References of "Litina, Anastasia 50002221"
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See detailWhat a Study of 33 Countries Found about Aging Populations and Innovation
Irmen, Andreas UL; Litina, Anastasia UL

in Harvard Business Review (2017)

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See detailpopulation Aging and Inventive Activity
Irmen, Andreas UL; Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2016)

This research empirically establishes and theoretically motivates the hypothesis that population aging has a hump-shaped effect on inventive activity. We estimate this hump-shaped relationship in a panel ... [more ▼]

This research empirically establishes and theoretically motivates the hypothesis that population aging has a hump-shaped effect on inventive activity. We estimate this hump-shaped relationship in a panel of 33 OECD countries over the period 1960-2012. The increasing part of the hump captures the awareness that population aging requires inventive activity to guarantee current and future standards of living. The decreasing part reflects the tendency of aging societies to lose dynamism and the willingness to take risks. Policy-wise our analysis suggests that raising the awareness of individuals about the consequences of population aging may facilitate the adoption of strategies and policies encouraging inventive activity and economic growth. [less ▲]

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See detailDissecting the Act of God: An Exploration of the Effect of Religion on Economic Activity
Litina, Anastasia UL; Carpantier, Jean-Francois UL

Scientific Conference (2015, December)

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long ... [more ▼]

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long lasting effect on the religiosity of migrants. Second, exploiting variations in the inherited component of religiosity of migrants, our analysis uncovers the causal effect of religiosity on economic activity using a panel of countries for the period 1935-2000. The empirical findings suggest that i) church attendance has a positive impact on economic outcomes; ii) religious beliefs in the existence of god, hell, heaven and miracles have no systematic effect on economic outcomes, and iii) stronger faith is associated with prosperity. Moreover we extend our analysis to uncover the channels via which religiosity operates. Notably, the positive effect of religious participation and of stronger faith on economic outcomes operates via the creation of social capital and the development of traits, such as hard work and thrift, that are conducive to growth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 UL)
See detailPopulation Aging and Innovation: Do Old Societies Think New Ideas?
Litina, Anastasia UL; Irmen, Andreas UL

Presentation (2015, June)

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the following three hypotheses: i) population aging has a hump-shaped effect on innovation, ii) old societies foster new ideas, and iii) the effect of population aging on innovation operates partly through a favorable attitude towards new ideas and creativity. Our results falsify the often encountered vision according to which old societies have old ideas. Moreover, they emphasize that innovation activity in aging societies is in part driven by cultural attitudes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (4 UL)
See detailPopulation Aging and Innovation: Do Old Societies Think New Ideas?
Litina, Anastasia UL; Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2015, May)

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the following three hypotheses: i) population aging has a hump-shaped effect on innovation, ii) old societies foster new ideas, and iii) the effect of population aging on innovation operates partly through a favorable attitude towards new ideas and creativity. Our results falsify the often encountered vision according to which old societies have old ideas. Moreover, they emphasize that innovation activity in aging societies is in part driven by cultural attitudes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPopulation Aging and Innovation: Do Old Societies Think New Ideas?
Litina, Anastasia UL; Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2015, March)

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the following three hypotheses: i) population aging has a hump-shaped effect on innovation, ii) old societies foster new ideas, and iii) the effect of population aging on innovation operates partly through a favorable attitude towards new ideas and creativity. Our results falsify the often encountered vision according to which old societies have old ideas. Moreover, they emphasize that innovation activity in aging societies is in part driven by cultural attitudes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Abatement Effective in the Presence of Corruption? A Theoretical Exploration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Sartzetakis, Eftichios; Lapatinas, Athanasios

Scientific Conference (2015)

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of ... [more ▼]

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of public funds to environmental projects aiming not at improving environmental quality, but rather at increasing their ability to extract rents. This type of behavior has a direct and an indirect effect on environmental quality. First, due to extensive rent-seeking, the effectiveness of environmental projects is disproportional to the amount of public funds allocated to them. Second, citizens who observe the poor outcome of environmental projects, increase tax evasion thus reducing public funds. A vicious circle of extensive tax evasion and rent seeking activities emerges, that has a detrimental effect on environmental quality. Anecdotal evidence from a number of countries that experience high levels of corruption, shows little or no improvements in environmental quality despite the implementation of environmental projects. In line with our theoretical findings, this ineffectiveness of the environmental policy is present even when the technology involved is advanced. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
See detailGreat Expectations - The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2015)

