References of "Murphy, Emily 50039587"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRewealthization in twenty-first century Western countries: the defining trend of the socioeconomic squeeze of the middle class
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar Haim, Eyal; Hartung, Anne et al

in Journal of Chinese Sociology (2021), 8

The wealth-to-income ratio (WIR) in many Western countries, particularly in Europe and North America, increased by a factor of two in the last three decades. This represents a defining empirical trend: a ... [more ▼]

The wealth-to-income ratio (WIR) in many Western countries, particularly in Europe and North America, increased by a factor of two in the last three decades. This represents a defining empirical trend: a rewealthization (from the French repatrimonialisation)—or the comeback of (inherited) wealth primacy since the mid-1990s. For the sociology of social stratification, “occupational classes” based on jobs worked must now be understood within a context of wealth-based domination. This paper first illustrates important empirical features of an era of rising WIR. We then outline the theory of rewealthization as a major factor of class transformations in relation to regimes stabilized in the post-WWII industrial area. Compared to the period where wealth became secondary to education and earnings for middle-class lifestyles, rewealthization steepens society's vertical structure; the "olive-shaped" Western society is replaced by a new one where wealth "abundance" at the top masks social reproduction and frustrations below. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail‘You got into Oxbridge?’ Under‐represented students’ experiences of an elite university in the south of England
Stubbs, Joshua; Murphy, Emily UL

in Higher Education Quarterly (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe feminization of occupations and change in wages: A panel analysis of Britain, Germany, and Switzerland
Murphy, Emily UL; Oesch, Daniel

in Social Forces (2016), 94(3), 1221-1255

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWorkers’ Movement out of Declining Occupations in Great Britain, Germany and Switzerland
Murphy, Emily UL

in European Sociological Review (2014), 30(1), 588-602

The employment structure undergoes constant change. Certain occupations grow while others decline under the pressure of technological advances, internationalization and welfare state reforms. This ... [more ▼]

The employment structure undergoes constant change. Certain occupations grow while others decline under the pressure of technological advances, internationalization and welfare state reforms. This evolution at the aggregate level has been well documented. Our knowledge of how macro-level change in the employment structure is brought about through micro-level career adjustments is less extensive. Drawing on panel data, this paper examines the types of workers most likely to leave occupations that have declined over the past 20 years, and the most likely destination of these exits in Great Britain, Germany and Switzerland. Overall, we find that women are more likely than men to leave a declining occupation, and the most likely route out of declining occupations for female workers is towards low paid growing occupations. Clerical workers are more likely to exit to high paid growing occupations than production workers, and male production workers are at higher risk than female clerks of exiting into unemployment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailNot participating in education, employment or training (NEET): Hope to mitigate new social risks in the UK?
Murphy, Emily UL; Holmes, Craig; Mayhew, Ken

E-print/Working paper (n.d.)

Young people not participating in education, employment or training (NEET) are a key policy concern in Europe. We examine whether hope, as a form of life course agency, plays a protective role against the ... [more ▼]

Young people not participating in education, employment or training (NEET) are a key policy concern in Europe. We examine whether hope, as a form of life course agency, plays a protective role against the risk of being NEET in the context of the British welfare state. Hope is conceptualised as multidimensional: being a temporally embedded, agentic mentality comprised of one’s sense of adaptive decision-making in the present and pathways thinking towards the future. Longitudinal estimations based on the latest Understanding Society microdata (2009-2018) indicate a direct association between higher-hope modes, on average, and a lower likelihood of being NEET. Further, our study assesses whether hopeful agency is moderated by the experience of parental worklessness. Findings indicate that while hope is not more important for those who experienced disadvantages in upbringing, hopeful agency is shown to be equally important in the face of past and present NEET risks. For the UK, building young peoples’ adaptive, agentic mentality towards their future in education or employment over the long-term, may prove one cost-effective policy approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (50 UL)