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See detailAttitudes towards Multiculturalism in Luxembourg: Measurement Invariance and Factor Structure of the Multicultural Ideology Scale
Stogianni, Maria UL; Murdock, Elke UL; He, Jia et al

in International Journal of Intercultural Relations (in press)

In the present study, we examined the dimensionality and the measurement invariance of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (MCI), and mean differences across different cultural groups within the multilingual ... [more ▼]

In the present study, we examined the dimensionality and the measurement invariance of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (MCI), and mean differences across different cultural groups within the multilingual, multicultural context of Luxembourg. Luxembourg is a unique context to study attitudes towards diversity because 47.4% of the citizens are non-nationals (i.e. economic migrants, sojourners, refugees) and minority and majority are increasingly difficult to define. Our sample included 1,488 participants from diverse ethnic backgrounds who completed the survey in German, French or English. In contrast to previous findings, our analyses on responses to the MCI scale produced a two-dimensional structure, distinguishing between positive and negative attitudes towards multiculturalism. The factor structure was partially invariant across ethnocultural groups: Configural and metric invariance were established across natives and non-natives and different language versions. Scalar invariance was only established across gender groups. Natives and male participants reported the most negative attitudes towards multiculturalism. We discuss the importance of assessing measurement invariance and provide recommendations to improve the assessment of psychological multiculturalism. [less ▲]

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See detailVisual primes as culture-sensitive method to understanding acculturation processes
Murdock, Elke UL; Campill, Marc-Antoine; Valsiner, Jaan

Scientific Conference (2021, July 31)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich context to explore acculturation processes. The majority of immigrants have European roots, but the number of non-European immigrants is rising. Within this qualitative study we examined the identity construction processes of eight Japanese women living in Luxembourg using several visual primes guiding the interview. Building on Ying-yi Hong’s work on cultural mixing we developed hybrid images to evoke affective responses and to capture the negotiation processes between cultures. The choice of images was carefully prepared and first involved an ethnographic study of cultural dimensions of Japan and Luxembourg. Based on this analysis we decided to explore the domains of beauty, food, living, leisure and family. For each domain, we chose a prototypical European and Japanese image and created a hybrid image. All images were culturally meaningful and anchored in real life experiences. The Japanese images were tested in a pilot study in Japan. The interviews were carefully planned, each phase involving different visual stimuli. In the opening phase, the interviewer presented a business card in three different designs – European, Japanese and a mixed version. Interviewees could choose their preferred version and explain their choice. Next, a series of 15 matched typical images of Japan and Luxembourg were shown and the interviewees again chose their preferred images and explained their choice. Finally, the five sets of domain-specific images were presented. These provided a context for narration and especially the reaction to the hybrid stimuli showed how participants negotiate their cultural identities. The visual primes made the negotiation strategies visible. Findings from this study and the potential of this culture-sensitive method for accessing the process of acculturation will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between Critical Consciousness and Multiculturalism? A comparison across four countries
Eickmann, Wibke; Murdock, Elke UL

Poster (2021, July 29)

Multiculturalism Ideology (MCI) describes the “appreciation of the value of cultural diversity for a society, and a need for mutual acceptance and accommodation that promotes equitable participation” ... [more ▼]

Multiculturalism Ideology (MCI) describes the “appreciation of the value of cultural diversity for a society, and a need for mutual acceptance and accommodation that promotes equitable participation” (Berry, 2016, p. 416f). The aim of the present study was to explore if and how diversity-related attitudes and the perception of less privileged members of society are linked and thus contribute to the growing body of research on social inequity awareness. Whilst some studies have focused on MCI and minority rights, awareness of structural discrimination and lowering prejudice, few have focused specifically on Critical Consciousness (CC), the reflection about inequalities in society and action taken to address them. Components of CC include Critical Reflection (Perceived Inequality and Egalitarianism), Political Efficacy (Internal and External), and Critical Action (Sociopolitical Participation). The present study draws on a quantitative design. An online questionnaire was launched in four countries, France, Luxembourg, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, which differ in their approaches in dealing with diversity. Measures included the Critical Consciousness Scale, the Political Efficacy Short Scale with the subscales regarding internal and external political efficacy and the Multicultural Ideology Scale (MCI). The questionnaire was made available in English, French and German. The total sample comprised 120 participants (68.2% female, Mage = 26.40, SDage = 9.71). Results indicate that MCI was highly positively correlated with Perceived Inequality and Egalitarianism and negatively with External Political Efficacy. Mean scores for CC components and MCI did not statistically differ across the four countries, while the correlation patterns between CC components and MCI were different. This finding suggests that CC may develop quite independently of cultural influences, as perception of unequal treatment and status differences between groups is an issue prevalent in all societies. More detailed results and implications as well as limitations of the present study will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Immigrants‘ Acculturation across the Lifespan
Schwarz, Beate; Maehler, Debora; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes ... [more ▼]