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the ... [more ▼]

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the institutions at the host country. This inflated trust of immigrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect. This result is interesting and intriguing for several reasons. First, it highlights the persistent effect of institutions (at the origin country) on the cultural attitudes of immigrants. Interestingly, this effect is rather persistent and can be detected even to the second generation immigrants. Second, the analysis explores whether mean attitudes at the origin country have an effect on immigrants' attitude. The findings suggest that mean attitudes do not confer a statistically significant effect, whereas a horserace between origin institutions and origin culture suggests that it is the effect of institutions that prevails. Last, the analysis establishes that the inflated trust of immigrants affects their political attitudes. Immigrants coming from corrupt countries tend to be less interested in politics, to overtrust the host governments and to be less active in the political arena. In a globalized world where international immigration is rather extensive, pinning down the cultural differences across immigrants and thus the differences in their political attitudes is of an essence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 UL)
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See detailLes sociétés vieillissantes sont-elles favorables aux idées nouvelles?
Irmen, Andreas UL; Litina, Anastasia UL

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 UL)
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See detailGreat Expectations: The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2014, December 04)

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the ... [more ▼]

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the institutions at the host country. This inflated trust of immigrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect. This result is interesting and intriguing for several reasons. First, it highlights the persistent effect of institutions (at the origin country) on the cultural attitudes of immigrants. Interestingly, this effect is rather persistent and can be detected even to the second generation immigrants. Second, the analysis explores whether mean attitudes at the origin country have an effect on immigrants' attitude. The findings suggest that mean attitudes do not confer a statistically significant effect, whereas a horserace between origin institutions and origin culture suggests that it is the effect of institutions that prevails. Last, the analysis establishes that the inflated trust of immigrants affects their political attitudes. Immigrants coming from corrupt countries tend to be less interested in politics, to overtrust the host governments and to be less active in the political arena. In a globalized world where international immigration is rather extensive, pinning down the cultural differences across immigrants and thus the differences in their political attitudes is of an essence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (8 UL)
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See detailThe Geographical Origins of Early State Formation
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2014, December 01)

This research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development, land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood ... [more ▼]

This research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development, land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood. A high degree of land and climatic diversity, and its association with potential gains from trade, accentuated the incentives to develop social, political and physical infrastructure that could facilitate interregional interaction. Hence, the emergence of states was expedited in more diverse geographical environments. To explore the hypotheses the analysis exploits exogenous sources of variation in a) the measure of land variability across countries, and b) climatic variability within countries over the period 500-1500 CE. The research establishes that i) the advent of statehood was expedited in regions characterized by a higher degree of variability in land and climatic conditions, ii) the effect of (land and climatic) variability on statehood operates partly through the advancement of technologies associated with trade, thus suggesting that it is the pivotal role of states in facilitating trade that ultimately contributed to their emergence and consolidation, and, iii) the effect of land variability on statehood dissipates over time. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (7 UL)
See detailPopulation Aging and Innovation: Do Old Societies Think New Ideas?
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2014, November)

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the following three hypotheses: i) population aging has a hump-shaped effect on innovation, ii) old societies foster new ideas, and iii) the effect of population aging on innovation operates partly through a favorable attitude towards new ideas and creativity. Our results falsify the often encountered vision according to which old societies have old ideas. Moreover, they emphasize that innovation activity in aging societies is in part driven by cultural attitudes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (14 UL)
Full Text
See detailIs Abatement Effective in the Presence of Corruption? A Theoretical Exploration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Sartzetakis, Eftichis; Lapatina, Athanasios

E-print/Working paper (2014)

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of ... [more ▼]

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of public funds to environmental projects aiming not at improving environmental quality, but rather at increasing their ability to extract rents. This type of behavior has a direct and an indirect effect on environmental quality. First, due to extensive rent-seeking, the effectiveness of environmental projects is disproportional to the amount of public funds allocated to them. Second, citizens who observe the poor outcome of environmental projects, increase tax evasion thus reducing public funds. A vicious circle of extensive tax evasion and rent seeking activities emerges, that has a detrimental effect on environmental quality. Anecdotal evidence from a number of countries that experience high levels of corruption, shows little or no improvements in environmental quality despite the implementation of environmental projects. In line with our theoretical findings, this ineffectiveness of the environmental policy is present even when the technology involved is advanced. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Abatement Effective in the Presence of Corruption? A Theoretical Exploration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Sartzetakis, Eftichis; Lapatinas, Athanasios

