References of "Muresan, Laura"
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See detailLearning in transition: Erasmus+ as an opportunity for internationalization
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Nienaber, Birte UL; Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL et al

in Cairns, David (Ed.) The Palgrave Handbook of Youth Mobility and Educational Migration (2021)

Erasmus+ has diversified its benefits for young people to learn and thrive via mobility in the last 30 years. How does Erasmus+ serve young people? We conducted 10 semi-structured interviews with young ... [more ▼]

Erasmus+ has diversified its benefits for young people to learn and thrive via mobility in the last 30 years. How does Erasmus+ serve young people? We conducted 10 semi-structured interviews with young people (aged between 18-29) in Luxembourg, Norway and Romania. Firstly, these young people feel that their identity changes as they internationalise and they travel more after the Erasmus+ experience. Hence, Erasmus+ is an eye opener. Secondly, employment, volunteering or training activities under Erasmus+ become a door-opener increasing young people’s chances of finding jobs. Thirdly, Erasmus+ does not end when the mobility ends: a new life style is adopted and nostalgia with the Erasmus+ leads to feeling at “home” in international environments. All these three aspects can be defined as Erasmus-isation encapsulated within a life-long perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailAgency and Structure Revisited with Youth Responses to Gendered (Spatial) Mobilities in the EU
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Schlimbach, Tabea; Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL et al

in Border Crossings (2020), 10

Young people involved in geographical mobility face diverse gendered mobility settings and gender inequalities. How do the youth involved in diverse mobility types deal with adverse circumstances caused ... [more ▼]

Young people involved in geographical mobility face diverse gendered mobility settings and gender inequalities. How do the youth involved in diverse mobility types deal with adverse circumstances caused by gender beliefs and gender prejudices? To answer this question, problem-centred interviews with young people (18-29) are analysed using Grounded Theory. These young people are European citizens and they are involved in five mobility types: higher education, employment, voluntary work, vocational education & training, and entrepreneurship. We apply Emirbayer and Mische’s (1998) categories (iterational, projective and practical-evaluative) to the analysis of gendered mobility narratives as unequal gender perceptions reveal themselves in the context of different types of youth mobility. The analysis allows to see the ways young people reflect on their actions: refusal of gender beliefs, acceptance or rejection of gendered prejudices, individual vs. collective solutions, demand for equality in numbers, comparison of gendered workplaces and assumption of leadership in initiating mobility. At the same time, we observe how geographical mobilities can increase the critical sensibility of youth towards gender inequalities, contributing to new conceptualisation of agentic responses to structural constraints. [less ▲]

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