References of "Li, Jian"
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See detailThe long shadows of war in China: Battle shocks in early life and health/wealth accumulation
Li, Jian; Koulovatianos, Christos UL

in China Economic Review (2020)

This paper investigates the long-term effects of the 2nd Sino-Japanese war (1937–1945) and the later Chinese Civil War (1946–1950) on health and wealth outcomes of 45+ elder individuals in China. We find ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the long-term effects of the 2nd Sino-Japanese war (1937–1945) and the later Chinese Civil War (1946–1950) on health and wealth outcomes of 45+ elder individuals in China. We find that exposure to the battle shock significantly reduces later adult health outcome such as lung function. Moreover, the later wealth accumulation is also affected negatively. According to our conservative estimates, exposure to battle shock(s) would reduce the lung capability by approximately 5% compared to the population mean and the wealth level by approximately 21% compared to the non-shocked groups. Exploiting the exogenous imposition of wealth equality during the 1950–1978 communism experiment in China, we argue it is the health accumulation channel which inherited the negative battle shocks rather than the wealth accumulation channel. We investigate quantitatively which health-model ingredients can replicate the lifecycle health/wealth dynamics of such early life shocks. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of labor-income risk in household risk-taking
Hubar, Sylwia; Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Li, Jian

in European Economic Review (2020), 129(C),

In fifteen European countries, China, and the US, stocks and business equity as a share of total household assets are represented by an increasing and convex function of income/wealth. A parsimonious ... [more ▼]

In fifteen European countries, China, and the US, stocks and business equity as a share of total household assets are represented by an increasing and convex function of income/wealth. A parsimonious model fitted to the data shows why background labor-income risk can explain much of this risk-taking pattern. Uncontrollable labor-income risk stresses middle-income households more because labor income is a larger fraction of their total lifetime resources compared with the rich. In response, middle-income households reduce (controllable) financial risk. Richer households, having less pressure, can afford more risk-taking. The poor take low risk because they avoid jeopardizing their subsistence consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailDemographics and FDI: Lessons from China's one-child policy
Donaldson, John; Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Li, Jian et al

Article for general public (2018)

China’s one-child policy increased its capital-labour ratio and reduced FDI inflows relative to India, consistent with neoclassical fundamentals

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See detailMarket fragility and the paradox of the recent stock-bond dissonance
Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Li, Jian; Weber, Fabienne UL

in Economics Letters (2018), 162

After the Lehman-Brothers collapse, the stock index has exceeded its pre-Lehman-Brothers peak by 36% in real terms. Seemingly, markets have been demanding more stocks instead of bonds. Yet, instead of ... [more ▼]

After the Lehman-Brothers collapse, the stock index has exceeded its pre-Lehman-Brothers peak by 36% in real terms. Seemingly, markets have been demanding more stocks instead of bonds. Yet, instead of observing higher bond rates, paradoxically, bond rates have been persistently negative after the Lehman-Brothers collapse. To explain this paradox, we suggest that, in the post-Lehman-Brothers period, investors changed their perceptions on disasters, thinking that disasters occur once every 30 years on average, instead of disasters occurring once every 60 years. In our asset-pricing calibration exercise, this rise in perceived market fragility alone can explain the drop in both bond rates and price–dividend ratios observed after the Lehman-Brothers collapse, which indicates that markets mostly demanded bonds instead of stocks. [less ▲]

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See detailDemographics and FDI: Lessons from China's One-Child Policy
Donaldson, John B.; Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Li, Jian et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

Lucas (1990) argues that the neoclassical adjustment process fails to explain the relative paucity of FDI inflows from rich to poor countries. In this paper we consider a natural experiment: using China ... [more ▼]

Lucas (1990) argues that the neoclassical adjustment process fails to explain the relative paucity of FDI inflows from rich to poor countries. In this paper we consider a natural experiment: using China as the treated country and India as the control, we show that the dynamics of the relative FDI flows subsequent to the implementation of China's one-child policy, as seen in the data, are consistent with neoclassical fundamentals. In particular, following the introduction of the one-child policy in China, the capital-labor (K/L) ratio of China increased relative to that of India, and, simultaneously, relative FDI inflows into China vs. India declined. These observations are explained in the context of a simple neoclassical OLG paradigm. The adjustment mechanism works as follows: the reduction in the (urban) labor force due to the one-child policy increases the savings per capita. This increases the K/L ratio and reduces the marginal product of capital (MPK). The reduction in MPK (relative to India) reduces the relative attractiveness of investment in China and is thus associated with lower FDI/GDP ratios. Our paper contributes to the nascent literature exploring demographic transitions and their effects on FDI flows. [less ▲]

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