouvernement a déposé à la Chambre des Députés le projet de loi n°7877, visant à modifier la loi électorale modifiée du 18 février 2003 (ci-après la loi électorale). Le texte du projet vise à soutenir la participation politique du nombre sans cesse croissant de résidents non luxembourgeois en abolissant la condition de durée de résidence de cinq ans des citoyens de l'UE et de pays tiers habitant au Luxembourg pour pouvoir participer aux élections communales, tant au niveau de l’électorat actif que passif. Par ailleurs, la date de clôture de l'inscription des résidents de nationalité étrangère sur les listes électorales communales est ramenée de 87 jours à 55 jours avant l’échéance électorale. Le 26 novembre 2021, le Conseil de gouvernement a approuvé un projet de loi proposant de modifier la loi sur l'immigration. Ce projet de loi vise à assurer une gestion plus efficace de l'éloignement des ressortissants de pays tiers résidant illégalement sur le territoire en structurant les différentes catégories de mesures d'éloignement de manière claire et cohérente. Ce projet de loi a été déposé à la Chambre des Députés le 19 janvier 2022 sous le n°7954. Le projet de loi n°7881 sur les échanges d’informations relatives aux ressortissants de pays tiers à l’Union européenne ainsi que le système européen d’information sur les casiers judiciaires (ECRIS) a été déposé à la Chambre des Députés le 10 septembre 2021. Ce système permettra de rechercher les inscriptions du casier judiciaire des ressortissants de pays tiers qui ont fait l’objet de décisions de justice de juridictions pénales d'autres États membres de l'UE. Comme déjà indiqué dans le Rapport Annuel sur les Migrations et l'Asile 2020 du EMN Luxembourg, le gouvernement prévoit de réformer la loi modifiée du 16 décembre 2008 sur l'accueil et l'intégration des étrangers (ci-après loi sur l'intégration). Les premières consultations d'acteurs sociétaux ont déjà été réalisées en 2020 et ce processus s'est poursuivi en 2021. De multiples consultations avec les acteurs de la société civile, les partenaires sociaux et les communes ont eu lieu et, dans ce contexte, l'OCDE a publié son étude intitulée « Vers un processus d'intégration réussi : Le fonctionnement du système d'intégration et ses acteurs au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg » le 25 novembre 2021. Début 2021, le « Pakt vum Zesummeliewen » (PvZ) a remplacé le Plan communal intégration (PCI) afin de créer un processus d'intégration plus dynamique et pluriannuel pour une inclusion plus forte des communes luxembourgeoises. La formation continue des résidents luxembourgeois a été rendue plus accessible et des cours supplémentaires, adaptés aux demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) et aux bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI), ont été insérés dans l’offre de formation du Service de formation des adultes (SFA). Le Luxembourg a entamé le processus de planification de l'extension de son système de soins de santé public. Il est prévu d'offrir un accès aux soins de santé aux personnes vulnérables, pas couvertes jusqu'à présent. Le Luxembourg a réagi à l'évolution de la situation en Afghanistan depuis la prise du pouvoir par les Talibans en août 2021. Le Luxembourg a suspendu les décisions concernant les demandes de protection internationale des Afghans jusqu'à ce que des informations suffisantes et fiables soient disponibles. Entre la prise du pouvoir par les Talibans en août et la fin de l'année 2021, 71 ressortissants afghans ont bénéficié d'une protection internationale. Ce chiffre inclut 45 ressortissants afghans évacués d'Afghanistan. Le Luxembourg s'est en outre engagé à réinstaller d’autres personnes. Si l'année 2021 a continué à être marquée par la pandémie de COVID-19, plusieurs développements importants, tels que la disponibilité de vaccins et de tests rapides, ont réorienté l'activité de lutte contre la pandémie sur des voies différentes de celles de 2020. L'accent a été mis sur les tests et la vaccination de tous les Luxembourgeois, y compris les DPI et les personnes en situation de séjour irrégulier. Toutefois, la seule frontière extérieure du Luxembourg, à savoir l'aéroport international du Luxembourg, est restée fermée aux ressortissants de pays tiers (RPT). La réglementation luxembourgeoise en matière d'entrée sur le territoire, a été ajustée à de multiples reprises et de manière dynamique en fonction de l'évolution de la pandémie, tout en prévoyant plusieurs dérogations permettant l'entrée de certaines catégories de ressortissants de pays tiers. Le 22 décembre 2021, un règlement grand-ducal a prolongé cette fermeture de la frontière du 31 décembre 2021 au 31 mars 2022. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude sur les sanctions applicables aux demandeurs de protection internationale qui commettent des manquements graves au règlement des structures d’hébergement de l’Office national de l’accueil ou présentent un comportement sérieusement violent.
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2022)

