References of "Meyer, Andrea H."
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See detailPerseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
Sorg, Sonja UL; Vögele, Claus UL; Furka, Nadine et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2012), 3

The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would ... [more ▼]

The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants’ age ranged from 16 to 49 years with a mean age of 21.1 years (SD = 3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that negative affectivity was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA – anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive mediation of clinical improvement after intensive exposure-based therapy of agoraphobia and social phobia
Vögele, Claus UL; Ehlers, Anke; Meyer, Andrea H. et al

in Depression and Anxiety (2010), (27), 294-301

Background: The present study investigated cognitive mediation of clinical improvement in patients with agoraphobia (N5427) or social phobia (N598) receiving high-density exposure therapy in a ... [more ▼]

Background: The present study investigated cognitive mediation of clinical improvement in patients with agoraphobia (N5427) or social phobia (N598) receiving high-density exposure therapy in a naturalistic clinical treatment setting. Methods: Patients were assessed before therapy, 6 weeks after the end of therapy, and 1 year thereafter, using a self-report assessment battery. Lower level mediation analyses provided support for the notion that cognitive changes partially mediate clinical improvement after exposure therapy. Results: Changes in cognitions relating to physical catastrophes mediated treatment outcome only for patients with agoraphobia, whereas changes in cognitions about loss of control mediated outcome for both agoraphobia and social phobia patients. Changes in relationship satisfaction did not mediate symptomatic improvement. Conclusions: The results extend previous findings by demonstrating mediation in an unselected clinical sample and by providing evidence for the specificity of mediation effects. They further support the importance of cognitive changes in cognitive–behavior therapy. Depression and Anxiety 27:294–301, 2010. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily structure, body mass index and eating behaviour
Hasenböhler, Kathrin; Munsch, Simone; Meyer, Andrea H. et al

in International Journal of Eating Disorders (2009), 42

Objective: To explore associations between family structure, children’s body mass index (BMI), and eating behaviors of children and their mothers. Method: Fifty-seven mothers and their children took part ... [more ▼]

Objective: To explore associations between family structure, children’s body mass index (BMI), and eating behaviors of children and their mothers. Method: Fifty-seven mothers and their children took part in an experimental study. BMI of children was measured. Mothers were asked to provide self- report data on sociodemographic back- ground, mental health, and eating behaviors about themselves and their children. Parent-child-dyads represented their family structure using the Family System Test. Results: We found negative associations in typical family situations between family hierarchy and children’s BMI, mothers’ emotional eating and mothers’ restrained eating. Family cohesion and restrained eating of the children were also negatively correlated. We obtained positive associa- tions in typical and conflict family situa- tions between family cohesion and external eating of the children. Discussion: We found indications that family structure is associated with overweight and with eating behavior in children and their mothers. VC 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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