References of "Massard, Gilbert 50035775"
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See detailTraining Curriculum for European Thoracic Surgeons: A Joint Initiative of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Respiratory Society
Massard, Gilbert UL; Tabin, Nathalie; Konge, Lars et al

in European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (2020)

Because of the differing definitions of the margins of thoracic surgery as a specialty and the variability in the training curricula among European countries, the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons ... [more ▼]

Because of the differing definitions of the margins of thoracic surgery as a specialty and the variability in the training curricula among European countries, the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons formed a task force to elaborate a consensual proposal. The first step comprised creating a harmonized syllabus that was completed and published in 2018. This publication presents a proposal for a curriculum upon which the task force and the external expert reviewers have agreed. The curriculum was developed by the task force: each module and item describe the expected level of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be attained by the participants; learning opportunities, assessment tools and minimal clinical exposures have been defined as well. Competence in terms of non-technical skills has been defined for each module according to the CanMEDS (http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/canmeds/canmeds-framework-e) glossary. The different modules were subsequently submitted to an internal and an external review process and re-edited accordingly before final validation. The authors hope that this document will serve as a roadmap for both thoracic surgical trainees and mentors. It should further guide continuous professional development. However, evolving scientific and technological advances are expected to modify the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders in the future and hence will mandate periodical revisions of the document. [less ▲]

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See detailA Pathway to Keep All Lifelong Learners Up to Date: The ERS Continuing Professional Development Programme
Farr, Amy; Aliberti, Stefano; Loukides, Stelios et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2020)

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See detailOrganized Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Lung Transplantation: Study of Glycemic Control and Patient Survival in a Single Center
Riou, Marianne; Renaud-Picard, Benjamin; Munch, Marion et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2019)

Objective: To study patient survival and glycemic control before and after lung transplantation (LTx) according to the diabetes status in patients submitted to an organized management of diabetes mellitus ... [more ▼]

Objective: To study patient survival and glycemic control before and after lung transplantation (LTx) according to the diabetes status in patients submitted to an organized management of diabetes mellitus (DM) at the Strasbourg University Hospital, France. Material and methods: Two hundred and sixty-seven LTx recipients were included retrospectively and analyzed according to diabetes status: pretransplant diabetes, new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT) or no diabetes. Organized DM management was coordinated by a diabetologist trained in DM management before and after transplantation and included pretransplant screening, a close monitoring of glycemia after transplant and optimized treatment before and after LTx. Results: DM was well-controlled after transplantation: mean glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose levels after LTx were 5.8 ± 0.2% and 5.4 ± 0.1 mmol/L respectively, in pretransplant DM patients and 5.7 ± 0.1% and 5.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L respectively, in NODAT patients. The overall median survival time was 8.3 ± 1.9 years. Pretransplant DM increased the risk of mortality (1.82-fold increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.06; P = .02) in LTx recipients. Conclusions: Organized management of diabetes achieved very satisfactory glycemic control in both pretransplant DM and NODAT patients. However, no specific protocols have been created for managing DM following LTx. As DM continues to become an increasing comorbidity in LTx, there exist a significant need of studies in this area. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Donor, Recipient and Matching on Survival After High Emergency Lung Transplantation in France
Roussel, Arnaud; Sage, Edouard; Massard, Gilbert UL et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2019)

Introduction: Since July 2007, the French high emergency lung transplantation (HELT) allocation procedure prioritises available lung grafts to waiting patients with imminent risk of death. The relative ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Since July 2007, the French high emergency lung transplantation (HELT) allocation procedure prioritises available lung grafts to waiting patients with imminent risk of death. The relative impacts of donor, recipient and matching on the outcome following HELT remain unknown. We aimed at deciphering the relative impacts of donor, recipient and matching on the outcome following HELT in an exhaustive administrative database. Methods: All lung transplantations performed in France were prospectively registered in an administrative database. We retrospectively reviewed the procedures performed between July 2007 and December 2015, and analysed the impact of donor, recipient and matching on overall survival after the HELT procedure by fitting marginal Cox models. Results: During the study period, 2335 patients underwent lung transplantation in 11 French centres. After exclusion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema, 1544 patients were included: 503 HELT and 1041 standard lung transplantation allocations. HELT was associated with a hazard ratio for death of 1.41 (95% CI 1.22-1.64; p<0.0001) in univariate analysis, decreasing to 1.32 (95% CI 1.10-1.60) after inclusion of recipient characteristics in a multivariate model. A donor score computed to predict long-term survival was significantly different between the HELT and standard lung transplantation groups (p=0.014). However, the addition of donor characteristics to recipient characteristics in the multivariate model did not change the hazard ratio associated with HELT. Conclusions: This exhaustive French national study suggests that HELT is associated with an adverse outcome compared with regular allocation. This adverse outcome is mainly related to the severity status of the recipients rather than donor or matching characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiple Lung Transplant in a Patient Within 25 Years: A Case Report
Zhang, Min; SecoAntunes, Ana Rita; Kessler, Romain et al

in Experimental and Clinical Transplantation (2019)

With survival after retransplant improving over the years, issues regarding multiple retransplant have emerged. Here, we report the 25-year follow-up of a 16-year-old male patient who received 4 ... [more ▼]