Dans une première partie, la brochure donne les définitions de ce qui constitue « un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil » et « un comportement sérieusement violent ». Ensuite est présenté ... [more ▼]

Dans une première partie, la brochure donne les définitions de ce qui constitue « un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil » et « un comportement sérieusement violent ». Ensuite est présenté le cadre juridique européen et luxembourgeois ainsi que les sanctions applicables aux personnes ayant commis de tels actes. Dans une deuxième partie, la brochure décrit la gestion de ce genre de situation au Luxembourg, y compris l’ampleur et les conditions sous-jacentes du problème, la coopération interinstitutionnelle et les mesures préventives en place, ainsi que les difficultés perçues par les acteurs impliqués, avant de donner un exemple de ‘bonne pratique’ adoptée en Finlande. La brochure se termine par un aperçu des mesures possibles évoquées par les acteurs impliqués afin d’améliorer la prévention et la gestion des situations dans lesquels un DPI commet un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil ou présente un comportement sérieusement violent. [less ▲]

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See detailVulnerability in the Context of Migration: a Critical Overview and a New Conceptual Model
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

in Human Arenas (2022)

The notion of “vulnerability” occupies a central role in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates, and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity has led some academics and ... [more ▼]

The notion of “vulnerability” occupies a central role in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates, and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity has led some academics and practitioners to use “vulnerability” as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, a common and systematic understanding of the concept is still missing, and the moral and political meaning often ascribed to this notion may have (un)intended detrimental consequences for those migrants deemed vulnerable. Thus, this paper sets out to critically unpack and highlight the complexities hidden behind this notion in order to provide a conceptual analysis of vulnerability in the context of migration. We do so by (1) providing an overview of definitions of vulnerability across different fields of research, (2) identifying common conceptualizations or types of vulnerability and discussing their implications, and (3) highlighting possible negative societal and psychological consequences of its implementation in the context of migration. Finally, we propose (4) a new conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration, showing how this notion can become a useful analytical tool in migration research. [less ▲]

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See detailLocational Choice and Secondary Movements from the Perspective of Forced Migrants: A Comparison of the Destinations Luxembourg and Germany
Glorius, Birgit; Nienaber, Birte UL

in Comparative Population Studies (2022), 47

In 2015 and 2016, the enormous increase in asylum seekers travelling along the Balkan Route confronted the Member States of the European Union with an exceptional pressure on national asylum systems ... [more ▼]

In 2015 and 2016, the enormous increase in asylum seekers travelling along the Balkan Route confronted the Member States of the European Union with an exceptional pressure on national asylum systems. Since then academic literature has revealed a reappraisal of the Common European Asylum System at regulative and policy implementation level, notably regarding the fair distribution of asylum seekers across Member States and regions. Yet we know very little about the locational choices of forced migrants or how those choices evolved and transformed during their journey. In this paper, we aim to shed light on those decision-making processes and (individual, subjective) locational choices based on the aspiration-ability model, drawing from a series of qualitative interviews with migrants held in Luxembourg and Germany in the context of the H2020 project CEASEVAL. We focus on the migrants’ journeys to their actual recipient countries, highlighting mobility trajectories from the moment of fi rst departure and on the process of decision-making regarding their choice of location. Then, we examine further mobility aspirations, which may lead to secondary mobility within or out of the country of residence. In the concluding section, we discuss the consequences of our fi ndings for migration and asylum politics against the background of the “autonomy of migration” framework. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnual Report on Migration and Asylum Part 1 2021 Luxembourg
Holzapfel, Nicole UL; Mellinger, Lukas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