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes with respect to practices and behaviors, values and norms, and identity and identification (Schwartz, Unger, Zamboanga, & Szapocznik, 2010). From a developmental perspective, acculturation of first and second-generation immigrants differ remarkably because usually second generation immigrants have more opportunities to interact with representatives of the host culture in a phase of life with high plasticity (Sam & Oppedal, 2003). The symposium wants to gain insight into the complex acculturation processes with four studies that referred to different dimensions of acculturation and including age groups from adolescence to old age. The studies used quantitative and qualitative analyses and variable- as well as person-centered approaches. Starting with adolescence, Maehler provides a meta-analysis on factors that are related to identification with the ethnic and mainstream culture. Murdock and Gales also refer to the identity dimension of acculturation, here among young adults in Germany. With a qualitative approach they identified the role of the parents and the intergenerational relationships for the way how these young adults integrate both identities. In the third study with middle-aged second- generation immigrants in Switzerland, again intergenerational relationships are in the focus. Schwarz and Pfammatter analyzed the association of intergenerational relationships with orientations toward ethnic and mainstream culture. In the last study, Albert and colleagues used a person-centered approach. They investigated the patterns of sense of belonging on a local and national level of older immigrants in Luxembourg and the associations with expectations to stay and well-being. All four studies provide specific insight into the acculturation mechanism that are relevant in different periods of the lifespan. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural Identity Integration – the importance of the context of the family
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the understanding identifications of persons growing up with multiple cultural experiences and how these influences are negotiated within themselves. The current study draws on a qualitative design and involved a semi-structured interview and two exercises designed to stimulate reflection on cultural influences. We recruited eight female participants, aged between 21 and 25 years, who all grew up in Germany. Their parents originate from a wide range of countries of various cultural distance to Germany. Fairly homogenous in terms of socioeconomic status and educational background, the sample was very diverse in terms of cultural influences. Half of our participants grew up in mixed national families. Building on the multicultural identity integration research we were particularly interested whether participants identify with one cultural group over others (categorization), keep their influences separate (compartmentalization) or link their cultural influences (integration) and drivers for each outcome. The results point towards the important role of parents regarding cultural resources and practices. Our results point to categorization, if there is little or no contact to one parent, compartmentalization, if the relationship between parents is conflicted and integration if both parents engage equally in cultural maintenance. Families are the primary socialization unit and our findings suggest that parental commitment to transfer of cultural values and practices impacts the cultural identity configurations. Findings will be discussed in a systemic perspective of identity construal processes. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the move within themselves – cultural distance and negotiation processes of cultural belonging
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one ... [more ▼]

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one cultural point of reference from birth. In the growing body of literature on bi- and multiculturalism different models of cultural acquisition are described, but still little is known about how the negotiation process takes place and what factors facilitate resolution and well-being. The present study builds on a recent theoretical framework on multicultural identity integration developed by Yampolsky et al. and investigates the role of cultural distance in the negotiation process for cultural belonging. For the present study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eight young women (Mage = 22.6). All grew up in Germany, yet each had a very different other cultural background ranging from Chile, Columbia, France, Ghana, Hungary, Luxembourg, Russia to Sri Lanka. We asked participants about their sense of belonging, perceived similarities and differences between their cultural influences and their way of positioning themselves within these. Each interview was complemented by two visual exercises illustrating the sense of belonging. The results show that all participants engaged in active negotiation processes and arrived at very different solutions in terms of belonging. The cultural integration process depends on a multitude of factors – cultural distance being one, but parents playing an important role. The findings will be discussed in light of current acculturation models. Explanations will be provided with special focus on implications for migration and acculturation research. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Crossing borders – feeling connected? An exploration of drivers influencing the development of a sense of belonging in the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors ... [more ▼]