Scientific Conference (2014, November)

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of ... [more ▼]

The paper introduces an additional channel via which corruption may adversely affect environmental quality. It is argued that, in the presence of corruption, politicians may allocate a large fraction of public funds to environmental projects aiming not at improving environmental quality, but rather at increasing their ability to extract rents. This type of behavior has a direct and an indirect effect on environmental quality. First, due to extensive rent-seeking, the effectiveness of environmental projects is disproportional to the amount of public funds allocated to them. Second, citizens who observe the poor outcome of environmental projects, increase tax evasion thus reducing public funds. A vicious circle of extensive tax evasion and rent seeking activities emerges, that has a detrimental effect on environmental quality. Anecdotal evidence from a number of countries that experience high levels of corruption, shows little or no improvements in environmental quality despite the implementation of environmental projects. In line with our theoretical findings, this ineffectiveness of the environmental policy is present even when the technology involved is advanced. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailGreat Expectations: The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2014, September)

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional ... [more ▼]

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional quality at the origin country of a migrant is associated with higher trust towards host country institutions. The inflated trust of migrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect and is intriguing in three respects. First it contradicts with the empirically observed attitude of migrants with respect to interpersonal trust, where low quality of institutions is associated with lower interpersonal trust in both the host and the home country. Second, the inflated trust persists for both first and second generation migrants. Third, the effect of home institutions is stronger than the effect of mean trust at home confirming that institutions prevail over culture. The formation of Great Expectations has profound policy implications as it generates lower demand for regulation and reduced political participation. These findings further highlight the interplay between culture and institutions and the spillover effects of institutions operating via migration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (6 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailPopulation Aging and Innovation Do Old Societies Think New Ideas?
Litina, Anastasia UL; Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2014, July 26)

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that at the individual level "old people think old ideas" whereas at the aggregate level "old societies think new ideas." More precisely, we empirically establish the following three hypotheses: i) population aging has a hump-shaped effect on innovation, ii) old societies think new ideas, and iii) the effect of population aging on innovation operates partly through a favorable attitude towards new ideas and creativity. Our results falsify the often encountered vision according to which old societies think old ideas. Moreover they emphasize that innovation activity in aging societies is in part driven by cultural attitudes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Cultural Transmission of Environmental Preferences: Evidence from International Migration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL; Moriconi, Simone

Scientific Conference (2014, July 15)

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this component, we exploit variation associated with international migration flows. We find that the environmental attitudes of migrants, while being resilient to environmental conditions, also embed a cultural component, which persists till the second generation migrants. Our results suggest that, in the presence of multiple environmental problems that require collective action, comprehending the driving forces behind the formation of an environmental culture is critical to design effective policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGreat Expectations: The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Scientific Conference (2014, July 07)

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional ... [more ▼]

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional quality at the origin country of a migrant is associated with higher trust towards host country institutions. The inflated trust of migrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect and is intriguing in three respects. First it contradicts with the empirically observed attitude of migrants with respect to interpersonal trust, where low quality of institutions is associated with lower interpersonal trust in both the host and the home country. Second, the inflated trust persists for both first and second generation migrants. Third, the effect of home institutions is stronger than the effect of mean trust at home confirming that institutions prevail over culture. The formation of Great Expectations has profound policy implications as it generates lower demand for regulation and reduced political participation. These findings further highlight the interplay between culture and institutions and the spillover effects of institutions operating via migration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Cultural Transmission of Environmental Preferences: Evidence from International Migration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL; Moriconi, Simone

Scientific Conference (2014, June 30)

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this component, we exploit variation associated with international migration flows. We find that the environmental attitudes of migrants, while being resilient to environmental conditions, also embed a cultural component, which persists till the second generation migrants. Our results suggest that, in the presence of multiple environmental problems that require collective action, comprehending the driving forces behind the formation of an environmental culture is critical to design effective policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (8 UL)