KEY POINTS 1. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain ... [more ▼]

KEY POINTS 1. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain provisions relating to intercorporate transferees, trainees and family reunification. 2. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Asylum Law modifies the remedies available to applicants of international protection (AIPs). This law increases their effectiveness and guarantees maximum legal certainty in the context of transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as well as in the case of final decisions to close proceedings on an application for international protection and of decisions to withdraw international protection. 3. Bill 7877, introduced to Parliament on 2 September 2021, proposes abolishing the 5-year residency clause on active and passive voting rights in municipal elections for EU- and non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg [less ▲]

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See detailIntegration of migrant women in Luxembourg: policies and measures
Osburg, Mathis UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

This study provides an overview of the current policies and measures in Luxembourg regarding the integration of third-country national migrant women. Luxembourg follows a mainstream approach regarding ... [more ▼]

This study provides an overview of the current policies and measures in Luxembourg regarding the integration of third-country national migrant women. Luxembourg follows a mainstream approach regarding integration. According to the Law of 16 December 2008 on the integration of foreigners in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, integration is a two-way process that includes both the foreigner and the Luxembourgish society, thereby aiming at all non-Luxembourgish nationals (EU citizens and third-country nationals alike), independent of their gender. However, both national and EU funds may finance measures to support the integration of third-country national migrant women. The number of third-country national women in Luxembourg has increased steadily over the last years, representing 8,1% of the total female population in 2020. Most first residence titles issued to third-country national women were based on family reasons. Depending on the reasons for immigration, the most common countries of origin were India, the U.S.A., and China (to pursue remunerated activities), as well as Syria, Eritrea, the Philippines (for ‘other’ reasons, which includes, among others, beneficiaries of international protection), and Brazil (for family reasons). While third-country national women in Luxembourg comprise a diverse population, occupying jobs in both high-skilled and low-skilled employment sectors, they experience several challenges. Despite higher levels of education, they are more exposed to overcrowded housing, lower household income, lower activity rates, and higher unemployment rates than Luxembourgish women. Moreover, third-country national women are less often enrolled on electoral lists for municipal elections than female EU foreigners. Finally, the issue of discrimination towards (female) residents of African descent in Luxembourg has generated debates in recent years. The study also presents three projects specifically addressing third-country national women, which have been identified as examples of good practices in the context of integration of migrant women, namely ‘Le Temps des Femmes’ by Caritas, ‘Concept d’Intégration, d’Accompagnement et d’Orientation (CIAO!)' by Femmes en Détresse, and ‘Intégration par le Sport’ by the municipality of Esch-sur-Alzette. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-country national victims of trafficking in human beings: Detection, identification and protection in Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

This study provides an overview of the current procedures and practices regarding the detection, identification and protection of victims of trafficking in human beings from third-countries in Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

This study provides an overview of the current procedures and practices regarding the detection, identification and protection of victims of trafficking in human beings from third-countries in Luxembourg. Since 2016, Luxembourg saw a number of significant developments with regard to legislation, institutional and policy reforms, as well as debates and awareness campaigns related to the detection, identification, and protection of (presumed) third-country national victims of trafficking in human beings. These include, among others, several legislative developments strengthening procedural safeguards and the fight against certain forms of exploitation; the establishment of a National Action Plan on ‘Trafficking in Human Beings’ (including a confidential roadmap for relevant stakeholders in the field) and a National Action Plan on ‘Prostitution’ (which also relates to trafficking in human beings); an enhanced cooperation on the Benelux level; the creation of the Search for Fugitives and Victim Protection Unit of the Judicial Police (including reinforcement in 2021); the appointment of contact person for the fight against trafficking in human beings at the Directorate of Immigration and a ‘trafficking’ reference person in each of its departments; the reinforcement of the support for victims of trafficking (including the establishment of a common space (‘INFOTRAITE’) for the two approved assistance services SAVTEH and COTEH); an increase and broadening of the basic and specialised training for various stakeholders; and the organisation of information and awareness raising campaigns. At the same time, the national referral mechanism in Luxembourg has remained the same since its establishment: all stakeholders who detect a (presumed) third-country national victim of trafficking in human beings are obliged to refer cases to the Organised Crime Unit and the Search for Fugitives and Victim Protection Unit of the Judicial Police. Only the Judicial police can formally identify a victim of trafficking and notify the Directorate of Immigration of the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs in view of issuing a reflection period of 90 days to the third-country national. Before the expiration of the reflection period, the Directorate of Immigration consults with the Police in order to determine whether a residence permit for victims of trafficking in human beings may be issued to the third-country national. For all the details, including challenges and good practices in the area of detecting, identifying, and protecting victims of trafficking in human beings in Luxembourg, have a look at the EMN Luxembourg Study. [less ▲]