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors influencing the development of a sense of belonging. It brings together researchers from four different countries, applying different methodological approaches examining the development of belonging among different migrant groups. Jean Décieux explores the role of cultural distance in the host country adjustment process. Suggesting a multidimensional conceptualization of cultural distance, he presents findings based on recently migrated German nationals (N = 2856) drawn from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS). The role of cultural distance in negotiating belonging among young migrant women growing up in Germany is the subject of Elke Murdock’s qualitative study. Results point to the important role of parents in the process. How parents’ commitment or lack of commitment affects their children’s construction of their sense of belonging is the focus of Anna Gruszczynska’s qualitative study among immigrant youth in the UK. She shows the fluctuating nature of the pursuit of belonging in time and space. Gry Paulgaard focuses on immigrants arriving in the rural space of Northern Norway. The project explores everyday life practices of refugees taking the materiality of a place as a starting point, acknowledging the interdependency between the social and material contexts for practice. Finally, Isabelle Albert investigates practices by older migrants living in multicultural Luxembourg, their engagement or otherwise in social practices and how this impacts on their sense of belonging. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring multicultural ideology: Scale development and validation in different languages and contexts
Stogianni, Maria UL; Schmidt, Lea Marie; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

Increased migration has led to the formation of culturally diverse societies in many places around the world. The concept of Multicultural Ideology incorporates two values as a way to promote positive ... [more ▼]

Increased migration has led to the formation of culturally diverse societies in many places around the world. The concept of Multicultural Ideology incorporates two values as a way to promote positive intercultural relations: a) Diversity: the presence of ethnocultural diversity in the population and b) Equity: the right for equal participation of all cultural groups in the society. Both diversity and equity are necessary conditions for the success of multicultural policies. Culturally heterogeneous communities that do not support inclusion and equitable participation of all groups face the negative consequences of segregation and marginalization. In line with this notion, an international research consortium is developing a revised version of the Multicultural Ideology Scale to assess the endorsement of multicultural ideology in different national contexts. The scale aims to distinguish various attitudinal dimensions of multiculturalism, relevant to the acceptance of diversity and social inclusion of different ethnocultural groups: Cultural Maintenance, Social Interaction, Equity/Inclusion, Extent of Differences, Conflictual Relations, Essentialistic Boundaries. We present the first assessment of the new scale in the German language. The survey was administered online to a sample of native German citizens (N = 382) with different demographic characteristics. Our aim was to understand the attitude of native citizens towards cultural diversity and their willingness to have members of ethnic minority groups be included in the larger society. We investigated the factor structure of the scale, its psychometric properties, and the relationship between multicultural ideology and some individual difference variables, such as ethnic group attachment and social dominance orientation. [less ▲]

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See detailMeandering Identities: Affective Dialogues across Continents
Murdock, Elke UL; Campill, Marc-Antoine

Scientific Conference (2021, June 10)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. In terms of its demographic composition, Luxembourg can in fact be described as super-diverse. The foreign population ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. In terms of its demographic composition, Luxembourg can in fact be described as super-diverse. The foreign population percentage stands at 47.5% and encloses migrants of different generation statuses and intentions to stay – ranging from a working day, to the length of a contract to permanence. Luxembourg is a trilingual country, with English and Portuguese being widely spoken as well. Luxembourg thus provides a rich context for identity construction. The majority of immigrants have European roots, but there is an increasing number of foreigners with a non-European background. We explored the identity-construction processes of eight Japanese women who had moved to Luxembourg. In particular, we were interested in the negotiation process or cultural dialogues these Japanese women engage in following their move to Luxembourg. Multicultural Luxembourg and homogenous Japan provide two very different cultural contexts and our aim was to understand if and how our subjects would engage in dialogues across continents. As noted by Hermans (2001) I positions create dialogical relations with each other by reorganizing themselves in flexible ways from one position to another due to its context-dependency. In our qualitative study we prompted context by providing three sets of visual stimuli. The first set comprised typical images of Luxembourg, the second matched images of Japan and in the third set we presented hybrid images – juxtaposing Japanese and European images. Especially the reactions to the last set of primes prompted a dialogical narration – dialogical interactions between different I positions. For the majority of our subjects we observed a harmonious or flexible flow of I positions within the self – a meandering between reference points and experiences in Japan and Luxembourg. Some ambivalence and disharmonious dialogues could also be observed. Examples for these affective dialogues across continents will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Looking back or forward? The cultural identity construction of immigrant youth.
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Maehler, Debora et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June 03)

