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See detailWeighted numbers: Commentary on “The Number Sense Represents (Rational) Numbers” by Sam Clarke and Jacob Beck
Marinova, Mila UL; Fedele, Marta; Reynvoet, Bert

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2021)

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See detailMapping between number notations in kindergarten and the role of home numeracy
Marinova, Mila UL; Reynvoet, Bert; Sasanguie, Delphine

in Cognitive Development (2021)

Two recent studies investigated how children learn to map between digits, number words, and dots (Hurst, Anderson, & Cordes, 2017; Jim´enez Lira, Carver, Douglas, & LeFevre, 2017). In the current study we ... [more ▼]

Two recent studies investigated how children learn to map between digits, number words, and dots (Hurst, Anderson, & Cordes, 2017; Jim´enez Lira, Carver, Douglas, & LeFevre, 2017). In the current study we aimed to replicate these previous findings by examining a much larger sample (N = 195 kindergarteners, aged 2 years 6 months to 5 years 2 months) and taking into account home numeracy activities, that is, daily parent-child interactions with numerical content. In line with previous studies, the results showed that children first learn to map number words onto dots, and number words onto digits, and only afterwards – to map digits onto dots. Furthermore, number words ↔ digits mapping was a better mediator of the relation between digits ↔ dots and the dots ↔ number words mapping tasks, than the dots ↔ number words, suggesting that children rely on their symbolic number knowledge to learn the relation between digits and dots. Finally, both basic and advanced home numeracy activities were positively related to children’s mappings skills. Furthermore, we observed that with increasing the children’s age a shift from basic to advanced activities was present. These results emphasize the importance of tailoring the home numeracy activities according to children’s age. [less ▲]

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See detailCan You Trust Your Number Sense: Distinct Processing of Numbers and Quantities in Elementary School Children
Marinova, Mila UL; Reynvoet, Bert

in Journal of Numerical Cognition (2020), 6(3), 304-321

Theories of number development have traditionally argued that the acquisition and discrimination of symbolic numbers (i.e., number words and digits) are grounded in and are continuously supported by the ... [more ▼]

Theories of number development have traditionally argued that the acquisition and discrimination of symbolic numbers (i.e., number words and digits) are grounded in and are continuously supported by the Approximate Number System (ANS)—an evolutionarily ancient system for number. In the current study, we challenge this claim by investigating whether the ANS continues to support the symbolic number processing throughout development. To this end, we tested 87 first- (Age M = 6.54 years, SD = 0.58), third- (Age M = 8.55 years, SD = 0.60) and fifth-graders (Age M = 10.63 years, SD = 0.67) on four audio-visual comparison tasks (1) Number words–Digits, (2) Tones–Dots,(3) Number words–Dots, (4) Tones–Digits, while varying the Number Range (Small and Large), and the Numerical Ratio (Easy, Medium,and Hard). Results showed that larger and faster developmental growth in the performance was observed in the Number Words–Digits task, while the tasks containing at least one non-symbolic quantity showed smaller and slower developmental change. In addition, the Ratio effect (i.e., the signature of ANS being addressed) was present in the Tones–Dots, Tones–Digits, and Number Words–Dots tasks, but was absent in the Number Words–Digits task. These findings suggest that it is unlikely that the ANS continuously underlines the acquisition and the discrimination of the symbolic numbers. Rather, our results indicate that non-symbolic quantities and symbolic numbers follow qualitatively distinct developmental paths, and argue that the latter ones are processed in a semantic network which starts to emerge from an early age. [less ▲]

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