With survival after retransplant improving over the years, issues regarding multiple retransplant have emerged. Here, we report the 25-year follow-up of a 16-year-old male patient who received 4 successful lung transplant procedures in 1990, 1991, 1995, and 2005. [less ▲]

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See detailPatients Treated for Central Airway Stenosis After Lung Transplantation Have Persistent Airflow Limitation
Mazzetta, Andrea; Porzio, Michele; Riou, Marianne et al

in Annals of Transplantation: Quarterly of the Polish Transplantation Society (2019)

BACKGROUND: Although central airway stenosis (CAS) is a common complication after lung transplantation, its consequences have been poorly evaluated. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although central airway stenosis (CAS) is a common complication after lung transplantation, its consequences have been poorly evaluated. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of CAS on lung function after lung transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All lung transplant recipients from June 2009 to August 2014 in a single center (Strasbourg, France) were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 191 lung transplantations were performed: 175 bilateral, 15 single, and 1 heart-lung transplantation. Of the 161 bilateral lung-transplanted patients who survived >3 months, 22 (13.6%) developed CAS requiring endobronchial treatment. All these patients were treated by endoscopic balloon dilatation, and 9 additionally needed endobronchial stents. Respiratory function tests demonstrated persistent obstructive ventilatory pattern despite endoscopic treatment in recipients with CAS compared to those without CAS at 6, 12, and 18 months post-transplant. At 18 months, CAS patients had significantly lower post-transplant FEV1 (1.96±0.60 L versus 2.57±0.76 L, p=0.001) and FEV1/FVC (61±14% versus 81±13%, p<0.001). The percentage of patients hospitalized for respiratory infections and number of hospital days were significantly increased in recipients with CAS (20 [91%] versus 92 [66%] p=0.036, and 144±110 days versus 103±83 days p=0.042, respectively). Survival in transplant recipients did not significantly differ between those with CAS and those without. CONCLUSIONS: CAS after lung transplantation was not associated with worse survival, but it did have a significant and persistent effect on lung function, and was associated with increased rate of respiratory infection. [less ▲]

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See detailSurgical Stabilization for Multiple Rib Fractures: Whom the Benefit? -A Prospective Observational Study
Olland, Anne; Puyraveau, Marc; Guinard, Sophie et al

in Journal of Thoracic Disease (2019)

Background: Surgical repair has demonstrated a beneficial effect on outcome for patients presenting with flail chest or with multiple rib fractures. We hypothesized that benefit on outcome parameters ... [more ▼]

Background: Surgical repair has demonstrated a beneficial effect on outcome for patients presenting with flail chest or with multiple rib fractures. We hypothesized that benefit on outcome parameters concerns predominantly patients being extubated within 24 hours post-operatively. Methods: We prospectively recorded all patients presenting with chest traumatism eligible for surgical repair with anticipated early extubation according to our institutional consensus (flail chest, major deformity, poor pain control, associated lesions requiring thoracotomy). We compared outcomes of patients extubated within 24 hours post-operatively to those who required prolonged ventilator support. We tested predictive factors for prolonged intubation with univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: From 2010 to 2014, 132 patients required surgical repair. Two thirds were extubated within 24 hours following surgical repair. Pneumonia was the main complication and occurred in 30.3% of all patients. Patients extubated within 24 hours following surgical repair had significantly shorter ICU stay and shorter in-hospital stay (P<0.0001 both). Pneumonia occurred significantly more often in patients with longer mechanical ventilation (over 24 hours) (P<0.0001) and the overall post-operative complications rate was higher (P=0.0001). Main independent risk factors for delayed extubation were bilateral chest rib fractures and initially associated pneumothorax. Conclusions: We conclude that patients extubated within 24 hours after repair have an improved outcome with reduced complication rate and shorter hospital stay. The initial extent of the trauma is an important risk factor for delayed extubation and high complication rate despite surgical stabilization. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Lung Transplantation, Are Pulmonary Grafts From Donors Deceased From Hanging as Suitable as Grafts From Donors Deceased From Other Causes?
Santos Silva, João; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert UL et al

in Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (2019)

A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether pulmonary grafts from donors deceased from hanging offer the same benefit as grafts from donors ... [more ▼]

A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether pulmonary grafts from donors deceased from hanging offer the same benefit as grafts from donors deceased from other causes in lung transplantation. Of the 17papers found, 4 provided the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal, country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. One study reported a large cohort of donors and analysed the out-comes by cause of death, reporting no differences in survival. The remaining 3 papers analysed observational studies on the outcomes of lung transplantation using pulmonary grafts from donors deceased from hanging, compared with donors deceased from other causes. No differences in the rates of post-transplantation pulmonary graft dysfunction and long-term overall survival were reported. Although the cohort of donors deceased from hanging is small, we conclude that these donors are an important contribution to the donor pool. Ex vivo lung perfusion may have a role in assessing graft viability in this scenario [less ▲]

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See detailContinuous Professional Development: Elevating Thoracic Oncology Education in Europe
van Geffen, Wouter H; Blum, Torsten G; Aliberti, Stefano et al

in Breathe (2019), 15(4),

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