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See detailDétection des vulnérabilités dans la procédure de protection internationale
Petry, Ralph UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2021)

La vulnérabilité des demandeurs de protection internationale est un élément clé de l’acquis communautaire en matière d’asile. La directive relative aux procédures d’asile (2013/32/UE – refonte) et la ... [more ▼]

La vulnérabilité des demandeurs de protection internationale est un élément clé de l’acquis communautaire en matière d’asile. La directive relative aux procédures d’asile (2013/32/UE – refonte) et la directive sur les conditions d’accueil (2013/33/UE – refonte) prévoient des dispositions particulières pour les personnes vulnérables en ce qui concerne, respectivement, la procédure de protection internationale (c’est-à-dire des garanties procédurales spéciales) et l’accueil (c’est-à-dire des besoins particuliers en matière d’accueil). Par conséquent, pour que les États membres soient en mesure de prévoir et de garantir ces dispositions particulières pour les demandeurs vulnérables, il est essentiel qu’une vulnérabilité potentielle soit détectée et identifiée à un stade précoce de la procédure de protection internationale. C’est dans ce contexte que EMN Luxembourg a décidé, en consultation avec les autorités luxembourgeoises et des acteurs nationaux, de lancer une demande d’information aux Etats membres. L’objectif de cette note de synthèse est de déterminer comment les vulnérabilités des demandeurs de protection internationale sont détectées dans le cadre de la procédure de protection internationale dans les Etats membres de l’UE et comment le suivi de cette détection est garanti par les autorités et les acteurs impliqués, y compris les garanties procédurales spéciales. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration Internationale au Luxembourg: Système d'observation permanente des migrations OCDE
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif à l’immigration. Entre 2019 et 2020 la population luxembourgeoise a continué à augmenter principalement en raison de l’immigration nette, passant de 626.108 à 634.730 ... [more ▼]