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature ... [more ▼]

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature review on previous findings on cultural identification of first-generation immigrant youth worldwide, zoom in closer by looking on identity transmission processes between generations and finishing off with individual-level findings on identity construction by second-generation immigrants. First, results from a meta-analysis will be presented which investigated core factors affecting identity development among first-generation youth. The meta-analysis summarized which individual and context related factors predict cultural identity formation. The second study, employing a quantitative design, focuses on the cultural identity processes and dynamics of change between first-generation immigrant parents and their children (second generation) in a heterogeneous European country context - Luxemburg. The third study employs a qualitative design focusing on identity negotiation processes of young second generation immigrants growing up in Germany. Young Tamils were interviewed, exploring the cultural navigation processes in-depth. Findings across the studies and approaches indicate moderate to strong identifications with both, the country of origin and country of residence. The drivers for each outcome will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailInsights from a qualitative study of second-generation young Tamils growing up in Germany
Murdock, Elke UL; Mohanambal, Pavithraa

Scientific Conference (2021, June 03)

The aim of the study is to examine identity construal processes of young Tamils growing up in Germany. Their parents moved to Germany in the 80s fleeing conflict in Sri Lanka. Building on the theoretical ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study is to examine identity construal processes of young Tamils growing up in Germany. Their parents moved to Germany in the 80s fleeing conflict in Sri Lanka. Building on the theoretical framework on biculturalism developed by Yampolsky et al. (2013) we explored, using a qualitative approach, to what extent second-generation Tamils see themselves as a product of two cultures. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with ten participants (5 men and 5 women). All participants were born in Germany and completed schooling in Germany. All participants also attended Tamil schools and speak the Tamil language. Traditional Tamil values include making parents proud (collectivistic orientation), a conservative understanding of gender roles and emphasizing duty over joy. This is quite different to predominant values in Germany which is why we wanted to explore, how second-generation Tamils organize their cultural identities and what compromises they make in order to live up to cultural influences and expectations, focusing on the negotiation processes our participants engage in in navigating their cultural influences. The majority of our participants feel committed to both cultural influences and identify with both. We will show the different ways of compromise our participants have adopted. [less ▲]

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See detailSense of Belonging: Predictors for Host Country Attachment Among Emigrants
Décieux, Jean; Murdock, Elke UL

in Erlinghagen, Marcel; Ette, Andreas; Schneider, Norbert (Eds.) et al The Global Lives of German Migrants: Consequences of International Migration Across the Life Course (2021)

German citizens usually leave their home country voluntarily and face fewer barriers, e.g. in terms of freedom of travel or labour market integration. However, when arriving in their host country, they ... [more ▼]

German citizens usually leave their home country voluntarily and face fewer barriers, e.g. in terms of freedom of travel or labour market integration. However, when arriving in their host country, they are confronted with the need to adapt to life in a new society. Analysing data from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study, we found that half of the emigrants developed a sense of belonging to their new host society. Moreover, we set out to examine this development of host country attachment. Guided by findings from acculturation and expatriate attachment research, we identified factors potentially contributing to host country attachment and tested these in a series of regression models. Permanence of the intended stay is the strongest predictor, and social integration also plays an important role. Host country language competence is also important for the identification processes. Regarding cultural distance, our findings suggest an inverted U-shaped relationship with certain cultural novelty facilitating the development of host country belonging. Moreover, the data point to a complex relationship between cultural characteristics of the target country and factors related to an emotional settlement. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrelates Of Resilience In The Context Of Social Isolation In Seniors (CRISIS)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Presentation (2021, April 21)

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See detailUnemployment at 50+: economic and psychosocial consequences
Murdock, Elke UL; Filbig, Marceline; Borges Neves, Rita

in Wanka, Anna; Walsh, Kieran; Scharf, Thomas (Eds.) et al Social Exclusion in Later Life: Interdisciplinary and Policy Perspectives. International Perspectives on Aging (2021)

Throughout the lifespan, unemployment has severe consequences in terms of economic exclusion, and overall social exclusion, but is compounded in older age. Within the EU, a growing number of older adults ... [more ▼]

