References of "Menheere, Daphne"
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See detailDesigning for Qualitative Interfaces: Experiences from Studio Education
Lockton, Dan; Lallemand, Carine UL; Menheere, Daphne

Scientific Conference (in press)

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See detailAsynja: Sensorial Design for Running Motivation
Menheere, Daphne; Hilderink, Myrthe; Vos, Steven et al

in IASDR 2021: 9th Congress of the International Association of Societies of Design Research (in press)

If starting to run is an easy decision, committing to a long-term running routine proves to be a more challenging endeavor for many people. In this pictorial, we unravel the design process of Asynja, an ... [more ▼]

If starting to run is an easy decision, committing to a long-term running routine proves to be a more challenging endeavor for many people. In this pictorial, we unravel the design process of Asynja, an artefact that triggers exercise imagery by using natural scents related to running. Relying on peripheral interaction, this research probe subtly nudges users to go running, thereby supporting them to transform their positive intentions into actions. Exploring sensoriality as a design opportunity for behavior change interventions, we invite the community to expand the design space of exercise-related motivational products and systems. [less ▲]

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See detailRaya: A Tangible Sports Buddy Reminding Oneself of the Commitment to Exercise
Menheere, Daphne; de Haan, Alynne; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

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See detailLaina: Dynamic Data Physicalization for Slow Exercising Feedback
Menheere, Daphne; Van Hartingsveldt, Evianne; Birkebæk, Mads et al

in DIS '21: Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2021 (2021)

The increased popularity of recreational sports, like running, led to the development of numerous technologies supporting people in their training. However, in their current form and interaction, these ... [more ▼]

The increased popularity of recreational sports, like running, led to the development of numerous technologies supporting people in their training. However, in their current form and interaction, these take a rather standardized approach focusing on quantified data tracking displayed through screens or audio. In this paper, we explore how dynamic data physicalization through a shape-changing interface can open the design space of exercise feedback. Relying on an expert study on the aesthetics of interaction (N=23), we designed Laina, a shape-changing art piece presenting physicalized running data through a slow feedback mechanism. We deployed Laina at 3 participant's home, during a series of 3-weeks field studies. Results show that Laina allows for deep reflection, anticipation and exploration of running behavior. The aim of our paper is to provide insights on the use of slow feedback mechanisms for exercise-related products, through the design of a dynamic data physicalization artefact. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailRaya: A Tangible Exercise Buddy Reminding Oneself of the Commitment to Exercise
Menheere, Daphne; de Haan, Alynne; Vos, Steven et al

in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2021)

Although many people have a positive intention to be more active, a key challenge remains to turn this intention into action. Social support as a motivational strategy can increase adherence in exercise ... [more ▼]

Although many people have a positive intention to be more active, a key challenge remains to turn this intention into action. Social support as a motivational strategy can increase adherence in exercise and can be provided by relational agents as a substitute for human coaches. We first conducted an exploratory two-week user study, to explore how emotional design and tangible interaction influences experience and motivation to exercise. We then designed a propositional research object Raya, a tangible exercise buddy that helps one to realize their workout by reminding them of their goals and self-commitment. We invite designers to bridge the gap in the design space of sport-related technologies by designing tangible artefacts embedding supportive and qualitative aesthetics of interaction rather than focusing on performance. © 2021, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing. [less ▲]

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See detailA Diary Study on the Exercise Intention-Behaviour Gap: Implications for the Design of Interactive Products
Menheere, Daphne; Funk, Matthias; van der Spek, Erik et al

in DRS International Conference 2020 (2020)

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called ... [more ▼]

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called intention-behaviour gap. To investigate barriers and enablers that affect this gap, we conducted a 7-day diary study with 16 participants. In this study, participants indicated what their exercise intentions and behaviour were per day, and whether and why they changed retrospectively during the day. Through the diary study, we gain insights into (i) the intention-behaviour interplay, and (ii) the experienced barriers and enablers that influence this interplay throughout the day. Based on the findings, we contribute new implications for design in supporting people translating their intentions into exercise behaviour, and propose three design concepts as examples. In these, the focus is on positively influencing the interplay of enablers and barriers of exercising and how these can be exemplified through design. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Runner's Journey: Identifying Design Opportunities for Running Motivation Technology
Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL; Van Der Spek, Erik et al

in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2020)

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related ... [more ▼]

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related devices that aim to motivate runners, these often focus on the training itself and not on overcoming the barriers experienced prior to the run. A better understanding of these barriers to running is essential to identify design opportunities for technologies supporting amateur runners. We conducted two complementary studies among participants of a women-only running event. Combining an online survey (N = 114) and a journey mapping activity (N = 13), we investigated the influence of motivational barriers and enablers in runners' rituals. Based on our findings, we created the Runner's Journey, a visual narrative highlighting actionable design opportunities for running motivation technology. We propose five design recommendations to overcome barriers among amateur runners. © 2020 ACM. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailRunner's Perceptions of Reasons to Quit Running: Influence of Gender, Age and Running-Related Characteristics.
Menheere, Daphne; Janssen, Mark; Funk, Mathias et al

in International journal of environmental research and public health (2020), 17(17),

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as ... [more ▼]

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as running, has increased. Running is known for its low threshold to start and its attractiveness for a heterogeneous group of people. Yet, one can still observe high drop-out rates among (novice) runners. To understand the reasons for drop-out as perceived by runners, we investigate potential reasons to quit running among short distance runners (5 km and 10 km) (n = 898). Data used in this study were drawn from the standardized online Eindhoven Running Survey 2016 (ERS16). Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate the relation between reasons to quit running and different variables like socio-demographic variables, running habits and attitudes, interests, and opinions (AIOs) on running. Our results indicate that, not only people of different gender and age show significant differences in perceived reasons to quit running, also running habits, (e.g., running context and frequency) and AIOs are related to perceived reasons to quit running too. With insights into these related variables, potential drop-out reasons could help health professionals in understanding and lowering drop-out rates among recreational runners. [less ▲]

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See detailGraceful Interactions and Social Support as Motivational Design Strategies to Encourage Women in Exercising
Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL; Faber, Ilse et al

Scientific Conference (2019, November)

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. Yet the main challenge remains to translate these intentions into action. Wearable devices supporting ... [more ▼]

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. Yet the main challenge remains to translate these intentions into action. Wearable devices supporting exercise regrettably tend to adopt a one-size-fits-all approach by monitoring activity through quantified data as a motivation strategy. Since certain individuals are driven by social motives to exercise, less addressed through quantification, the impact of these devices on user experience and motivation is questionable. We contribute to the field by defining interaction attributes of graceful interactions in product design. We then embedded these in designing Grace, a piece of jewelry enabling women to share exercise intentions with friends to encourage social support. Instead of focusing on quantification, we rely on a qualitative approach using graceful interaction. Through this we extend the design space of sport-related wearables for women and inform how to design for exercise motivation through social support and graceful interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailGrace: Designing for Exercise Motivation Through Social Support and Graceful Interactions
Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL; Faber, Ilse et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

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