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif à l’immigration. Entre 2019 et 2020 la population luxembourgeoise a continué à augmenter principalement en raison de l’immigration nette, passant de 626.108 à 634.730 habitants (+1,4%), mais d’une manière plus discrète que les années précédentes. La part luxembourgeoise représente 52,8% de la population et les ressortissants étrangers 47,2%. La pandémie a dominé la politique en matière d’immigration et asile pendant l’année 2020 et 2021. Ces politiques ont impacté tous les secteurs au Luxembourg y compris les volets de l’immigration et de l’asile. La fermeture des frontières extérieures de l’Union Européenne, la réintroduction temporaire des contrôles aux frontières internes de l’espace Schengen (décrétées par l’Allemagne, la Belgique et la France) et la perturbation du trafic aérien international ont affecté les mouvements migratoires vers et au départ du Luxembourg. La limitation des mouvements des ressortissants pays tiers (RPT) s’est compliquée suite à la déclaration de l’état de crise entre le 18 mars et le 13 mai 2020 et la fermeture des services d’immigration et asile. Néanmoins, afin d’éviter qu’ils ne tombent dans une situation irrégulière, les autorités luxembourgeoises ont étendu la durée de validité des titres et cartes de séjour et des visas de manière automatique. De même, le traitement des dossiers et la prise de décision par la Direction de l’immigration se sont poursuivis sans interruption. L’interdiction d’entrée des RPT (avec des exceptions pour certaines catégories) a été maintenue jusqu’au 30 juin 2021. Une baisse significative du nombre de titres de séjour délivrés, de demandes d'autorisation temporaire de séjour et de visas de court séjour a été constatée, ainsi qu’une diminution de presque 50% des demandes de protection internationale. Le regroupement familial est resté le principal type de titre de séjour en 2020. Les limitations de mouvements ont aussi une incidence sur les transferts sous le règlement Dublin ainsi que sur les retours vers le pays d’origine. Au cours de l’année 2020, le Luxembourg a continué à maintenir ses engagements de solidarité internationale avec la relocalisation et la réinstallation des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) puisque 25 personnes (dont 16 mineurs) ont été relocalisées et 14 réinstallées. La réception des DPI s’est poursuivie car l’Office national de l’accueil (ONA) n’a pas fermé ses guichets. Un défi majeur est constitué par les taux d’occupation élevés dans les structures d’hébergement de l’ONA. La crise du logement affecte particulièrement les bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI) qui peinent à trouver un logement en-dehors des structures d’accueil réservées en principe aux DPI. Dans ce contexte l’ONA a poursuivi ses efforts à inciter les communes à promouvoir la mise en place de structures d’hébergement pour DPI et/ou de possibilités d’hébergement pour BPI. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of vulnerabilities in the international protection procedure
Petry, Ralph UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Article for general public (2021)

The vulnerability of applicants for international protection is a key component of the EU acquis on asylum, with both the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU) and the Recast Reception ... [more ▼]

The vulnerability of applicants for international protection is a key component of the EU acquis on asylum, with both the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU) and the Recast Reception Conditions Directive (2013/33/EU) providing special provisions for vulnerable persons with regard to the procedure for international protection (i.e. special procedural guarantees) and reception (i.e. special reception needs), respectively. Hence, in order for Member States to be able to provide and guarantee these special provisions for vulnerable applicants, it is essential that a potential vulnerability is detected and identified at an early stage in the international protection procedure. It is in this context that EMN Luxembourg decided, in consultation with the Luxembourgish authorities and national stakeholders, to launch a request for information to Member States via the EMN ad-hoc query system. As a consequence, the aim of this Inform is to map how vulnerabilities of applicants for international protection are detected in the international protection procedure in EU Member States and how the follow-up of this detection is guaranteed by the authorities and stakeholders involved, including special procedural guarantees. [less ▲]

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See detailVulnerability in the context of migration: a critical assessment of its conceptualizations and uses
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 07)

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its ... [more ▼]

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity, not limited to this field, has often led academics and practitioners to use ‘vulnerability’ as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, vulnerability is neither conceptually straight-forward nor politically and morally neutral. Multiple definitions and operationalizations of vulnerability exist across and within different fields of research and practice, without a common and systematic understanding of the concept. The notion of vulnerability can also be instrumentilised as a tool for discrimination, stigmatization, control, exclusion or even reduction of humanitarian assistance, when access to protection is restricted to ‘the most vulnerable’. In the context of the H2020 project MIMY (n°870700), this paper examines the multiplicities and hidden pitfalls behind different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and critically reflects on their implication for the study and governance of migration. By unpacking this concept, we hope to highlight both limitations and opportunities enclosed in the notion of vulnerability and encourage migration scholars to understand, address and take a stand before its complexities. Based on these considerations, a multilevel conceptual model of vulnerability in the specific context of migration is proposed. The model aims to capture several types and understandings of vulnerability and how these are (re)produced at different levels and by different actors, including migrants themselves. Particular attention is paid to migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability and how policy and political frameworks may affect them. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and mobility of third-country national labour workers to and inside Europe during the Covid-19 pandemic – a legal analysis
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

in Comparative Migration Studies (2021), 9(22), 17

The Covid-19 pandemic took most EU Member States of the European Union by surprise, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion across the continent. The response of the EU Member States was ... [more ▼]