Throughout the lifespan, unemployment has severe consequences in terms of economic exclusion, and overall social exclusion, but is compounded in older age. Within the EU, a growing number of older adults (50+) are affected by joblessness. Job loss at a later stage in a professional career may determine an early and permanent exit from the labour market with significant psychosocial consequences. Herein lies the age-specific risk for older unemployed adults: once becoming unemployed they are at greater risk at staying unemployed. As a result, older unemployed people may face income cuts, deprivation of a central adulthood role and their mental and physical health may suffer. In this chapter, we draw attention to the latent functions of work, and the psychosocial consequences of job loss in later life. Applying a life-course perspective, the aim of this chapter is to explore how job loss can be framed as a form of acute economic exclusion, and how this exclusion can have significant implications for poor mental health. In a context of rising retirement ages, and the lack of preparedness of the labour market to deal with an ageing workforce, it is essential to understand these dynamics to guide policy development. [less ▲]

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See detailCan Iceland learn from Luxembourg? Understanding the host country perspective in an increasingly plural composed society
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 inhabitants, Luxembourg had the second highest number of immigrants per inhabitants in Europe in 2017 with Iceland, at 35.5, coming a close second. Since the 60s, Luxembourg’s population nearly doubled and today the foreign population percentage stands at 47.5%. Until the turn of the century, Iceland’s foreign population stood at around 2%, rising steadily over the last 20 years and today stands at 14.4% - having doubled in the last 10 years. Migration studies often focus on the immigrant perspective, but especially when numbers rise, the host country perspective is important. In Luxembourg, we conducted several studies into the attitude towards multiculturalism among the host society. The Inclusive Societies – Iceland project investigated both, the experience of immigrants to Iceland but also the attitude of the native population towards immigrants. Findings from this quantitative study covering 3630 native Icelanders (51.1% women, MAge = 50.8, SD = 15.6), spread across all regions of Iceland will be presented and parallels drawn with findings from Luxembourg. Particular focus will be placed on demographic variables, language, culture contact and citizenship influencing the attitude towards a diverse society. Understanding the attitudes towards immigrants and diversity ideologies held by the native population is important, as these will determine acculturation options open to immigrants. Implications will be discussed in light of empirical findings in Luxembourg and Iceland. [less ▲]

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See detailPerceived Ageism During the Covid-19-Crisis is Longitudinally Related to Subjective Perceptions of Aging
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine et al

in Frontiers in Public Health (2021)

Ageism in media and society has increased sharply during the Covid-19-crisis, with expected negative consequences for the health and well-being of older adults. The current study investigates whether ... [more ▼]

Ageism in media and society has increased sharply during the Covid-19-crisis, with expected negative consequences for the health and well-being of older adults. The current study investigates whether perceived ageism during the crisis longitudinally affects how people perceive their own aging. In June 2020, N = 611 older adults from Luxembourg [aged 60 – 98 years, Mage(SD) = 69.92(6.97)] participated in a survey on their perception of the crisis. In October 2020, N = 523 participated in a second measurement occasion. Participants reported on perceived ageism during the crisis in different domains, their self-perceptions of aging and subjective age. In latent longitudinal regression models, we predicted views on aging at T2 with perceived ageism at T1, while controlling for baseline views on aging and covariates. Perceived ageism at T1 increased self-perceptions of aging as social loss and yielded a trend for physical decline, while there were no effects on subjective age and self-perceptions of aging as continued growth. Views on aging are powerful predictors of well-being and health outcomes in later life. Our data suggest that being the target of ageism during the crisis negatively affects older adults’ self-perceptions of aging and this impact may be felt beyond the current crisis. [less ▲]

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See detailAgeism and Older People's Health and Well-Being during the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Moderating Role of Subjective Aging
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2021), 18

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See detailDevelopment and Validation of the Revised Multicultural Ideology Scale in Germany and Luxembourg
Stogianni, Maria UL; Berry, John; Grigoryev, Dmitry et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

A revised version of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (rMCI; Berry 2020; Berry et al., 1977) is currently being developed to measure endorsement of multiculturalism in different cultural contexts. The ... [more ▼]

