References of "Martin, Benoît"
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See detailHeat is in the Eye of the Beholder: Towards Better Authenticating on Smartglasses
Gheorghe, Gabriela UL; Louveton, Nicolas UL; Martin, Benoît et al

in Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human System Interaction (HSI'16) (2016, July)

Smart and wearable devices are trendy electronic objects that have become increasingly popular in recent years. Those devices are, by definition, tightly connected with the user's personal activities ... [more ▼]

Smart and wearable devices are trendy electronic objects that have become increasingly popular in recent years. Those devices are, by definition, tightly connected with the user's personal activities. Authentication is therefore a critical feature for both identifying users and personalizing the services on the device. In particular, the emergence of smartglasses changed the way we thought a wearable could assist users in their daily activities. As designed by commercial providers, smartglasses are sold with a very specific set of interactions capabilities. These capabilities have a strong impact on how comfortably or safely users may authenticate to their smartglasses. For this reason, we investigate in this paper the different authentication methods available for smartphones and we comparatively position the smartglasses in the design space of authentication methods. We propose a new approach based on touch input on an arbitrary surface using thermal camera input. This approach aims to circumvent the lack of touch surface provided by smartglasses, while maintaining an acceptable level of security. [less ▲]

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See detailNot a Tile Out of Place: Toward Creating Context-Dependent User Interfaces on Smartglasses
Pecci, Isabelle; Martin, Benoît; Kacem, Imed et al

in Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human System Interaction (HSI'16) (2016, July)

Despite the rapid pace of gadgets released on the market, research in the area of usable interfaces for wearables is lagging behind. Smartglasses are new wearables that embed diverse sensors but also have ... [more ▼]

Despite the rapid pace of gadgets released on the market, research in the area of usable interfaces for wearables is lagging behind. Smartglasses are new wearables that embed diverse sensors but also have small displays, and this makes it hard for the wearer to visualize real-time data. To bridge this gap, the contribution of this paper is threefold. First, we propose a data representation model to combine applications and services that match user activities and contexts. Second, we present an approach of showing relevant services to the user based on 'tiles' (such as those in recent Microsoft Windows interfaces) while considering the device constraints. Finally, we suggest that combining those two aspects can open the way to personalized services for the end user, creating new ways of interacting with applications and devices. [less ▲]

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See detailText entry on smart glasses A comparison of two input techniques
Mccall, Roderick UL; Popleteev, Andrei UL; Martin, Benoit et al

in 8th International Conference on Human System Interaction (HSI'2015) (2015, June)

This paper presents a comparative pilot usability study of Dasher and an on-screen keyboard on a head-mounted display. Interaction logging data was captured along with subjective responses (via the SUS ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a comparative pilot usability study of Dasher and an on-screen keyboard on a head-mounted display. Interaction logging data was captured along with subjective responses (via the SUS questionnaire). The results indicate that there is a strong need to develop text entry systems for smart glasses rather to simply adopt those that are already available. However, both approaches are useful when there is a need to enter private or sensitive data. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes
Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Melanie UL et al

in Nature Genetics (2014), 46(12), 1327-32

Febrile seizures affect 2–4% of all children1 and have a strong genetic component2. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)3, 4, 5 have been identified that cause febrile ... [more ▼]

Febrile seizures affect 2–4% of all children1 and have a strong genetic component2. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)3, 4, 5 have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B6, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees7, 8 identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes. [less ▲]

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