References of "Magnusdottir, Stefania 50002257"
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See detailThe Virtual Metabolic Human database: integrating human and gut microbiome metabolism with nutrition and disease
Noronha, Alberto UL; Modamio Chamarro, Jennifer UL; Jarosz, Yohan UL et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2018)

A multitude of factors contribute to complex diseases and can be measured with ‘omics’ methods. Databases facilitate data interpretation for underlying mechanisms. Here, we describe the Virtual Metabolic ... [more ▼]

A multitude of factors contribute to complex diseases and can be measured with ‘omics’ methods. Databases facilitate data interpretation for underlying mechanisms. Here, we describe the Virtual Metabolic Human (VMH, www.vmh.life) database encapsulating current knowledge of human metabolism within five interlinked resources ‘Human metabolism’, ‘Gut microbiome’, ‘Disease’, ‘Nutrition’, and ‘ReconMaps’. The VMH captures 5180 unique metabolites, 17 730 unique reactions, 3695 human genes, 255 Mendelian diseases, 818 microbes, 632 685 microbial genes and 8790 food items. The VMH’s unique features are (i) the hosting of the metabolic reconstructions of human and gut microbes amenable for metabolic modeling; (ii) seven human metabolic maps for data visualization; (iii) a nutrition designer; (iv) a user-friendly webpage and application-programming interface to access its content; (v) user feedback option for community engagement and (vi) the connection of its entities to 57 other web resources. The VMH represents a novel, interdisciplinary database for data interpretation and hypothesis generation to the biomedical community. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling metabolism of the human gut microbiome
Magnusdottir, Stefania UL; Thiele, Ines UL

in Current Opinion in Biotechnology (2018)

The human gut microbiome plays an important part in human health. The complexity of the microbiome makes it difficult to determine the detailed metabolic functions and cross-talk occurs between the ... [more ▼]

The human gut microbiome plays an important part in human health. The complexity of the microbiome makes it difficult to determine the detailed metabolic functions and cross-talk occurs between the individual species. In silico systems biology studies of the microbiome can help to identify metabolite exchanges among gut microbes. Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis methods use biochemically accurate genome-scale metabolic networks of microorganisms to simulate metabolism between species in a given microbiome and help generate novel hypotheses on microbial interactions. Here, we review metabolic modeling studies that have investigated metabolic functions of the gut microbiome. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneration of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for 773 members of the human gut microbiota
Magnusdottir, Stefania UL; Heinken, Almut Katrin UL; Kutt, Laura et al

in Nature Biotechnology (2016)

Genome-scale metabolic models derived from human gut metagenomic data can be used as a framework to elucidate how microbial communities modulate human metabolism and health. We present AGORA (assembly of ... [more ▼]

Genome-scale metabolic models derived from human gut metagenomic data can be used as a framework to elucidate how microbial communities modulate human metabolism and health. We present AGORA (assembly of gut organisms through reconstruction and analysis), a resource of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions semi-automatically generated for 773 human gut bacteria. Using this resource, we identified a defined growth medium for Bacteroides caccae ATCC 34185. We also showed that interactions among modeled species depend on both the metabolic potential of each species and the nutrients available. AGORA reconstructions can integrate either metagenomic or 16S rRNA sequencing data sets to infer the metabolic diversity of microbial communities. AGORA reconstructions could provide a starting point for the generation of high-quality, manually curated metabolic reconstructions. AGORA is fully compatible with Recon 2, a comprehensive metabolic reconstruction of human metabolism, which will facilitate studies of host–microbiome interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailSystematic genome assessment of B-vitamin biosynthesis suggests co-operation among gut microbes
Magnusdottir, Stefania UL; Ravcheev, Dmitry UL; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie et al

in Frontiers in Genetics (2015), 6

The human gut microbiota supplies its host with essential nutrients, including B-vitamins. Using the PubSEED platform, we systematically assessed the genomes of 256 common human gut bacteria for the ... [more ▼]

The human gut microbiota supplies its host with essential nutrients, including B-vitamins. Using the PubSEED platform, we systematically assessed the genomes of 256 common human gut bacteria for the presence of biosynthesis pathways for eight B-vitamins: biotin, cobalamin, folate, niacin, pantothenate, pyridoxine, riboflavin, and thiamin. On the basis of the presence and absence of genome annotations, we predicted that each of the eight vitamins was produced by 40–65% of the 256 human gut microbes. The distribution of synthesis pathways was diverse; some genomes had all eight biosynthesis pathways, whereas others contained no de novo synthesis pathways. We compared our predictions to experimental data from 16 organisms and found 88% of our predictions to be in agreement with published data. In addition, we identified several pairs of organisms whose vitamin synthesis pathway pattern complemented those of other organisms. This analysis suggests that human gut bacteria actively exchange B-vitamins among each other, thereby enabling the survival of organisms that do not synthesize any of these essential cofactors. This result indicates the co-evolution of the gut microbes in the human gut environment. Our work presents the first comprehensive assessment of the B-vitamin synthesis capabilities of the human gut microbiota. We propose that in addition to diet, the gut microbiota is an important source of B-vitamins, and that changes in the gut microbiota composition can severely affect our dietary B-vitamin requirements. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic differentiation of gastrointestinal microbes is reflected in their encoded metabolic repertoires
Bauer, Eugen UL; Laczny, Cedric Christian UL; Magnusdottir, Stefania UL et al

in Microbiome (2015), 3(55), 1-13

Background: The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse microbial community, in which metabolic phenotypes play important roles for the human host. Recent developments in meta-omics attempt to ... [more ▼]

Background: The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse microbial community, in which metabolic phenotypes play important roles for the human host. Recent developments in meta-omics attempt to unravel metabolic roles of microbes by linking genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. This connection, however, still remains poorly understood with respect to its evolutionary and ecological context. Results: We generated automatically refined draft genome-scale metabolic models of 301 representative intestinal microbes in silico. We applied a combination of unsupervised machine-learning and systems biology techniques to study individual and global differences in genomic content and inferred metabolic capabilities. Based on the global metabolic differences, we found that energy metabolism and membrane synthesis play important roles in delineating different taxonomic groups. Furthermore, we found an exponential relationship between phylogeny and the reaction composition, meaning that closely related microbes of the same genus can exhibit pronounced differences with respect to their metabolic capabilities while at the family level only marginal metabolic differences can be observed. This finding was further substantiated by the metabolic divergence within different genera. In particular, we could distinguish three sub-type clusters based on membrane and energy metabolism within the Lactobacilli as well as two clusters within the Bifidobacteria and Bacteroides. Conclusions: We demonstrate that phenotypic differentiation within closely related species could be explained by their metabolic repertoire rather than their phylogenetic relationships. These results have important implications in our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary complexity of the human gastrointestinal microbiome. [less ▲]

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