The Covid-19 pandemic took most EU Member States of the European Union by surprise, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion across the continent. The response of the EU Member States was asymmetrical, individualistic and significantly slow. The first measures taken were to close down the internal borders. The European Union's response was even slower, and it was not until 17th March 2020 that the external borders were closed. These actions affected legal migration into the European Union from four perspectives: it affected 1) the mobility of those third-country nationals who were on a temporary stay in the EU Member States; 2) the entry of third-country nationals to do seasonal work; 3) legal migrants entering and staying; and 4) the status of the third-country nationals already residing in the EU Member States, especially those experiencing a loss of income. This article will deal with the EU Member States' measures to manage the immigration services, as a case study how Luxembourg dealt to avoid that temporary staying migrants and regular migrants fall into irregularity. Finally, we will focus on the vulnerability of third-country nationals with the rising risk of unemployment and the risk of being returned to their country of origin. The article will also analyse access to healthcare and unemployment benefits. [less ▲]

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See detailDetention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg. Luxembourgish legislation, namely the amended Law of 29 August 2008 on Free Movement of Persons and Immigration (Immigration Law) and the Law of 18 December 2015 on International Protection and Temporary Protection (Asylum Law), foresees three alternatives to detention: - Alternative 1: Reporting obligations, which includes the obligation to surrender a passport, travel document or identity document; - Alternative 2: Home custody (+ electronic monitoring, if necessary); - Alternative 3: Deposition of a financial guarantee of 5.000€. In principle, the assessment between detention or alternatives to detention is made at the same time as when the grounds for detention are considered, as long as the Directorate of Immigration, as the responsible authority, has all the necessary information to decide if an alternative to detention can be ordered. Furthermore, the possibility to impose an alternative to detention is in principle systemically considered, as both relevant laws foresee that the detention decision is ordered in writing by the Minister on the basis of a case-by-case assessment, where necessary and if other less coercive measures cannot be effectively applied. Grounds for detention are generally rejected in favour of an alternative to detention if the person concerned falls within the category of vulnerable groups and if person is able to proof effective guarantees of representation to prevent the risk of absconding. This latter obligation on the third-country national to revert the legal presumption that there is a risk of absconding remains the main challenge because effective guarantees of representation are not defined by law. This is particularly challenging in the context of return procedures, where this legal presumption exists in nearly all cases where a third-country national has no valid identity, travel or residence documents. In the absence of such effective guarantees of representation, the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum generally does not make the decision to apply an alternative to detention. Consequently, the research in the context of this study has shown that alternatives to detention are only rarely used in Luxembourg, with the important exception of home custody in the Emergency Housing Structure of Kirchberg (‘Structure d’hébergement d’urgence Kirchberg’ – SHUK). The SHUK serves as a semi-open return facility for applicants for international protection and irregularly staying third-country nationals whose fingerprints have already been registered in Eurodac by another Member State and are therefore likely to be transferred to that Member State, in accordance with the Dublin III Regulation. A placement at the SHUK corresponds to home custody. The rare use of alternatives to detention also results in the fact that there is generally not much data available in this regard, with the important exception of home custody in the SHUK, which is more widely used. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-country National Labour Workers' Mobility to and inside Europe during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nienaber, Birte UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 15)

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the ... [more ▼]

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the impact that this border closures and the pandemic had on third-country nationals living or visiting the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailNOWHERELAND REVISITED IN TIMES OF PANDEMIC 2020
Trummer, Ursula; Novak-Zezula, Sonja; Dauvrin, Marie et al

Report (2021)

Undocumented Migrants (UDM) belong to the most vulnerable groups in times of global emergency situations. COVID-19 does hit hardest the most vulnerable groups and it is important to create an evidence ... [more ▼]

Undocumented Migrants (UDM) belong to the most vulnerable groups in times of global emergency situations. COVID-19 does hit hardest the most vulnerable groups and it is important to create an evidence base to guide policy making. The Center for Health and Migration, Vienna, has initiated a stock-taking of national regulations concerning access to health and social care for UDM. The initiative aims to create a landscape of policy frameworks to inform policy making and practice development. National experts on health and migration are contacted and asked to provide information on the respective legal frameworks in the following categories: work, housing, compulsory education, social welfare, and health. A validated template is used for data collection. [less ▲]

