References of "Nadeau, Joseph H."
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See detailQuantitative trait locus mapping identifies a locus linked to striatal dopamine and points to collagen IV alpha-6 chain as a novel regulator of striatal axonal branching in mice
Thomas, Melanie UL; Gui, Yujuan; Garcia, Pierre UL et al

in Genes, Brain, and Behavior (2021)

Dopaminergic neurons (DA neurons) are controlled by multiple factors, many involved in neurological disease. Parkinson's disease motor symptoms are caused by the demise of nigral DA neurons, leading to ... [more ▼]

Dopaminergic neurons (DA neurons) are controlled by multiple factors, many involved in neurological disease. Parkinson's disease motor symptoms are caused by the demise of nigral DA neurons, leading to loss of striatal dopamine (DA). Here, we measured DA concentration in the dorsal striatum of 32 members of Collaborative Cross (CC) family and their eight founder strains. Striatal DA varied greatly in founders, and differences were highly heritable in the inbred CC progeny. We identified a locus, containing 164 genes, linked to DA concentration in the dorsal striatum on chromosome X. We used RNAseq profiling of the ventral midbrain of two founders with substantial difference in striatal DA–C56BL/6 J and A/J—to highlight potential protein-coding candidates modulating this trait. Among the five differentially expressed genes within the locus, we found that the gene coding for the collagen IV alpha 6 chain (Col4a6) was expressed nine times less in A/J than in C57BL/6J. Using single cell RNA-seq data from developing human midbrain, we found that COL4A6 is highly expressed in radial glia-like cells and neuronal progenitors, indicating a role in neuronal development. Collagen IV alpha-6 chain (COL4A6) controls axogenesis in simple model organisms. Consistent with these findings, A/J mice had less striatal axonal branching than C57BL/6J mice. We tentatively conclude that DA concentration and axonal branching in dorsal striatum are modulated by COL4A6, possibly during development. Our study shows that genetic mapping based on an easily measured Central Nervous System (CNS) trait, using the CC population, combined with follow-up observations, can parse heritability of such a trait, and nominate novel functions for commonly expressed proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailPituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 Orchestrates Gene Regulatory Variation in Mouse Ventral Midbrain During Aging
Gui, Yujuan UL; Thomas, Mélanie H.; Garcia, Pierre et al

in Frontiers in Genetics (2020)

Dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain are of particular interest due to their role in diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Genetic variation between individuals can affect the integrity ... [more ▼]

Dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain are of particular interest due to their role in diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Genetic variation between individuals can affect the integrity and function of dopaminergic neurons but the DNA variants and molecular cascades modulating dopaminergic neurons and other cells types of ventral midbrain remain poorly defined. Three genetically diverse inbred mouse strains – C57BL/6J, A/J, and DBA/2J – differ significantly in their genomes (∼7 million variants), motor and cognitive behavior, and susceptibility to neurotoxins. To further dissect the underlying molecular networks responsible for these variable phenotypes, we generated RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data from ventral midbrains of the 3 mouse strains. We defined 1000–1200 transcripts that are differentially expressed among them. These widespread differences may be due to altered activity or expression of upstream transcription factors. Interestingly, transcription factors were significantly underrepresented among the differentially expressed genes, and only one transcription factor, Pttg1, showed significant differences between all three strains. The changes in Pttg1 expression were accompanied by consistent alterations in histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at Pttg1 transcription start site. The ventral midbrain transcriptome of 3-month-old C57BL/6J congenic Pttg1–/– mutants was only modestly altered, but shifted toward that of A/J and DBA/2J in 9-month-old mice. Principle component analysis (PCA) identified the genes underlying the transcriptome shift and deconvolution of these bulk RNA-seq changes using midbrain single cell RNA-seq data suggested that the changes were occurring in several different cell types, including neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Taken together, our results show that Pttg1 contributes to gene regulatory variation between mouse strains and influences mouse midbrain transcriptome during aging. [less ▲]

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See detailTurn up the heat: circulating serotonin tunes our internal heating system.
Schneider, Jochen UL; Nadeau, Joseph H.

in Cell metabolism (2015), 21(2), 156-8

Serotonin acts as neurotransmitter in the brain and as a multifaceted signaling molecule coordinating many physiological processes in the periphery. In a recent issue of Nature Medicine, Crane et al ... [more ▼]

Serotonin acts as neurotransmitter in the brain and as a multifaceted signaling molecule coordinating many physiological processes in the periphery. In a recent issue of Nature Medicine, Crane et al. (2014) find that peripheral serotonin controls thermogenesis in adipose tissue by modulating beta-adrenergic stimulation of UCP-1, thereby affecting glucose homeostasis and weight gain. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic and molecular control of folate-homocysteine metabolism in mutant mice.
Ernest, Sheila; Christensen, Benedicte; Gilfix, Brian M. et al

in Mammalian Genome (2002), 13(5), 259-67

Hyperhomocysteinemia adversely affects fundamental aspects of fetal development, adulthood, and aging, but the role of elevated homocysteine levels in these birth defects and adult diseases remains ... [more ▼]

Hyperhomocysteinemia adversely affects fundamental aspects of fetal development, adulthood, and aging, but the role of elevated homocysteine levels in these birth defects and adult diseases remains unclear. Mouse models are valuable for investigating the causes and consequences of hyperhomocysteinemia. We used a phenotype-based approach to identify mouse mutants for studying the relation between single gene mutations, homocysteine levels as a measure of the status of homocysteine metabolism, and gene expression profiles as a way to assess the impact of protein deficiency in mutant mice on steady-state transcription levels of genes in the folate-homocysteine pathways. These mutants were selected based on their propensity to produce phenotypes that are reminiscent of those associated with anomalies in folate-homocysteine metabolism in humans. We report identification of new, single-gene mouse models of homocysteinemia and characterization of their molecular and physiological impact on folate-homocysteine metabolism. Mutations in several genes involved in the hedgehog and WNT signal transduction pathways, as well as a gene involved in lipid metabolism, resulted in elevated homocysteine levels and altered expression profiles of folate-homocysteine metabolism genes. These results begin to unravel the complex relations between elevation of a single amino acid in the blood and the diverse birth defects and adult diseases associated with hyperhomocysteinemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (1 UL)