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See detailShort- and long-term outcome of chronic pallidal neurostimulation in monogenic isolated dystonia
Bruggemann, N.; Kuhn, A.; Schneider, S. A. et al

in Neurology (2015), 84(9), 895-903

OBJECTIVES: Deep brain stimulation of the internal pallidum (GPi-DBS) is an established therapeutic option in treatment-refractory dystonia, and the identification of factors predicting surgical outcome ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Deep brain stimulation of the internal pallidum (GPi-DBS) is an established therapeutic option in treatment-refractory dystonia, and the identification of factors predicting surgical outcome is needed to optimize patient selection. METHODS: In this retrospective multicenter study, GPi-DBS outcome of 8 patients with DYT6, 9 with DYT1, and 38 with isolated dystonia without known monogenic cause (non-DYT) was assessed at early (1-16 months) and late (22-92 months) follow-up using Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) scores. RESULTS: At early follow-up, mean reduction of dystonia severity was greater in patients with DYT1 (BFMDRS score: -60%) and non-DYT dystonia (-52%) than in patients with DYT6 dystonia (-32%; p = 0.046). Accordingly, the rate of responders was considerably lower in the latter group (57% vs >90%; p = 0.017). At late follow-up, however, GPi-DBS resulted in comparable improvement in all 3 groups (DYT6, -42%; DYT1, -44; non-DYT, -61%). Additional DBS of the same or another brain target was performed in 3 of 8 patients with DYT6 dystonia with varying results. Regardless of the genotype, patients with a shorter duration from onset of dystonia to surgery had better control of dystonia postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term GPi-DBS is effective in patients with DYT6, DYT1, and non-DYT dystonia. However, the effect of DBS appears to be less predictable in patients with DYT6, suggesting that pre-DBS genetic testing and counseling for known dystonia gene mutations may be indicated. GPi-DBS should probably be considered earlier in the disease course. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class IV evidence that long-term GPi-DBS improves dystonia in patients with DYT1, DYT6, and non-DYT dystonia. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucocerebrosidase mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease population.
Kumar, K. R.; Ramirez, A.; Gobel, A. et al

in European journal of neurology (2013), 20(2), 402-5

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To screen for glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease (PD) population. METHODS: Glucocerebrosidase exons 8-11 harbouring the most common mutations were ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To screen for glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease (PD) population. METHODS: Glucocerebrosidase exons 8-11 harbouring the most common mutations were sequenced in 360 patients with PD and 348 controls from Serbia. Haplotype analysis was performed for the N370S mutation and compared with German and Ashkenazi Jewish carriers. RESULTS: Glucocerebrosidase mutations were significantly more frequent in patients with PD (21/360; 5.8%) vs. controls (5/348; 1.4%; OR = 4.25; CI, 1.58-11.40; P = 0.0041). Two patients with PD carried homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in GBA. The N370S mutation accounted for about half of the mutated alleles in patients (10/23) but was absent amongst controls. Three novel variants were detected including two non-synonymous variants (D380V, N392S) in the patient group and one synonymous change (V459V) in a control. Carriers of the D409H mutation were also sequenced for H255Q, and all were found to carry the [D409H; H255Q] double-mutant allele. Genotyping suggested a common haplotype for all N370S carriers. CONCLUSION: Glucocerebrosidase mutations represent a PD risk factor in the Serbian population. [less ▲]

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See detailRe: Alpha-synuclein gene duplication is present in sporadic Parkinson disease.
Brueggemann, N.; Odin, P.; Grünewald, Anne UL et al

in Neurology (2008), 71(16), 12941294

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (7 UL)