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See detailLes dimensions territoriales de la formation par alternance en transfrontalier
Belkacem, Rachid; Dörrenbächer, Peter; Funk, Ines et al

in Gremmo, Marie-José (Ed.) Politique et territoires en éducation et formation (2021)

This paper focuses on the construction of training systems in a cross-border context. It focuses on the Greater Saar-Lor-Lux Region at the crossroads of four countries (France, Luxembourg, Belgium and ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on the construction of training systems in a cross-border context. It focuses on the Greater Saar-Lor-Lux Region at the crossroads of four countries (France, Luxembourg, Belgium and Germany) due to the strong growth of cross-border work. It shows that the construction of transferable qualifications from one territory to another is a fundamental issue for these territories, which is part of a real multi-actor and multi-level territorial construction process. This analysis shows that the development of these training programmes such as apprenticeship was made possible by a strong regional and European political will. The latter has provided a framework for numerous localized initiatives stimulated by local cross-border cooperation. The territories have thus been capable of learning and invention. [less ▲]

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See detailANNUAL REPORT ON MIGRATION AND ASYLUM Luxembourg 2020
Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2021)

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from ... [more ▼]

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from Luxembourg. In 2020, there was a significant decrease in the number of residence permits, applications for temporary authorisation of stay and visas (short stay visas and D-visas), a reduction of around 50% on the number of applications for international protection and a decline in Dublin transfers and returns. Public health measures in response to the pandemic significantly impacted migration policies. For instance, Luxembourg temporarily closed its borders to third-country nationals and automatically regularized the stay of third-country nationals whose legal residence status ended during the state of crisis. Moreover, personal interviews with applicants of international protection (AIPs) and Dublin transfers were suspended. Lastly, irregular migrants were granted access to healthcare, free of charge, regardless of their social security coverage without being issued a return order or being placed in detention during the pandemic. Outside of the COVID-19 context, the following developments can be highlighted: The introduction of Bill n°7682 foresees the extension of the time limit from three to six months available to beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) to apply for family reunification after the granting of their status, as well as the simplification of administrative procedures, concerning the elimination of the requirement to provide integral copies of travel documents for family members of the third-country national applying for family reunification. At the procedural level, Bill n°7682 aims to amend the appeal procedure against a Dublin transfer decision to increase their effectiveness while guaranteeing maximum legal security for the applicant for international protection. It proposes to amend the Asylum Law by introducing “extraordinary” remedies against a final decision to close proceedings and against a decision to withdraw international protection. The Grand Ducal Regulation of 4 November 2020 entered into force, establishing the Commission on the evaluation of the best interest of unaccompanied minors in return decisions. However, this commission continues to generate debates and criticism, especially from fundamental rights organisations, regarding its composition. In view of the high occupancy rate in the ONA’s accommodation structures, efforts to promote the construction of new accommodation structures continued in 2020. A new emergency reception facility was set up for newcomers. Strengthening the fight against trafficking in human beings was another priority of the Luxembourgish government. As a result, the composition of the Monitoring Committee on the Fight Against the Trafficking in Human Beings was implemented by Grand Ducal Regulation. Other strategic developments were implemented, such as the elaboration of a second National Action Plan on Human Trafficking and an enhanced collaboration at the Benelux and EU level. In terms of integration, several major developments should be noted: The creation of a communication service within the Department of Integration The first interministerial committee on integration open to civil society took place on 16 December 2020 The launch of a large consultation including all key actors on the future of integration policies The selection of several municipalities to take part in a pilot phase regarding a new approach to the Communal Plan on Integration (PCI) A discussion in Parliament on the issue of racism and discrimination, which resulted in the adoption of two motions and a resolution. One of the motions provided for a study on racism and ethno-racial discrimination and the resolution aims to strengthen the resources of the Centre for Equal Treatment (CET). The Minister of Education, Children and Youth is planning to set up a service specifically responsible for the integration and reception of children of foreign origin and to review the procedures for taking care of newly arrived pupils [less ▲]

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