A revised version of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (rMCI; Berry 2020; Berry et al., 1977) is currently being developed to measure endorsement of multiculturalism in different cultural contexts. The current study, which is part of this cross-cultural research project, presents the first assessment of the rMCI scale in the German language. The measure aims to cover several attitudinal dimensions of multiculturalism, relevant to the integration of different ethnocultural groups: Cultural Maintenance, Equity/Inclusion, Social interaction, Essentialistic Boundaries, Extent of Differences, and Consequences of Diversity. Two independent datasets were acquired from Germany (N = 382) and Luxembourg (N = 148) to estimate the factor structure of the rMCI using different confirmatory factor analysis techniques. The findings suggest that a 4-factor solution, including Cultural Maintenance, Equity/Inclusion, Social interaction, and Consequences of Diversity, was the best fit for the data. Most of these subscales demonstrated adequate psychometric properties (internal consistency, convergent, and discriminant validity). The 4-factor model of the rMCI was partially invariant across the two ethnic groups and full measurement invariance was established across gender. [less ▲]

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See detailPerception of immigration to Iceland: The host country perspective
Murdock, Elke UL

in Meckl, Markus; Gunnþórsdóttir, Hermina (Eds.) Samfélag fjölbreytileikans: Samskipti heimamanna og innflytjenda á Íslandi. (2020)

With 35.5 immigrants per 1000 inhabitants, Iceland had the third highest number of immigrants per inhabitants in Europe in 2018. Until the turn of the century, the foreign population percentage in Iceland ... [more ▼]

With 35.5 immigrants per 1000 inhabitants, Iceland had the third highest number of immigrants per inhabitants in Europe in 2018. Until the turn of the century, the foreign population percentage in Iceland was around 2%. In the last 5 years, this percentage has risen steadily to nearly 14% in 2020. How is this rapid rise in immigration experienced by the host country population? How are immigrants perceived and what are expectations in terms of behavior? The Inclusive Societies – Iceland project investigated both, the immigrants’ situation in Iceland, but also the native populations’ attitude towards immigration and immigrants. It is important to take the host country perspective into consideration, as diversity ideologies will also determine the acculturation options for minorities. A quantitative survey was conducted among 3630 native Icelanders (51.1% women, MAge = 50.8, SD = 15.6), spread across all regions of Iceland. The questions covered a range of domains pertinent to life in Iceland. In this Chapter only the questions pertaining directly to immigration and immigrants are analyzed. The results indicate that culture contact takes place – with, over two thirds of participants indicating that they have invited immigrants to their home and slightly under two thirds having been invited to immigrants’ homes. Overall, the perception is that immigrants have made a positive impact to communities. The vast majority of participants expect immigrants to learn Icelandic. The greatest divergence of views was found concerning the question, if immigrants should adopt Icelandic customs and values. The findings will be discussed in light of policy implications. [less ▲]

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See detailDigitale Kommunikation im Alter – Erste Ergebnisse der CRISIS-Studie
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer ... [more ▼]

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer Kontakte berichtet. Die vorliegende Studie liefert erste Hinweise darauf, inwiefern sich das Kommunikationsverhalten älterer Menschen während der COVID-19 Krise verändert hat, wie der Gebrauch verschiedener Kommunikationsmittel mit der Reduktion von Einsamkeit und sozialer Isolation zusammenhängt und ob digitale Medien traditionelle Formen der Kommunikation verdrängen oder ergänzen. Im Juni 2020 wurden im Rahmen des vom FNR Luxemburg geförderten CRISIS-Projekts N = 611 in Privathaushalten lebende Personen im Alter zwischen 60 und 98 Jahren zu ihrem Erleben während der COVID-19 Krise befragt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass das Telefon insgesamt zwar weiterhin das wichtigste Kommunikationsmittel älterer Menschen bleibt, jedoch nehmen digitale Medien insbesondere in der Gruppe der 60-69-jährigen einen wichtigen Stellenwert ein, um mit anderen in Kontakt zu bleiben. Dabei reduzierte ein gestiegener Gebrauch digitaler Medien (wie auch traditioneller Medien) das Gefühl, nicht genug Gesellschaft zu haben. Außerdem scheinen neue Arten der Kommunikation traditionelle Arten in unserer Zielgruppe nicht zu ersetzen, sondern sie ergänzen sich gegenseitig. Die Ergebnisse werden mit Bezug auf Maßnahmen zur Reduktion sozialer Isolation und Einsamkeit im Alter und im Kontext von COVID-19 diskutiert. [less ▲]

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